RV.Net Open Roads Forum: What do I need to start this?

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  Class C

 > What do I need to start this?

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
maillemaker

office

Senior Member

Joined: 09/08/2009

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/09/19 11:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a 1990 Winnebago Warrior built on the E350 chassis.

We bought it about 10 years ago for $7500. We probably paid too much for it then.

First off, the cab air did not work. This was about $800 to repair and the system had to be converted from R12 to R134a.

Then I learned about date codes on tires. RVs almost never get enough miles on them to wear out the tread of the tires. Instead, they age out. 10 years is the maximum you should push a tire. When we bought our RV, the back 4 tires were 10 years old, the front 2 were 6 years old, and the spare was 19 years old. I replaced them all. $1100.

Then we discovered that the generator, which we ran when we were looking at it to buy it, would only run about 20 minutes and then shut down. Another $500.

The skylight in our model year has a design flaw in that it leaks water in the roof. I have seen this in our "twins" when we see them around. This rotted out the shower wall and had run across the ceiling and rotted the bathroom wall. I ripped it all out and rebuilt it.

The rubber roof has been coated in Heng's Roof Sealant and so is no longer easily reparable, nor are any of the things on the roof. I just slathered on another coat. Hopefully the roof no longer leaks. We keep it under covered storage to protect it as long as we can.

The sides of our RV have "delamination" from water intrusion around the windows. You don't have this problem as your RV has aluminum sides.

Over the 10 years we have had it I've had to replace control boards in the fridge and water heater, and engine work, replace the radiator, water pump, distributor, temperature sensor, and more. I've probably spent $3000 in repairs over the last 10 years.

But, we use the heck out of it. It's been on 1400 mile round trips to Disney World at least 5 times. It's been on a similar trip to Virginia. I use it just about every month.

I'd say it probably was not a smart purchase, and I would have been better off buying a $15K RV, but, I didn't have $15K and probably never will have that kind of savings. So, it was settle for less and "pay as you go" or nothing.

Just to give you some background on someone else with an ancient RV.

Now, to your situation.

You have to have a dedicated engine battery for the engine to run. Yes, my RV has 2-way rocker switch. If you press and hold it one way, it will temporarily gang the house batter to the engine battery to give you an emergency jump start. But as soon as you let go the switch your engine is back on its own battery. So you must have one for the engine. If you flip the switch the other way, the engine will charge the house batteries. Also don't run the generator and have that switch flipped or you'll fry your voltage regulator.

If your house battery is good, you should be able to physically disconnect it and install it as an engine battery, if it fits in the same space available for the engine battery.

From the 2 pictures of yours I can view, your RV looks to have major water damage and is structurally unsound. I would be very concerned about driving it on the road and having walls literally fall off of it.

Rot is always worse than what you can see. Were you to start pulling things apart, you would find that much more is rotted than what you are able to currently see.

There are threads on this forum where people have done full-on restorations - pulling off walls and completely re-building them. People have re-built roofs, and re-built the cab-over bunk section. If you search you can see them.

It is a huge, huge, huge undertaking. Firstly you better live in the country or someplace or have a big shop where you can do this kind of work out of the elements.

But you are probably looking at a year or more of work, and thousands of dollars, and at the end, are you going to have some highly desirable collectors item? No.

You will find a lot of people on this forum that are clearly rich and driving $50K+ rigs who will scoff at you and say, "just buy a new RV!" or somesuch. I'm not one of those. Clearly I am the champion of the poor man's RV.

But, I think your RV is probably beyond saving.

Post some more pictures?


1990 Winnebago Warrior. "She may not look like much but she's got it where it counts!"



T18skyguy

Eugene, OR

Senior Member

Joined: 12/13/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 09/09/19 05:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If your able to remove those green faces from pic 3 and 4 we could probably open those links. Or just repost without those faces. I would agree that you might as well get as much enjoyment out of it as possible, there's a lot of time and money in the project, but if you've got it, I wouldn't discourage you.


Retired Anesthetist. LTP. Pilot with mechanic/inspection ratings. 2017 Jayco Greyhawk 31FS. Wife and daughter. Three cats which we must obey.

ron.dittmer

North-East Illinois

Senior Member

Joined: 02/26/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/09/19 11:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Loki,

I did not read through the other replies.

