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 > What gauge wire do I use

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Campin LI

Long Island

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Posted: 07/10/19 05:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hello,

I want to place a 30 amp breaker in the panel of my house and then run about 200 ft of uf-b cable to a 30 amp rv outlet that I will place near my travel trailer. I would like to have the ability to use my travel trailer the same way as I would if I were at a full hookup campground.

What gauge wire should I use?

Thank you!

GordonThree

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Posted: 07/10/19 06:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

6/3 or heavier for the future.


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Lwiddis

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Posted: 07/10/19 06:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Within reason no determent to using a larger gauge wire than the minimum.


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Boomerweps

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Posted: 07/10/19 06:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Wonderful calculator at calculator.net. Voltage Drop Calculator. Plug in Amperage used, distance and wire gauge and it will tell you the voltage drop in volts and percent. If you drop to 105vac, you will be on the edge of damaging electric controls in your appliances. Voltage loss will depend on actual amperage used on that length and gauge wire.
Having an Electrical Management System like a Progressive Industries one will tell you actual voltage and protect from out of spec power. Even a Kil-a-watt via a 15-30 amp adapter will let you know of power variations as you turn on different appliances.


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Posted: 07/10/19 06:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GordonThree wrote:

6/3 or heavier for the future.


With ground.
4 total conductors.
One spare unused with the 30 amp application.


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DFord

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Posted: 07/10/19 06:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A search took me to: http://www.paigewire.com/pumpWireCalc.aspx where they recommended 4 AGW copper or 2 AGW aluminum for a 120 volt, 30 amp circuit at 200 ft with 3% tolerance. Change the tolerance to 5% and you can get by with 6 AGW copper wire.

http://wiresizecalculator.net/ came back with 3 AGW copper wire with a 3% tolerance or 6 AGW for 5% tolerance for direct burial.

3% of 120 = 3.7 volts - 120v - 3.7 = 116.3v
5% or 120 = 6 volts - 120v - 6 = 114v

I'd use the 5% tolerance figures.

https://www.calculator.net/voltage-drop-........0&distanceunit=feet&eres=30&x=48&y=29 Agrees with these figures.

* This post was edited 07/10/19 06:48pm by DFord *


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Campin LI

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Posted: 07/10/19 06:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GordonThree wrote:

6/3 or heavier for the future.
Thanks. I was thinking 8, thinking 6 is a bit overkill. Why 6? Does 6 fit in a 30 amp breaker?

Campin LI

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Posted: 07/10/19 06:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Boomerweps wrote:

Wonderful calculator at calculator.net. Voltage Drop Calculator. Plug in Amperage used, distance and wire gauge and it will tell you the voltage drop in volts and percent. If you drop to 105vac, you will be on the edge of damaging electric controls in your appliances. Voltage loss will depend on actual amperage used on that length and gauge wire.
Having an Electrical Management System like a Progressive Industries one will tell you actual voltage and protect from out of spec power. Even a Kil-a-watt via a 15-30 amp adapter will let you know of power variations as you turn on different appliances.


I looked at calculators like what you described. The internet seems to complicate this subject with load calculations. My house was built having 15 amp circuits with 14 gauge wires and 20 amp circuits with 12 gauge wires. Nobody calculated any loads for each circuit - It's just standard code. I was thinking 30 amp circuit gets 10 guage but because my run is longer than 100 ft move up a size to get 8 gauge wire. The above poster mentioned 6 gauge which I also read but I also read the wire would need to be trimmed to fit in a 30 amp breaker. That's what makes me think that 6 guage is overkill. I just want to do it right. Thanks for all the input. I do appreciate it.

Campin LI

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Posted: 07/10/19 06:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DFord wrote:

A search took me to: http://www.paigewire.com/pumpWireCalc.aspx where they recommended 4 AGW copper or 2 AGW aluminum for a 120 volt, 30 amp circuit at 200 ft with 3% tolerance. Change the tolerance to 5% and you can get by with 6 AGW copper wire.

http://wiresizecalculator.net/ came back with 3 AGW copper wire with a 3% tolerance or 6 AGW for 5% tolerance for direct burial.

3% of 120 = 3.7 volts - 120v - 3.7 = 116.3v
5% or 120 = 6 volts - 120v - 6 = 114v

I'd use the 5% tolerance figures.

https://www.calculator.net/voltage-drop-........=200&distanceunit=feet&eres=30&x=48&y=29 Agrees with these figures.


I just finished typing my response above and now see your. This is all to complicated for me to understand. There must be some kind of code or standard as I do not know what the load will be but I know it will be less than 30 amps since thats where my camper breaker will trip.

RJsfishin

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Posted: 07/10/19 07:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have an RV pad at 100 feet, works great on 10 ga,.........I'd go 8 ga for 200 ft


Rich

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