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 > Class C steering stabilizer

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ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 07/12/19 08:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

bobndot wrote:

I operated medium duty ambulances all my working life on highways at 80 mph and never had to add any of this aftermarket stuff. A correct alignment was always most helpful.
Keep in-mind that there is a huge difference between an E450 chassis ambulance and an E450 motor home. Nearly every Ford E350/E450 and Chevy 3500/4500 based motor home has a significant frame extension hanging off the back of the OEM chassis. Ambulances are built and limited to the length of the original Ford or Chevy chassis. The frame extension on a motor home messes with handling and weight distribution, often accompanied by a massive over-head bed that protrudes forward of the windshield acting like a sail in reverse direction. You really cannot compare any ambulance to a class C motor home even though they are built on the same basic chassis.


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

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Posted: 07/12/19 08:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have been on RV forums for around 12 years now. It seems that owners of shorter rigs with long rear over-hangs, and owners of longer rigs with shorter wheels bases, have handling issues and often consider suspension upgrades to improve handling. Based on that, it is easy to conclude that a long wheel base with a short over-all length is going to naturally handle better. Then add to that, a B+ cap instead of an over-head sleeper, angled transition walls, a lower over-all profile, everything in combination are additional positive influences for a better handling rig. It does explain why some of us say their rigs need help, and others who think the complaints are unfounded.

Our rig has a 158" wheel base and an over-all length of 23-8". I feel we have a lot of rear over-hang when considering the wheel base. Our 2007 E350 chassis from Ford did not include any kind of rear stabilizer bar. Ford started included one in 2008. We invested further in heavy duty front & rear stabilizer bars, heavy duty shocks, a Safe-T-Plus steering stabilizer, a rear trac bar, and a front wheel alignment. All in combination, the improvement was dramatic. For my wife and me, adding another $3900 to a $70,000 purchase was one more upgrade, just as we invested in other upgrades. The suspension upgrade improved our over-all safety and driving & riding comfort, which also stabilizes our rig when parked eliminating for the need for stabilization jacks. My wife is very comfortable driving our rig with tow vehicle, a huge benefit all by itself.

Since 2007 when we had all the work done, I learned that I could have saved a lot of money by buying and installing nearly everything myself, saving 1/2 to 2/3 of our $3900 investment.

* This post was last edited 07/13/19 06:15am by ron.dittmer *   View edit history

bobndot

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Posted: 07/13/19 03:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

marty1300 wrote:

It drove nice but a semi would push it every now and then


Regarding passing trucks . You might want to research rear track bars. Experiment with tire PSI too.
After asking about passing trucks, I was advised by the supplier that a rear track bar would stabilize side to side movement of the rear axle, reducing the dancing that we feel from turbulence.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 07/13/19 07:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I found air tabs helped with trucks pushing and also lowered the noise level inside my class c.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

rondeb

Pacific Northwest

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Posted: 07/13/19 11:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We had a Safe T Steer installed on our 30 foot class A and our 33 foot Class A. We did not really notice a difference that was worth the purchase price. A good alignment is the best thing you can do IMHO

Cruisineasy

Hayward

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Posted: 07/20/19 07:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Harvard wrote:

Research E450 caster alignment before investing in steering stabilizers.


Agreed. I have a 31'. It was a bear to keep on the road. Did some research and found the tire pressure was the problem. The drivers door has a tag that notes the manufacturers suggested tire pressures. I had them all at 80psi. The tag notes, 75psi front and 80psi rear. After I adjusted, made a complete difference.

Harvard

51.6N 114.7W

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Posted: 07/20/19 03:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Cruisineasy wrote:

Harvard wrote:

Research E450 caster alignment before investing in steering stabilizers.


Agreed. I have a 31'. It was a bear to keep on the road. Did some research and found the tire pressure was the problem. The drivers door has a tag that notes the manufacturers suggested tire pressures. I had them all at 80psi. The tag notes, 75psi front and 80psi rear. After I adjusted, made a complete difference.


Agreed, tire pressure effects the dynamic runtime caster trail.
The caster setting defines the range of effect a change in tire pressure will produce. IMO

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