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Open Roads Forum  >  RV Pet Stop  >  Dogs

 > Camping with Dobermans

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Control_Freak

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Posted: 06/13/19 08:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

gemsworld wrote:

"It's really not about the breed it's about the owner!"

I would be rich if I got a nickel every time I heard someone, usually a Pitbull or Rottweiler owner, say this.


This is because people are constantly blaming certain breeds based on the actions of other dogs, so those people who have those breeds but are friendly are constantly having to defend their dog.

Pawz4me

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Posted: 06/14/19 04:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think these size wars are beyond silly.

Years ago I had a young Rottie. She was attacked once by a mini Doxie. Thankfully by that point I'd gotten her reasonably well trained (not perfect by a long shot), and she just looked at me while the Doxie was hanging off her neck. It was kind of funny in hindsight, as he was of course never a serious threat to her. She outweighed him by about 70 pounds. Her head was almost as big as his entire body.

Now I have a Shih Tzu. He's been rushed (not attacked, thank goodness) by several pitbulls, an ACD, a GSD and a couple of hounds. Those are just the ones I can remember off the top of my head. It's an all-too-common occurrence in campgrounds. In the heat of the moment and in hindsight these are most definitely not funny. They're very scary, as the larger dogs could quickly and easily kill him. Thankfully the Tzu is unflappable and quietly and calmly stands his ground and gives them a "What is your problem, stupid" look. I'd like to take credit in the training department (like all of our dogs, he's been trained extensively), but it's mostly just his nature. I really should have done therapy work with him.

I do not think all little dogs are untrained yappers (which is silly) nor do I think all bigger dogs are uncontrollably aggressive (which is also silly).

All of our reports here are anecdotal, and for most they're colored by the person's usually very obvious bias, and certainly by the size of the dog the poster currently owns. It gets tedious. Humans are silly and nonsensical most of the time.

OP, you will encounter some RV parks that don't allow your dogs. But I don't think there are so many of them that it will present a huge problem. In our experience most people in RV parks are dog friendly and don't have the biases that are often displayed on here. Over the years we have RV'd with well trained dogs of all sizes and have never met anyone who seemed put off by any of them. Good luck!


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RandACampin

Kathleen, Georgia

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Posted: 06/14/19 05:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rots, Pitsbulls, Dobermans and others have a bad rep for a reason. All dogs will attack in the right circumstances, some however are more prone to it than others. Dogs were bred for reasons, some for war and attack....you cannot take these insticts out of them.
There are lists for a reason.

Deb and Ed M

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Posted: 06/14/19 07:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have been lucky enough to camp next to a few Dobies as we traveled - in every case, they were exceptionally-trained. Arrived once to see two sitting loose on the patio rug with their owner, and thought "uh-oh". Before we even set up, I went over, introduced myself, admitted that we had an idiot, rescued Cattle Dog with a really bad attitude towards big dark-colored dogs. The owner laughed, said he understood, said his dogs are trained to not leave the patio rug. I kept my idiot dog from seeing the Dobies, and we had a great weekend!

Th Trailer Life campground guide book used to tell what campgrounds had pet restrictions; either (B) breed, (S) size, or (N) number. The OP will have to watch for the (B) parks, but aside from that - happy camping! And on the "plus" side - Dobies are one of those breeds that people ususally don't send their kids, en masse, to "go over and pet". At least you won't become the campground babysitter.....LOL!

D.E.Bishop

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Posted: 06/14/19 07:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks to toedtoes and Control_Freak, most of my approach I learned from watching, both real life meetings with animals and PBS programs on wolves and other group or pack animals. I try real hard to let dogs find me, if there is any sign of timidness or aggression I let the owner lead what I do.

I didn't know about eye contact but do try to avoid head touches.

I will say that I feel in the last ten or fifteen years, owners have been better trained at training their animals, we appreciate what you have learned. And recently we met a camper walking his very big, like St. Bernard big dog, at Three Rivers Casino in Coos Bay, OR. He and I started talking, mostly how is it living with a dog who essentially bigger than he was in a motor home. The dog was in the left side heel position but was looking from me to his owner and when I ask if I could approach the dog the gentleman nodded to me and said, "OK" to the dog and gestured to me. Well this well mannered monster was just one huge lover guy. He nuzzled and rubbed my legs with his head but never licked, just kind of smiled and was happy to greet me. He never took his eyes off his human for more than a few seconds and soon went back to the left side and laid down and closed his eyes. When we were done discussing a new campground being built a few miles away and said so long, the owner softly said his dogs name, the dog got up and they walked off.


"I travel not to go anywhere, but to go. I travel for travel's sake. The great affair is to go". R. L. Stevenson

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toedtoes

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Posted: 06/14/19 10:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Years ago, I was at a grand opening for a leashless park. One of the top trainers in the area was there with his dog. As we stood outside the enclosed area watching people with their dogs unleashed in the parking lot, the main park area, and the leashless area, Kevin said "this is the stupidest thing I've ever seen. No matter how well trained my dog is, I would never let him offleash like this." His point was that no matter how well trained HIS dog is, he cannot guarantee that of every dog they meet. It doesn't matter that your dog will stay at your side or stay on the mat or stay at attention. That other dog could approach your dog and a fight ensues. And without a leash on your dog, you will have to stick your hand into the fight to pull your dog out. Shortly afterwards, we saw a woman walking through the dogs with a cat on her shoulder and he said "no that's the stupidest thing I've ever seen".

