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Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Traveling with a Residential Fridge?

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austinjenna

Columbus, Ohio

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Joined: 03/27/2002

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Posted: 07/28/19 05:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

A residential fridge is a huge cost savings for the manufacturer.

Think about it. No LP lines to run to it. No 12V power needed. So no 12V lines to run to it.


They now need to add an inverter which probably costs more than just some black pipe and wire.



2010 F350 CC Lariat 4x4 Short Bed
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pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 07/28/19 12:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Austinjenna,

It is not the materials--it is the labor.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 07/28/19 02:46pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

austinjenna wrote:

Quote:

A residential fridge is a huge cost savings for the manufacturer.

Think about it. No LP lines to run to it. No 12V power needed. So no 12V lines to run to it.


They now need to add an inverter which probably costs more than just some black pipe and wire.


Inverters are dirt cheap now days, $200 gets you a pretty healthy 2,000W inverter.

My residential conversion was $300 for 10 Cu ft fridge, $200 for inverter and one pair of 6V GC batts (series configuration for 12V) for $180 and less than $50 for 1/0 wire for a whopping $730. Although I don't really count the batteries since I was already needing a battery and I stepped up to the GC batts so in reality my upgrade was $550.

Compare that to $1800-$2500 for a new RV fridge in 10 cu ft size..

RV manufacturers are stepping up to residential fridges because it does cost less, there is less openings to the outside to leak and they save on running propane gas lines to the fridge (a bonus for those who have fridges in slides).

Solar panels are considerably much less expensive now days making a residential fridge a real easy decision.

My one pair of GC batts can easily go 24 hrs before needing to recharge and they supply all of my RV power for that time.

Best of all, I use virtually no propane which is a HUGE cost savings, over the last 11 yrs of use, I have only had to refill ONE 30 lb propane tank..

Weldon

Texas

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Posted: 07/28/19 05:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Love my residential refrigerator!

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