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Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > what defines a 3/4 ton?

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JTrac

Oklahoma

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Posted: 08/23/19 10:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GM's new 2500 has a GVWR of 11,350 with the Duramax. That used to be one ton territory.

The old nomenclature may be outdated but it's easier to say I have a 1/2, 3/4, or one ton truck instead of trying to explain I have a Class 1, 2 or 3.


JimT
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ShinerBock

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Posted: 08/23/19 10:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JTrac wrote:

GM's new 2500 has a GVWR of 11,350 with the Duramax. That used to be one ton territory.


And all SRW 3500 trucks used to be under 10k GVWR before 2006 which is 3/4 ton territory.

JTrac wrote:

The old nomenclature may be outdated but it's easier to say I have a 1/2, 3/4, or one ton truck instead of trying to explain I have a Class 1, 2 or 3.


Or you can just say the model/name of the truck.

valhalla360

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Posted: 08/24/19 04:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ShinerBock wrote:

Nothing defines a 3/4 ton. It is not a term used by the industry. It used to be defined by payload decades ago, but not anymore. The term 3/4 is subjective and can change from person to person in its meaning. What does matter is the class the vehicles is in which is based on GVWR. Most 3/4 tons are in class 2b which has a GVWR range from 8,501 to 10,000 lbs.

About a decade a ago, all 3500 SRW trucks were in this class. Now most 350/3500 SRW truck are in class 3 which has a GVWR from 10,001 to 14,000 lbs. There is no law that states a manufacture has to put a 250/2500 truck in class 2b, and they can put them in class 3 if they want just like GM. They can also put a 350/3500 in class 2b like Ford does.

However, the problem with class 3 for commercial fleets is that anything over 10,000 GVWR has added regulation and cost associated with them so it is beneficial for manufacturers to make their GVWR below 10,001 lbs.

So to answer your question. The term 3/4 ton is just an old term that does not mean anything and is used by common folk because they don't know any better. Many still use it because that is what they were taught and they are resistant to change even if it incorrect. It is like the term "weight" many use for oil. It is incorrect, but people have been using it for years and are resistant to change.


Like many terms they start with a technical definition but over time, the term sticks around but the definition may change. It's still standard usage to refer to 1/2, 3/4 and 1 ton trucks.

And yes, you still see manufacturers referring to the highest rated ???? for a 1/2 ton truck in their advertisements and by automotive media when they do testing.

It very much terminology still in use in the modern world.

If you have a 250/2500 series truck and you tell someone you have a 3/4 ton truck, you will get a response appropriate to the truck you have. (If you refer to it as a 2500 series, you will likely get responses that call it a 3/4 ton.)

If you look at the payload on your 1/2 ton truck and call it a 1 ton because it's one of the 1/2 ton trucks with a higher payload, you likely will get incorrect information.

This is all well established and other than people trying to be pedantic, causes no confusion.

Similar example:
- We still call the pedal used to accelerate, the throttle even though diesels and many modern fuel injected cars do not have a traditional throttle.
- It's also often refereed to as the gas pedal...even if it's a diesel engine.

Most people have no idea that "throttle" refers to an engine part but in common usage it's the device that controls engine power.

* This post was edited 08/24/19 05:01am by valhalla360 *


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JRscooby

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Posted: 08/24/19 05:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yes, the ton ratings are out of date. But I remember when somebody mentioned "Super Duty" you knew they where talking about a gas powered class 8 Ford...

ShinerBock

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Posted: 08/24/19 05:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

ShinerBock wrote:

Nothing defines a 3/4 ton. It is not a term used by the industry. It used to be defined by payload decades ago, but not anymore. The term 3/4 is subjective and can change from person to person in its meaning. What does matter is the class the vehicles is in which is based on GVWR. Most 3/4 tons are in class 2b which has a GVWR range from 8,501 to 10,000 lbs.

About a decade a ago, all 3500 SRW trucks were in this class. Now most 350/3500 SRW truck are in class 3 which has a GVWR from 10,001 to 14,000 lbs. There is no law that states a manufacture has to put a 250/2500 truck in class 2b, and they can put them in class 3 if they want just like GM. They can also put a 350/3500 in class 2b like Ford does.

