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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Equal-izer Hitch Bars

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Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Joined: 04/08/2002

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Posted: 08/13/19 04:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Acdii wrote:

Bigfoot2005 wrote:

Bigfoot2005 wrote:

opnspaces wrote:

Seems like 1200 lb bars to me. I don't think the weight in the bed comes into play.


When you do the calculation on their website they ask for the bed weight i guess because you are transferring weight from the rear axle and anything over the axle adds to the transfer weight


What is the issue with having to stiff of the bars? 1400 versus 1200


I can tell you exactly what the issue will be, Just found this out myself.

I had done some calculations prior to buying my Blue Ox, and had come up with a receiver weight of 1200 pounds. That is the weight of the trailer tongue as well as the hitch itself. So I went and got the 1500 pound BO.

As far as distributing weight, it worked perfectly, transferred everything properly, BUT I could not get the required bar tension for the sway control to function. When I did, it lifted the rear too much, and dropped the front end past the unloaded fender height.

I wound up with having to buy a new set of 1000 pound bars that resolved the issue.

Turns out when I did my calculations I had included adding a rack above the LP tanks to mount an 80 pound Generator, which would have added 130 pounds to the 890 the tongue weighs now, putting me over the 1000 pound mark for tongue weight, but when I finally got around to measuring the A frame to see if the rack would fit, which it wont, I had already bought the BO and set it up.

So no, bigger bars will not work, they cannot be tensioned enough if the weight isn't there, and will not apply the proper sway control.

What is required to get an accurate weight for the spring bars is three things, the weight of the trailer tongue, the weight of the hitch itself, and the weight of anything in the bed behind the rear axle. I never added anything behind the axle, it all fit in front of it, so even though I carry the generator in the bed, it is not carried by the receiver.

Generally, anything carried by the receiver is what you size the bars to, not the hitch. The receiver is that socket under the bumper, not the hitch the trailer connects to, some folks get that part wrong, so just want to make sure it is understood the difference.

If you don't have the trailer and need a rough estimate, take the curb weight, which is the UVW, and add at least 1000-1200 pounds to it for cargo and water, and use that number * 13%. So say the UVW is 5000, like mine, I carry 1500 pounds of cargo, and weigh 6550. 6550 * .13 = 851. Mine is closer to 13.5%, hence 890 pounds.
This is an excellent post.
The integreted sway control hitches rely on TW for the sway control. IOW, proper sizing and setup are important.

This is why I often recommend that newbies start with a standard WD with the add on friction control.
You can miss the setup by a lot with them, and still derive some benefit from it.
Later with more experience and knowledge, they can get a integreted SC if they desire.



Huntindog
100% boondocking
2010 Palomino Sabre 30 BHDS
84 gal. Grey. 84 gal. Black
2 bathrooms, no waiting
2011 Silverado CC DA big dually.



trailer_newbe

Tucson

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Joined: 02/05/2018

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Posted: 08/13/19 09:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Our 28RL is in that 600lb tung weight range (dry) and we are closer to 1,000 lbs. or maybe a little more. I went with the 1,000 Equalizer bars because I want things to flex. No point making the ride uncomfortable and no reason to stress the trailer. Going with a hitch that is rated well above what you will be towing simply causes stresses to occur elsewhere, whether in the cab, or on the trailer frame. Buy a WDH for what your trailer is rated for and don’t go above because it does not add a safety factor. My neighbor has a 28’ Sonoma that is a little heavier than ours towing with the same truck. He’s been using an 800 lbs. WDH for six years and he really likes it.


2018 Jayco White Hawk 28RL

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