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Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > what defines a 3/4 ton?

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spud1957

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Posted: 08/29/19 07:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just to add to the confusion, word on the street the 2020 F350 will have a max GVWR of 12,400. Same truck as 2019 but now they add an add'l 900 lbs. Go figure.

* This post was edited 08/29/19 03:42pm by spud1957 *

Bedlam

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Posted: 08/29/19 07:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've always thought of a half ton truck as using many parts you would find in a full sized body on frame sedan and utilizing a semi floating axle. Now that the few remaining large sedans are mostly uni-body and there are many more uni-body SUV's, I still see some crossover of parts.

Looking at the three quarter ton and larger trucks, I expect a full floating axle, heavier frame, and larger capacity brakes.


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ShinerBock

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Posted: 08/29/19 08:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bedlam wrote:

I've always thought of a half ton truck as using many parts you would find in a full sized body on frame sedan and utilizing a semi floating axle. Now that the few remaining large sedans are mostly uni-body and there are many more uni-body SUV's, I still see some crossover of parts.

Looking at the three quarter ton and larger trucks, I expect a full floating axle, heavier frame, and larger capacity brakes.



That is actually why many in the GM and Ford forums say that they 2500LD and F250 light duty was not a 3/4 ton. Both had semi-floating axles just like the Titan XD does now which is also in the same class as most other class 2B trucks. However, many others disagreed saying that it was a 3/4 ton.

JRscooby

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Posted: 08/29/19 08:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ShinerBock wrote:


Yes, it is opinion. Just go to the GM forums and see them debate whether a 2500LD was actually a 3/4 ton. Half say yes, and half say no. Then there is the Ford light duty F250. Half say it was a 3/4 ton and half say no. Then their is the F350 that gets de-rated into a 10k GVWR. Most say it is still a 1 ton while others say it is now 3/4 ton. Then there is the F250 with the camper package which essentially gave you the exact same truck, suspension and all, as an F350, but with an F250 badge. Some say it is still a 3/4 ton because of the 250 badge and others say it is a 1 ton because it has the exact same components as the F350.

So yes, it is all opinion.


Friend of mine had a cab fire in a old F-750. A few weeks later, one of his F-250s was rear ended hard. Then he needed to downsize his company, sell a bunch of equipment. We put the cab off the 250 on the other truck. Weight watcher looks at cab ID number, no issue for no CDL...

ShinerBock

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Posted: 08/29/19 08:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

JRscooby wrote:



Friend of mine had a cab fire in a old F-750. A few weeks later, one of his F-250s was rear ended hard. Then he needed to downsize his company, sell a bunch of equipment. We put the cab off the 250 on the other truck. Weight watcher looks at cab ID number, no issue for no CDL...


LOL!!!

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Posted: 08/29/19 08:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Since these topics always become a discussion of overall confusion, let's throw this in too: remember back when for instance, a Chevy 1/2 ton was called a C10 ? Well, then we got "heavy half", and from that I suspect is where the marketing dept took it and ran with it, and started calling the 1/2 ton a 1500, So of course everybody else had to follow suit, or be lost in the rating wars.

If I remember correctly, at the time, moving the designation up to a "heavy half" had some implications regarding either meeting safety regs or emissions regs.

Bedlam

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Posted: 08/29/19 08:22am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I wonder if the heavy half tons were the first ones to to have a GVWR over 6000 lbs which put them into Class 2. The 60's trucks (like a C10 or F100) only weighed about 3000 lbs when empty.

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Posted: 08/29/19 08:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

To make it even more confusing. Back when these terms actually meant something, Ford F series trucks were names F-1, F-2, F-3, and F-4. The Ford changed their naming and the F-1 "1/4 ton"(or 1/2 ton depending on who you ask) became the F100. The F-2 "1/2 ton"(or light 3/4 ton depending on who you ask) and F-3 "3/4 ton" (or heavy 3/4 ton depending on who you ask) both became the F250. The F-4 "1 ton" became the F350. Ford later started making the F150 as their " heavy 1/2 ton" along with the F100. The F100 was discontinued years later.

For a long time, GM didn't even use numbers for most of their trucks. They had names like Apache for light duty trucks, Viking for medium duty trucks, and Spartan for heavy duty trucks. Many of the trucks that did have numbers didn't coincide with their payload like the 3100, 3800, and 9310. So saying that the Asian trucks not using the numbers system is not the norm was actually the norm for some US makes back in the day.

* This post was edited 08/29/19 09:19am by ShinerBock *

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Posted: 08/29/19 09:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What I am most concerned with my trucks is axle and tire rating, GVWR, and what level I have to register it.

For instance, in my state, I have to run a 12K plate on my Frontier, because with the funfinder hooked to it, I weigh 8500 combined. Because of that, I cannot run just a 6K plate. If I never towed anything with it, I could run a 6K registration.

The reason we "pay" for the weight of the trailer in the truck plate is because our trailers get a "permanent" (one time) plate, and the cost of that registration is basically just a paperwork cost.

If you look under the rear of a F350 SRW vs a DRW, the pieces and parts are the same, yet the DRW has a much higher axle and gross rating. The limiting factor on the SRW is the tire capacity. My dually has a 9K axle rating, where the same truck that year in a single was 6K.

The payload on my F350 is 4800 pounds. So I guess that makes it a nearly two and half ton truck. Sometimes when running empty, I think that's an appropriate designation !

I suppose eventually people will drop this idea of calling these trucks out as half ton, one ton, etc. Old habits die hard.

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Posted: 08/29/19 12:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If I want to get groceries and a few bags of snowmelt plus some landscaping blocks, I use the Toyota Tundra

If I want to tow the boat, or the 23' flatbed with ATV's or sno-gos, I use the (new, yay!) F250 (replacing the soon to be dearly departed Chev 2500HD)

If I want to haul 3.5 yards of gravel, or tow the dozer around, I use the F550

One of those is a 1/2 ton, one's a 3/4 ton, and one's medium duty. Darned if I care about which is which, I just look at what I want to carry before I pick the truck....even if I sometimes mistakenly pull the boat with the Toyota.


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