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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Bunkhouses similar to 272BHS with light hitch weight

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drsteve

Michigan

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Posted: 08/06/19 08:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

librty02 wrote:

And also if you decide on going to look at a 3/4 ton truck you must also watch their payloads. A 3/4 ton gas truck will have a lot more payload than a 3/4 ton diesel truck does. Heck I've looked at some loaded up 3/4 ton diesel trucks before that had payload capacities as low as the 1600 lb range...most don't go over 2100 lbs unless they are less optioned models. So if you would decide on a diesel I would highly recommend a 1 ton as it will have more payload capacity at very little cost difference than the 3/4 ton. But honestly a 3/4 ton gas would fit your bill perfectly and most likely not cost much more than that 1/2 ton Suburban...good luck in your search


Keep in mind that many 3/4 ton trucks these days are essentially SRW one ton trucks with an artificially low 10,000 lb GVWR limit. The reason for 10,000 lb is that in many states, registration costs go up significantly because >10,000 lb means you pay for commercial plates.


2006 Silverado 1500HD Crew Cab 2WD 6.0L 3.73 8600 GVWR
2018 Coachmen Catalina Legacy Edition 223RBS
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troubledwaters

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Posted: 08/06/19 09:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

itsjustjer wrote:

...I understand what you’re saying and that’s fine. My frustration comes from the inability to calculate ANY weight to ANY certain degree seeing as how it’s impossible to know that any weight is actually accurate from the manufacturer. How has anyone ever purchased a vehicle and camper and known they’d be compatible if we can’t rely on payload numbers or tongue weight numbers from the manufacturer?.
Go to the dealer's lot and look at a TT you would like. Look at the sticker on it, it will have a weight on it "As Shipped". Add 1200 lbs to that weight and multiply by 12%; that will give you the tongue weight {close enough; 100 lbs one way or the other ain't going to kill you}.

librty02

Western Pa

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Posted: 08/06/19 10:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

drsteve wrote:

librty02 wrote:

And also if you decide on going to look at a 3/4 ton truck you must also watch their payloads. A 3/4 ton gas truck will have a lot more payload than a 3/4 ton diesel truck does. Heck I've looked at some loaded up 3/4 ton diesel trucks before that had payload capacities as low as the 1600 lb range...most don't go over 2100 lbs unless they are less optioned models. So if you would decide on a diesel I would highly recommend a 1 ton as it will have more payload capacity at very little cost difference than the 3/4 ton. But honestly a 3/4 ton gas would fit your bill perfectly and most likely not cost much more than that 1/2 ton Suburban...good luck in your search


Keep in mind that many 3/4 ton trucks these days are essentially SRW one ton trucks with an artificially low 10,000 lb GVWR limit. The reason for 10,000 lb is that in many states, registration costs go up significantly because >10,000 lb means you pay for commercial plates.


I know for the Ford the 3/4 ton and 1 ton do have different rear axle sizes. They are different in diameter. I've owned both in the past and can tell you that the 1 ton of today will handle a 5th wheels pin weight much more stable than the same exact in a 3/4 ton. The suspension is night and day in the rear.


2011 FORD F-150 FX4 CREW CAB ECO...
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OleManOleCan

Alabama

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Posted: 08/06/19 10:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For Safety sake... Forget about Dry Weight.
The weight you want to count is trailer, water, propane, camping utensils,
Outdoor furniture, Groceries ect...
Don't forget to include things like tool boxes, food and bicycles too.

It's awful easy to load heavy and not realize it.
I eventually upgraded to a 3/4 ton F-250 Diesel and E-rated tires.
Towed like a dream.
Fast Forward to today...
We downsized to a 18' trailer, and our TV downsized to a F-150 HD Echo boost,
I still tow with E-rated tires. I like the way they tow.

FWIW: When I set up my hitch, I like to set it for a loaded Trailer.
I go to a junkyard about 10 miles away and for a case of beer, they move me to the front of any line. Funny how that happens. The junkyard weights my truck , camper ect... Doing it that way you want wonder if you have too much weight on the tongue, or too much weight in the rear. Towes like a dream if you plan ahead.

Acdii

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Posted: 08/13/19 03:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The post above is right, FORGET DRY WEIGHT, it is a useless number unless you want to estimate.

Also Forget looking at any trailer until you do the most important thing. Weigh your tow vehicle! Load it up with the family, and any cargo you assume you will carry in it, and take it to a CAT scale. Pay the $11.50 for the weigh ticket.

Now take your vehicles GVWR and subtract the scale weight from it. That is your available payload. Take that number and divide by .13. That is your available trailer GVWR.

Got all this down?

Great, now go shopping based on the GVWR you calculated.

You don't have it?

Here is an example.

Truck scales at 6000 pounds, GVWR is 6750 pounds, leaving 750 pounds available payload.

750/.13 = 5769

Now you know the max you can tow is 5770 pounds and be right at the limit of the TV.

As others pointed out, 13% tongue weight is smack dab in the middle of the 10-15 % recommended tongue weight, and trust me, you do NOT want to tow a travel trailer with 10% tongue weight. The more weight up front on the ball, the better it handles the wind.

gmckenzie

BC

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Posted: 08/14/19 09:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Acdii wrote:

The post above is right, FORGET DRY WEIGHT, it is a useless number unless you want to estimate.

Also Forget looking at any trailer until you do the most important thing. Weigh your tow vehicle! Load it up with the family, and any cargo you assume you will carry in it, and take it to a CAT scale.


When you do this (and it is excellent advice) either have your WDH hitch with you or take 100 lbs off the payload number you calc out.

100 lbs for the hitch relates to 770 less lb of trailer weight your can pull.


2015 GMC Sierra 4x4 CC SB Max Trailer
2010 Cougar 30RKS

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