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 > Outdoor GFCI outlet trips when using electric cooktop

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Revolver

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Posted: 07/29/19 02:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hello,
When I plug my electric cooktop into the outdoor GFCI outlet, the GFCI trips. The cooktop is rated at 1000w according to the label. Do those GFCI outlets have a lower amperage rating than normal?

Thanks,
Ray


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Revolver

Winnipeg

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Posted: 07/29/19 02:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Revolver wrote:

Hello,
When I plug my electric cooktop into the outdoor GFCI outlet, the GFCI trips. The cooktop is rated at 1000w according to the label. Do those GFCI outlets have a lower amperage rating than normal?

Thanks,
Ray


I should clarify, it doesn't trip immediately when I plug it in. In fact, when I turn the cooktop on it begins to heat but not very much. Then the GFCI trips.

3 tons

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Posted: 07/29/19 03:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Revolver wrote:

Hello,
When I plug my electric cooktop into the outdoor GFCI outlet, the GFCI trips. The cooktop is rated at 1000w according to the label. Do those GFCI outlets have a lower amperage rating than normal?

Thanks,
Ray


No, it sounds more like a small amount of internal leakage inside the cooktop, possibly from a cracked element insulator - the GFI is likely reacting to this worn condition..

the bear II

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Posted: 07/29/19 03:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GFCI outlets do go bad often or something in the cooktop once it heats up is causing the GFCI to trip. If you have another GFCI outlet inside the RV try the cooktop in it as a test to see if it trips.

CA Traveler

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Posted: 07/29/19 03:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Revolver wrote:

Hello,
When I plug my electric cooktop into the outdoor GFCI outlet, the GFCI trips. The cooktop is rated at 1000w according to the label. Do those GFCI outlets have a lower amperage rating than normal?

Thanks,
Ray
GFCIs are NOT CBs and don't detect over current, but rather an imbalance of amps between the hot and neutral. Try the cooktop on another GFCI and if it doesn't trips - well you know. Otherwise it's the cooktop.


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wa8yxm

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Posted: 07/29/19 03:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The GFCI OUTLET itself is not current sensitive as far as "Total Anps" is concerned

IT IS. however very sensitive as to amps in v/s amps out. Even a couple mA (1/1000th) of an amp) will trip it if there is any imbalance in the hot and neutral currents.

IN short. your cooktop is the problem. Likely a very tiny hot to case short.

Now a GFCI Circuit breaker (Combination curcuit breaker and GFCI. will trip on overload as well as imbalance.


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Posted: 07/29/19 04:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My wife's brother and family got rid of the propane outdoor appliances and went to all electric, they set up a table next the trailer and cook away, until a few years ago when it kept tripping the GFCI (it was on bathroom circuit, took them awhile to find it the first time).. they asked me how to figure out what is happening, I said to just run extension cord from power post to cook table.. most power posts have a 20amp outlet next the 30/50 so use it. No more problems..

wopachop

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Posted: 07/29/19 05:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

3 tons wrote:

Revolver wrote:

Hello,
When I plug my electric cooktop into the outdoor GFCI outlet, the GFCI trips. The cooktop is rated at 1000w according to the label. Do those GFCI outlets have a lower amperage rating than normal?

Thanks,
Ray


No, it sounds more like a small amount of internal leakage inside the cooktop, possibly from a cracked element insulator - the GFI is likely reacting to this worn condition..
Can you explain more por favor? Does the crack itself fill with a somewhat conductive liquid causing the hot and ground to tickle each other?

3 tons

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Posted: 07/29/19 05:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

“Can you explain more por favor? Does the crack itself fill with a somewhat conductive liquid causing the hot and ground to tickle each other?“

wa8yxm has provided a great summary...

Groover

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Posted: 07/29/19 08:15pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wopachop wrote:

3 tons wrote:

Revolver wrote:

Hello,
When I plug my electric cooktop into the outdoor GFCI outlet, the GFCI trips. The cooktop is rated at 1000w according to the label. Do those GFCI outlets have a lower amperage rating than normal?

Thanks,
Ray


No, it sounds more like a small amount of internal leakage inside the cooktop, possibly from a cracked element insulator - the GFI is likely reacting to this worn condition..
Can you explain more por favor? Does the crack itself fill with a somewhat conductive liquid causing the hot and ground to tickle each other?


Basically your plug has 3 pins. The power comes in through one blade and is supposed to leave through the other. These are sometimes referred to as the hot and the neutral. For safety in case something breaks and the hot wire touches the same parts that you do (the case) the round pin connects the case to ground so that the electricity doesn't try to go through you to get to ground. The GFI circuit essentially counts the electrons going out through the hot blade connector and compares it with the number coming back through the neutral. If there is a difference it concludes that there is a possibility that the case is charged with electricity and you could be injured so it shuts off the flow of electricity. Many times the device would still work and the leak from hot to the case is taken care of by the ground but just in case you have a ground problem the GFI kills the circuit. There may or may not be "conductive liquid" (water) present but somehow the electricity is finding its way to the case. The best solution is to check the cooktop by trying it on another GFI outlet and replacing it if that GFI trips as well.

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