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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Terrible factory splices in brake wiring

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myredracer

Langley B.C.

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Posted: 06/21/19 10:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

OMG, I never would have thought splices in the brake wiring could be this bad.

Am just replacing the backing plate assemblies on one axle. The first couple of splices I looked at were pretty bad so I cut all 8 of them out and this is what I found. The barrel connectors are marked "16-14". The incoming wires to each brake appears to be #18 ga. according to my wire strippers (I could verify on a gauge). Two wires should NOT be inserted into one end on these connectors.

I cannot believe this kind of cr@p workmanship can happen, especially on brake wiring which is obviously such a safety issue. Only two of the splices would be acceptable. I am soldering all 8 splices and using heat shrink tubing.


Only one crimp in the center of the barrel connector. Wire on right side not crimped plus note the wire is tarnished. The wire just slipped out of the connector and was only held in place by the plastic jacket on the connector.
[image]
[image]


Partial strands inserted into one end of the connector. The other end has two wires inserted into it.
[image]


Note on this one how the single wire was not fully crimped. Also two wires inserted into the other end and partial strands.
[image]

* This post was edited 06/21/19 10:26am by myredracer *


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JRscooby

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Posted: 06/21/19 10:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

About the only time I use solder is if I need to join 2 small wires to a larger one. I twist the 2 together and solder, then use a right-size crimp connector to join that joint to the other. Before I put the wires in, I fill the connector with silicone. After I crimp, (Use good crimp tool, don't just mash it) wipe off the excess. Strong, insulated, and sealed.

Ductape

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Posted: 06/21/19 10:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Can't do better than a low resistance soldered connection. I've done the same on brand new trailers.


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the bear II

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Posted: 06/21/19 10:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you are the first owner of the trailer you're right this is poor workmanship. However, if this was a used trailer when you bought it, looking at the photos, my first reaction is these were done by a previous owner or shade tree mechanic.

Due to liability issues it's hard for me to believe a trailer or axle manufacturer would allow such shoddy work.

time2roll

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Posted: 06/21/19 11:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a preference to crimp over solder. Either way it can't be worse than what you found.


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BillyBob Jim

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Posted: 06/21/19 11:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

the bear II wrote:

If you are the first owner of the trailer you're right this is poor workmanship. However, if this was a used trailer when you bought it, looking at the photos, my first reaction is these were done by a previous owner or shade tree mechanic.

Due to liability issues it's hard for me to believe a trailer or axle manufacturer would allow such shoddy work.


You're either new to RV's or very naive. The OP is talking 12VDC brake wiring, they do some doosies at times with 120VAC and you mention liability issues. Things such as 3621 trailers recalled.

myredracer

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Posted: 06/21/19 11:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

the bear II wrote:

If you are the first owner of the trailer you're right this is poor workmanship. However, if this was a used trailer when you bought it, looking at the photos, my first reaction is these were done by a previous owner or shade tree mechanic.

Due to liability issues it's hard for me to believe a trailer or axle manufacturer would allow such shoddy work.
We're the original owners and this is KZ factory workmanship and am not amused. Unacceptable!

Interestingly, this isn't the first time I've found bad crimps and connections in this TT on 12 volts (and 120 volts too). They need to start by stopping hiring one-eyed monkeys and start doing some quality control inspections as well. I have to wonder what the NHTSA would say about something like this. Perhaps some of the photos & stories of FWs & TTs in road accidents you see posted from time to time may have been a result of bad wiring like this.

dodge guy

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Posted: 06/21/19 11:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yep those are bad doesn’t matter who did them. I was having issues with my 07 trailer after I bought it new. It never stopped good, not even ok! I went around and replaced all the poor crimp connections. I would t want a crimp connection on anything that moves or vibrates! I soldered all the connections. It helped a bit. My problem ultimately was bad magnets. Replaced all 4 and the trailer would stop both itself and the TV without a problem. I figure they were bad from the beginning. It couldn’t have been driven with the brakes applied because the shoes were good. I doubt the pin was pulled because they don’t install batteries until it’s sold.

Either way good job on repairing a potential accident.


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myredracer

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Posted: 06/21/19 11:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ductape wrote:

Can't do better than a low resistance soldered connection. I've done the same on brand new trailers.
And I have to question their use of #18 wire. I'd like to upgrade that but wouldn't be an easy job as it's hidden behind the underbelly.

JRscooby

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Posted: 06/21/19 11:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ductape wrote:

Can't do better than a low resistance soldered connection. I've done the same on brand new trailers.


I thought like that for awhile, because that's what Dad taught me. And likely if you can keep it dry, it might be true. A few nights behind the scale house, with a driver and his dispatch ranting to get the lights working changed my mind. If water can get to it so can road salt. And soon you got something that will not conduct electricity.


BillyBob Jim wrote:

the bear II wrote:

If you are the first owner of the trailer you're right this is poor workmanship. However, if this was a used trailer when you bought it, looking at the photos, my first reaction is these were done by a previous owner or shade tree mechanic.

Due to liability issues it's hard for me to believe a trailer or axle manufacturer would allow such shoddy work.


You're either new to RV's or very naive. The OP is talking 12VDC brake wiring, they do some doosies at times with 120VAC and you mention liability issues. Things such as 3621 trailers recalled.


I would think non-functioning brakes might be a liability issue...

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