However, the problem with class 3 for commercial fleets is that anything over 10,000 GVWR has added regulation and cost associated with them so it is beneficial for manufacturers to make their GVWR below 10,001 lbs.

So to answer your question. The term 3/4 ton is just an old term that does not mean anything and is used by common folk because they don't know any better. Many still use it because that is what they were taught and they are resistant to change even if it incorrect. It is like the term "weight" many use for oil. It is incorrect, but people have been using it for years and are resistant to change.


Like many terms they start with a technical definition but over time, the term sticks around but the definition may change. It's still standard usage to refer to 1/2, 3/4 and 1 ton trucks.

And yes, you still see manufacturers referring to the highest rated ???? for a 1/2 ton truck in their advertisements and by automotive media when they do testing.

It very much terminology still in use in the modern world.

If you have a 250/2500 series truck and you tell someone you have a 3/4 ton truck, you will get a response appropriate to the truck you have. (If you refer to it as a 2500 series, you will likely get responses that call it a 3/4 ton.)

If you look at the payload on your 1/2 ton truck and call it a 1 ton because it's one of the 1/2 ton trucks with a higher payload, you likely will get incorrect information.

This is all well established and other than people trying to be pedantic, causes no confusion.

Similar example:
- We still call the pedal used to accelerate, the throttle even though diesels and many modern fuel injected cars do not have a traditional throttle.
- It's also often refereed to as the gas pedal...even if it's a diesel engine.

Most people have no idea that "throttle" refers to an engine part but in common usage it's the device that controls engine power.



Manufacturers use the terms externally with customers because most are ignorant to the vehicle class system and would not know what the term class 2B means, and even if you told them what it means they will likely still use the term 3/4 ton because most are resistant to change. They would rather keep doing what they always do even though it is incorrect instead of changing to what is correct.

harmanrk

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Posted: 08/24/19 05:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ShinerBock wrote:

...Most 3/4 tons are in class 2b which has a GVWR range from 8,501 to 10,000 lbs.

About a decade a ago, all 3500 SRW trucks were in this class. Now most 350/3500 SRW truck are in class 3 which has a GVWR from 10,001 to 14,000 lbs. There is no law that states a manufacture has to put a 250/2500 truck in class 2b, and they can put them in class 3 if they want just like GM. They can also put a 350/3500 in class 2b like Ford does.


The only point of contention here is that the F350's are class 2b. SRW are up to 11,500, and DRW well above that. Ford does over a 'paper derate' to 10,000 for the SRW, but that is to address the licensing and other government restrictions of being over 10,000#.

GM is certainly shaking things up with their new release, and pushing the boundaries that had become common. It will be interesting to see how Ford and Ram respond. I think for the most part it just show how they have derated the 250/2500 for a while now.

gbopp

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Posted: 08/24/19 05:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:

But I remember when somebody mentioned "Super Duty" you knew they where talking about a gas powered class 8 Ford...

And if you look back to the early 60's, they were talking about a Pontiac.

RobWNY

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Posted: 08/24/19 07:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lwiddis wrote:

Why isn’t a 2x4 two by four inches?

They are if you buy them rough cut from a mill or from the Amish


Life is a lot like a baseball pitch. Sometimes you get a fast ball down the middle of the plate and sometimes you get a curve ball in the dirt.


Lynnmor

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Posted: 08/24/19 07:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

philh wrote:

If it's payload capacity, then why isn't a properly equipped F150 considered a 3/4 ton truck?


Because it is still a lightweight grocery getter? [emoticon]





Terryallan

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Posted: 08/24/19 08:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

BB_TX wrote:

1/2, 3/4, 1 ton. Those terms are obsolete and have been meaningless for years. But old habits die hard.


Exactly right. It is better if you just go by the manufacturers designation of F150, 1500, F250, 2500, and F350, 3500 series. Those will tell you which is the more heavy duty.

Most F150s, and 1500 series trucks have had more than 3/4 ton of payload for years. After all that is only 1500lbs. few if any (except diesel) F150s, 1500 series have only 1/2 ton, or 1000lb of payload.


Terry & Shay
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