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Open Roads Forum  >  RVing in Canada and Alaska  >  Canada

 > Special Trailer Brakes Required in Canada?

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shum02

Burlington ON CDA

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Posted: 07/30/19 05:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Very more than likely if you conform to your local State laws and regs you will be fine here as we are when we travel in your neck of the woods. Ontario requires trailer brakes on trailers over 3000lbs.

You will NOT find anyone here in Ontario doing any inspections on out of country trailers except maybe around the Victoria Day weekend and only on major highway off ramps.


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Jack_Diane_Freedom

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Posted: 07/30/19 05:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Trailer brakes in Canada must be used only in metric.

cross21114

Baltimore, MD, USA

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Posted: 07/30/19 05:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wilber1 wrote:

It's a provincial thing.

BC Regulations

Trailer Brake Requirements
Gross trailer weight of 1,400 kg (3,080 Ibs) or less – Brakes are required if the trailer and its load weigh more than 50% of the licensed weight of the vehicle towing it.
Gross trailer weight of 1,401 kg (3,081 Ibs) to 2,800 kg (6,160 Ibs) – Brakes are required, including a breakaway brake.
Gross trailer weight of more than 2,800 kg (6,160 Ibs) – Brakes are required, and the trailer brakes must be capable of being applied by the driver independently of the towing vehicle's brakes. A surge brake does NOT meet this requirement. A breakaway brake is also required. Brakes are required on all axles.
The sole exemption to this rule is for a 3 axle house trailer, in which case brakes are only required on 2 of the 3 axles.


This could catch those with heavier toads. Do any of the toad braking systems allow independent application of brakes? Also catches me because my brake system is a surge brake.

ppine

Northern Nevada

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Posted: 07/30/19 07:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Roads in BC and Alberta are steeper than US roads. Their design criteria are less stringent. There are some long 12% grades. You need brakes that work or you are going to have problems.

SideHillSoup

South Eastern British Columbia

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Posted: 07/30/19 03:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MDKMDK wrote:

Hey Soup, as long as you're not appearing regularly on Jamie Davis' TV show, you must be OK, eh? That Coquihalla Pass is one nasty piece of work. We did the one farther east between Radium HS and Banff along 93 back in 2015. It was a foothill compared to the ones near you, I bet. Keep the rubber on the road, and take care out there.


I’m about 6 hrs and 5 mountain passes east of the Coq.
The Coq isn’t all that bad, no worse than any other high mountain pass in BC. Yes they get snow, just like the mountain passes around me, but the difference is ... they have a TV Show... we don’t.
The problem with the Coq is that it is the main East/ West Hwy between Vancouver area and the rest of Canada, and NO BODY slows down no matter the weather.
I live 20 minutes from the Highest Mountain Pass open year round in Canada, that mountain pass is shutdown often during the winter for avalanche control. Everyone around here plan there winter trips so that you are cleaning the Summit by 06:30 as Avalanche control starts “ usually” at 7:00.
Avalanche Control
There are a lot of mountain passes and hills that are worse than the hill going down into Radium Hot Springs, it’s just traveled more often than the ones back here in the Bush... ( grin)
Soup.


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MDKMDK

Canada

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Posted: 07/30/19 03:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

SideHillSoup wrote:

MDKMDK wrote:

Hey Soup, as long as you're not appearing regularly on Jamie Davis' TV show, you must be OK, eh? That Coquihalla Pass is one nasty piece of work. We did the one farther east between Radium HS and Banff along 93 back in 2015. It was a foothill compared to the ones near you, I bet. Keep the rubber on the road, and take care out there.


I’m about 6 hrs and 5 mountain passes east of the Coq.
The Coq isn’t all that bad, no worse than any other high mountain pass in BC. Yes they get snow, just like the mountain passes around me, but the difference is ... they have a TV Show... we don’t.
The problem with the Coq is that it is the main East/ West Hwy between Vancouver area and the rest of Canada, and NO BODY slows down no matter the weather.
I live 20 minutes from the Highest Mountain Pass open year round in Canada, that mountain pass is shutdown often during the winter for avalanche control. Everyone around here plan there winter trips so that you are cleaning the Summit by 06:30 as Avalanche control starts “ usually” at 7:00.
Avalanche Control
There are a lot of mountain passes and hills that are worse than the hill going down into Radium Hot Springs, it’s just traveled more often than the ones back here in the Bush... ( grin)
Soup.

OMG, that avalanche control vid tells me "avoid the Kootenay Pass, if possible, in avalanche season". Better they bring it down under control, than have it come down unexpectedly on some vehicles. You deal with that every year?


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wilber1

Abbotsford B.C.

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Posted: 08/12/19 11:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

cross21114 wrote:

wilber1 wrote:

It's a provincial thing.

BC Regulations

Trailer Brake Requirements
Gross trailer weight of 1,400 kg (3,080 Ibs) or less – Brakes are required if the trailer and its load weigh more than 50% of the licensed weight of the vehicle towing it.
Gross trailer weight of 1,401 kg (3,081 Ibs) to 2,800 kg (6,160 Ibs) – Brakes are required, including a breakaway brake.
Gross trailer weight of more than 2,800 kg (6,160 Ibs) – Brakes are required, and the trailer brakes must be capable of being applied by the driver independently of the towing vehicle's brakes. A surge brake does NOT meet this requirement. A breakaway brake is also required. Brakes are required on all axles.
The sole exemption to this rule is for a 3 axle house trailer, in which case brakes are only required on 2 of the 3 axles.


This could catch those with heavier toads. Do any of the toad braking systems allow independent application of brakes? Also catches me because my brake system is a surge brake.


You would pretty much have to be towing a 3/4 T to be over 6000 lbs.


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Veebyes

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Posted: 08/12/19 11:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yes they must be set to metric standards too. Who comes up with such nonsense. Right up there with how bad the northern roads supposedly are.


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stevemorris

ontario

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Posted: 08/14/19 04:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ontario and quebec are pretty straight forward
any trailer over 2000 lbs must have brakes on ALL wheels and there must a functioning breakaway system
a car on a dolly IS considered a trailer and has the same requirements


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JaxDad

Greater Toronto Area

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Posted: 08/14/19 05:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

stevemorris wrote:

Ontario and quebec are pretty straight forward
any trailer over 2000 lbs must have brakes on ALL wheels and there must a functioning breakaway system
a car on a dolly IS considered a trailer and has the same requirements


The threshold for brakes in Ontario is 3,000 pounds (1,360kg), not 2k.

Car dollies are not trailers and they do not require brakes in Ontario.

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