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 > Which shocks IF...

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FunTwoDrv

NC

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Posted: 06/25/19 07:33am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ron,
That cupping on your right tire looked very much like the tires on our C. Unfortunately this happened after we put new shocks on. The tire mfg said it was due to us not rotating the tires. However, Michelin dealer claimed it was due to an out-of-balance issue caused by a belt failure... who knows! I put a new set of Michelins on and are watching them closely so as to not revisit this same issue down the road.
Gary

ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 06/27/19 07:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

FunTwoDrv wrote:

Ron,
That cupping on your right tire looked very much like the tires on our C. Unfortunately this happened after we put new shocks on. The tire mfg said it was due to us not rotating the tires. However, Michelin dealer claimed it was due to an out-of-balance issue caused by a belt failure... who knows! I put a new set of Michelins on and are watching them closely so as to not revisit this same issue down the road.
Gary
Hi Gary,

I was at an automotive workshop where "cupping" like I have was discussed. The person giving the lecture said "cupping" is caused from an improper alignment.

I do wonder if our lighter-weighted front wheel alignment which was compensated through off-set bushings, would have been better addressed through replacing the front coil springs with E150 springs.

The front coil springs on my E350 Super Duty chassis handle 4600 pounds.
My on-trip loaded rig with us in the front two seats, the entire front end weighs only 3260 pounds.
The E150 coil springs handle 3900 pounds, still too much, but closer to the actual load.

Because my front coil springs are rated so much more than my actual load, my front end sits higher than it should. The offset bushings installed addressed the positive camber created from the condition, but I feel the better solution are lower-rated front springs. Not just for alignment purposes, but also to provide a more comfortable ride. The heavy duty shocks should keep the front end under proper control to prevent any extra porpoising.

Ron Dittmer
2007 Phoenix Cruiser motor home built on a Ford E350-V10 Super Duty chassis with OEM 158" wheel base


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 06/27/19 12:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ron, of course if your heavy duty front shocks also mean that they're stiffer shocks - then your front ride could be rougher than necessary for two reasons -> underloaded front coil springs plus shocks that don't compress/extend as easily.

Do you have rear air bags that you can adjust to permanently raise the rear and hence transfer more weight unto the front?


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

DrewE

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Posted: 06/27/19 07:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

Ron, of course if your heavy duty front shocks also mean that they're stiffer shocks - then your front ride could be rougher than necessary for two reasons -> underloaded front coil springs plus shocks that don't compress/extend as easily.

Do you have rear air bags that you can adjust to permanently raise the rear and hence transfer more weight unto the front?


Raising the rear does not transfer any significant amount of weight to the front, any more than parking on a slight hill does. Probably a pet walking from the rear to the front of the motorhome causes about as much weight transfer.

I guess if you raise the rear by several feet things would start to be a little different....





ron.dittmer

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Posted: 06/27/19 08:50pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DrewE wrote:

pnichols wrote:

Ron, of course if your heavy duty front shocks also mean that they're stiffer shocks - then your front ride could be rougher than necessary for two reasons -> under loaded front coil springs plus shocks that don't compress/extend as easily.

Do you have rear air bags that you can adjust to permanently raise the rear and hence transfer more weight unto the front?
Raising the rear does not transfer any significant amount of weight to the front, any more than parking on a slight hill does. Probably a pet walking from the rear to the front of the motor home causes about as much weight transfer.

I guess if you raise the rear by several feet things would start to be a little different....
I believe the most influential factor is that our E350 is 23'-8" long with a 158" wheelbase resulting in a significant rear overhang. Then adding that our fresh water tank is against the rear wall (and we always carry a full tank), the teeter-totter effect lifts & lightens the front axle.

Regarding the heavy duty Bilstein shocks I recently installed, they are the right choice for our rig today. I don't feel they would be a problem with the next lower coil spring rate. When the teeter goes totter, they should do well in cancelling it regardless of the spring rate.

Bordercollie

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Posted: 07/03/19 11:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What would be the best way to improve harsh ride from rear duals on cupped concrete highways. ( Change rear springs, add airbags or ??) We get out and walk around at rest stops. Tioga 26Q 80 psi in rear tires, 75 in fronts.

pnichols

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Posted: 07/03/19 03:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bordercollie wrote:

What would be the best way to improve harsh ride from rear duals on cupped concrete highways. ( Change rear springs, add airbags or ??) We get out and walk around at rest stops. Tioga 26Q 80 psi in rear tires, 75 in fronts.


A few years ago I had my OEM rear shocks replaced with Koni FSD shocks to see if their dual zone damping would help with the cracks and potholes pounding in the rear.

The FSD shocks did the trick. As an indicator - our shower door latch (our shower is in the rear) would always come loose from the jolts which the OEM shocks would not reduce. The latch has never come loose in the years since installation of the FSD shocks back there.

In fact I think that the relatively always-stiff OEM shocks were adding to the stiffness of my under-loaded rear leaf springs at all times and in all situations. Now the FSD shocks only "auto-adjust to stiff" with the slower happening swaying forces from curves, side winds, from parking lot curbs, and from passing box trucks.

The above are examples of the dual action affects from these shocks - stiff when slow acting damping is required, and soft when quick acting damping is required.

I run 75-80 lbs. pressure in the rear duals and 65-70 lbs. pressure in the front singles. Our 24 foot Class C runs around 12,000 lbs. when fully loaded on it's E450 chassis.

* This post was edited 07/03/19 08:06pm by pnichols *

Cobra21

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Posted: 07/08/19 07:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Heavy duty shocks are nice but if your shocks are toast, honestly any new shock is better than what you currently have. I put on normal replacement shocks a couple years back and am very pleased with their performance!
Brian

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