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Dutch_12078

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Posted: 06/12/19 07:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We replaced a failing 7.5 cu ft Norcold absorption fridge with a 10.1 cu ft Haier residential fridge about 3 years and almost 20,000 miles ago. The fridge draws 1.2 running amps except for the few minutes the defrost function runs when it jumps to 1.8 amps. The LRA is listed at 6 amps, but measures at a momentary peak of 5.3 amps. A dedicated 850 watt PSW inverter handles the load with no complaints. The only time its been serviced was when a GE service tech replaced a recalled starting relay. Oh, and at 112 lbs, the Haier weighs about 15 lbs less than the Norcold.

* This post was edited 06/12/19 07:31pm by Dutch_12078 *


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Bill.Satellite

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Posted: 06/13/19 06:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JimK-NY wrote:

I cannot help but wonder if people are discussing a residential refrigerator in an RV or something that is used more like a mobile home that is rarely moved.

A residential refrigerator and solar system would be extremely heavy for an RV that is going to be used for thousands or tens of thousands of miles of travel per year. Residential refrigerators are heavy with a moderate sized unit weighting in at roughly 300#. We can argue about the number of solar panels but it seems 6 would be about the minimum. That will add another roughly 300#. The minimum for a battery bank to handle that power would add another 500# or more. The total would be well over 1000# and that is just for the refrigerator and the portion of solar needed to support it. The system is going to have to be much bigger to handle the rest of the electrical needs.


Most are referring to actually household fridges like I have in my RV. It's a GE Profile, side by side, ice/water through the door, 21CF fridge. If I ever need a replacement, the newer ones are more efficient and have larger capacity in the same space. This one has lasted 19 years and over 300,000 miles of driving. The DW wants a new one but it will likely be a French Door version.


What I post is my 2 cents and nothing more. Please don't read anything into my post that's not there. If you disagree, that's OK.
Can't we all just get along?

maillemaker

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Posted: 06/13/19 08:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

We replaced a failing 7.5 cu ft Norcold absorption fridge with a 10.1 cu ft Haier residential fridge about 3 years and almost 20,000 miles ago. The fridge draws 1.2 running amps except for the few minutes the defrost function runs when it jumps to 1.8 amps. The LRA is listed at 6 amps, but measures at a momentary peak of 5.3 amps. A dedicated 850 watt PSW inverter handles the load with no complaints. The only time its been serviced was when a GE service tech replaced a recalled starting relay. Oh, and at 112 lbs, the Haier weighs about 15 lbs less than the Norcold.


So how long would a group 29 12V battery run this thing for?


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AllegroD

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Posted: 06/13/19 11:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

maillemaker wrote:

So how long would a group 29 12V battery run this thing for?

I'd say, not enough variables listed to give a reasonable answer. ambient temp, type of inverter and other things running adjust the end result.

What I did on a day that was 65-72 degrees outside was to open all windows and leave the outside fridge hatch on. Nothing on but the fridge (RF18), Inverter (RV750ULW) and parasites, such as CO2 detector. Everything else was off.

Batteries: 2 GC2 US2000, 5 years old. In fair shape. Started at 12.7 and 8 hours later was at 12.1. I turned the power back on. I have not tested with other things like vents, fans or entertainment.

We do not boondock so I was not interested in deep management. I was happy with these results.

pnichols

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Posted: 06/13/19 12:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wow ... some of you folks sure have huge refrigerators in your rigs! (Our Liebherr 19.5 cu ft dual-compressor stick-house refrig is apparently around the size range as is in some of your RVs.)

Maybe it's those huge sizes that don't work well when using propane powered absorption technology?

Our RV's 6.3 cu ft absorption refrig works great, and we can get by at least a week living out of it when we leave home with it full or after filling it up at a market when on trips.


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JimK-NY

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Posted: 06/13/19 01:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I get by with a lot less and I am often in remote areas where I might need to go 2-3 weeks without a grocery store stop. My 4 cu ft refrigerator/freezer will store plenty of meat and other perishables. I do cheat on the fruits and vegetables. In hot weather they need some cooling so I use a small folding cloth ice chest. I put in a frozen blue ice packet every few days.

Rather than getting a unit big enough to handle weeks and weeks or months of food, I also have a lot of menus that can use non-refrigerated items. I make some pretty decent tacos and other dishes with Costco canned chicken.

BFL13

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Posted: 06/13/19 02:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I posted some time back how difficult it was to be off-grid without a propane fridge. With a 120v only fridge it is a "nail-biter" if you have a few days in a row with hardly any solar, and no generator.

This was in a truck camper where there was no place to put a generator, limited roof space for solar, and limited space for batteries too. It was an older 11ft camper with a busted 3-way fridge, so we tried a little 120v one. Finally had to go back to a "proper" 2-way and use propane off grid. What a relief to have the propane again! No more praying to the weather gods to make the sun come out on the Wet Coast in winter.

It is different obviously in your 40 foot rig in California sunshine where ice cubes are important. [emoticon]


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Planning

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Posted: 06/13/19 02:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think that (aside from those who opine based upon only experiencing one side of the refrigeration genre) one of the discussion issues is based upon the differing styles of RV'ing.

You have one type (I call them Smoke Sniffers) who prefer the more primitive "camping" style with very few luxury resources, versus those who prefer the comforts of home with the only substantive difference is that it is mobile. This is our hotel.

For example, some have no problem stretching their fresh water supply for weeks. Alternatively, we consider showering morning and evening to be a basic commodity (and with unlimited hot water), fresh towels every day and laundered sheets at least 3x's per week.

Once those differences are defined, and establishing that some do not, and have no need to consider "battery life" per se, it makes the choices and options more clear.

* This post was edited 06/13/19 03:11pm by Planning *


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Bill.Satellite

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Posted: 06/13/19 02:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We also full time in our RV (for over 20 years) so we want all the comforts in our home (just happens to have wheels) that we had in our fixed location home. We mostly have hook ups at night but sometimes dry camp using a generator a few hours in the AM and at night for cooking and entertainment before going to bed.
We also use the RV for business and while working in N. Orleans after Hurricane Katrina we ran the generator for 9 days 24/hours a day. Dry camping at its best! You just have to do what works for you.

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