When I had Dog, we were on our front lawn practicing stays. She was in a stand stay. A dog that was walking down the street with its owner (unleashed) ran up onto the lawn and literally bulldozed Dog over. I had Dog on a leash and was able to lead her away as this other dog kept trying to knock her down. The owner was chasing along behind trying to grab its collar. Another time at a leashless park, I had just walked inside with Dog when a large chocolate lab walked up and peed on her. The owner stood there laughing. Dog was still on her leash - we turned around and walked out. Dog was an extremely well trained and well behaved dog, but I can't control the behaviors of other dogs or people so I make sure I have a leash on my dogs regardless of their obedience level.


1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
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Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

toedtoes

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Posted: 06/14/19 11:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I would also point out that most problems aren't due to "aggression". Bat-dog is not aggressive. She is afraid. Her fear is what drives her. If she feels threatened or cornered, she will react first think later. So making sure she doesn't feel threatened or cornered is my job.

Eye contact is a big one for her. It's too intense for her. I have a friend who joins us camping a lot. This friend had a dog as a kid, but has never been around them otherwise. When they first met, Bat-dog barked at her. My friend barked back jokingly. Bat-dog did not approve. For years, Bat-dog would not go near my friend and would bark non-stop at her. I kept giving my friend suggestions on how to approach and be around Bat-dog. She often felt she was completely hopeless around dogs. It took a long time, but my friend has learned a lot. Now, Bat-dog will let her scratch the tummy and doesn't bark at her constantly. Sometimes, I will hear my friend say "oh I'm sorry, I looked at you". Bat-dog will even lay her head on my friend's leg. My friend is no longer afraid of Bat-dog because she understands how HER actions affect Bat-dog. And she can approach other dogs with more self-assurance because she can better read the dog's signals. Fortunately, through it all, she has had Moose-dog who thinks it's his his job to protect and keep her safe. But even with him, she had to learn to talk to him - let him know when she was just going away for a moment or actually leaving because he would stand guard waiting for her to return for hours.

Last year, I was listening to the radio and they mentioned a new study with dogs. I texted my friend the results and she said "oh yes they do!" . The study found that dogs hold grudges...

BB_TX

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Posted: 06/14/19 11:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

After all is said and done, it still comes down to a simple fact. The large powerful breeds are capable of inflicting significant physical damage IF they do bite. And no RV park owner has the time or expertise to determine the personality of every dog that may enter their park. Yes, you are probably more likely to be bitten by a high strung little yapper than a large dog. But where the yapper may break the skin and cause some bleeding, that large dog can tear flesh and muscle. I am not opposed to large breeds by any means. My Golden weighs 88 lbs. But the large dogs do require special considerations by their owners and by those who own or operate facilities in which they may enter.

toedtoes

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Posted: 06/14/19 11:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BB_TX wrote:

After all is said and done, it still comes down to a simple fact. The large powerful breeds are capable of inflicting significant physical damage IF they do bite. And no RV park owner has the time or expertise to determine the personality of every dog that may enter their park. Yes, you are probably more likely to be bitten by a high strung little yapper than a large dog. But where the yapper may break the skin and cause some bleeding, that large dog can tear flesh and muscle. I am not opposed to large breeds by any means. My Golden weighs 88 lbs. But the large dogs do require special considerations by their owners and by those who own or operate facilities in which they may enter.


I think it's more simple than that. A private park can make whatever rules about pets they want. If you don't like the rule, go elsewhere.

For public campgrounds, most usually have rules for all dogs, not breed or size specific. Again, if you don't like the rule, go elsewhere.

I don't stay at parks with breed specific rules. I rarely stay at campgrounds with overly strict rules (e.g., no dogs anywhere but the campground and roads). I prefer to stay at campgrounds that let me hike the trails with my dogs and let my dogs in the water. I prefer campgrounds that require all dogs to be leashed.

The rest is up to me. I follow the rules for the campground. I keep my dogs safe.

BCSnob

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Posted: 06/14/19 12:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BB_TX wrote:

Yes, you are probably more likely to be bitten by a high strung little yapper than a large dog. But where the yapper may break the skin and cause some bleeding,....
So do you consider JRTs little yappers? I think you’d find this small breed (do to the genetics of this breed) can do more damage than you’ve described.

Most pet dogs (ones not specifically bred for the breed function) no longer carry the correct complement of behavioral genes to exhibit the expected behaviors which originally defined the breed. This makes accurately predicting behaviors solely based upon appearance (how most people define breeds) difficult at best.

Find campgrounds that welcome your dogs and support them; ignore those that don’t welcome your dogs. I personally cannot help you with campground situations, in the 20 some years we’ve been RVing with dogs we’ve never stayed in a campground. We take our RV to dog events; we haven’t taken our dogs camping.

* This post was last edited 06/14/19 12:40pm by BCSnob *   View edit history


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