I was able to look at the first two pictures. I get the feeling that the house will end up being a chassis-up restoration.

Years ago, one guy on this forum bought something in similar condition. He posted his restoration for nearly a year. It was one continuous stream of surprises for him. At one point the walls were just studs (all replaced studs), the roof 100% brand new wood and tarp'd, and the wood sub floor was removed. He did a lot of welding to the framing supporting the floor and restoring/cleaning/painting of iron work, appliances and such. Then he started building things back up, rewiring inside the walls and such. Then we never heard from him again.

I always wondered what happened. He did have a long way to go. I assume he just gave up.

His posts were very entertaining with detailed descriptions and included many pictures. It appeared there was nothing that did not need restoration of some kind. The structure of the house itself seemed to be 100% new material.

Expect that if your plan is to make things right. If not, you may do a lot better by driving it over to your local junk yard for scrap value. If the chassis is perfect, strip off the entire house, build a solid deck, weld on a rear cab wall, and sell the vehicle as a flat bed hauler.

I wish my reply could have offered encouragement.


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


T18skyguy

Eugene, OR

Senior Member

Joined: 12/13/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 09/10/19 09:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

If the chassis is perfect, strip off the entire house, build a solid deck, weld on a rear cab wall, and sell the vehicle as a flat bed hauler.


Thats some good practical advice. You might actually make money on it when you sell it.

LokiSukaido

Pennsylvania

New Member

Joined: 09/08/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/11/19 09:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

T18skyguy wrote:

Quote:

If the chassis is perfect, strip off the entire house, build a solid deck, weld on a rear cab wall, and sell the vehicle as a flat bed hauler.


Thats some good practical advice. You might actually make money on it when you sell it.


The irony is, I could actually use a flat bed hauler. lol [emoticon]

Bordercollie

Garden Grove, CA, USA

Senior Member

Joined: 03/07/2002

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/12/19 11:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

People on forums often don't want to discourage unrealistic DIY projects. If the poster's objective is to have a safe and fully working RV, at a reasonable cost, in a reasonable amount of time, and has the tools, various skills, workspace, health and help available, major renovation may be practical. Some of our members might have enough of the prerequisites to make major RV renovations practical.

77rollalong

Brighton Ontario

Senior Member

Joined: 02/03/2018

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/13/19 04:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It would be a big project, but if you have the time and the skill set and tools it can be done.. we bought our 1977 26 foot motorhome 3 years ago used id a couple of times and found major rot in the body and over the winter rebuilt it, replacing all the walls and the complete roof structure. We are now into the second year with the rebuilt body and have only had minor problems , like having to replace the 12V power supply, and a couple of u-joints on the drive shaft..[image]
this is some of the work to the rear.
this is after the new filon siding[image]
the replacement side with the new decals
[image]

LokiSukaido

Pennsylvania

New Member

Joined: 09/08/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/14/19 01:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you, everyone. Now, I have another question. Is there anywhere I can get "blueprints" of the 'house', for my RV? I want to have something planned, in the event that a total gut/resto job is needed. Currently, I am not near the RV, so I can't take the measurements, myself. I was wondering if there was anywhere that would give me the needed info to draft up an idea on paper, or online...sort of like autoCAD or something.

77rollalong

Brighton Ontario

Senior Member

Joined: 02/03/2018

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/14/19 01:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

blue prints I doubt you will find any sort of blue prints for your rv...
I ended up just taking measurements off the old wood and doing one section at a time and going on to the next.. once the interior panel and the framing is up is the it does not take much time.. Ours took from the end of September to mid may to complete.. with not too much done over the winter...[image] then having to wait to get the siding for it at the beginning of the year, as it was a 12 hour round trip, I didnt want to try in a snow storm or freezing rain ..

LokiSukaido

Pennsylvania

New Member

Joined: 09/08/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/17/19 04:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you all for your help, so far. But, I'm in need of a few more answers. I've been searching online for either the actual vehicle weight, or a relatively affordable way to tow her. I don't have AAA, yet. I know, I know. It's on my list. Anyway, I'm just trying to get her home. She's currently about 40 miles away. And, the last guy I talked to that said he'd tow it quoted me $400 for the 40 mile trip. Any suggestions? I've already looked at uhaul.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  Class C

 > What do I need to start this?
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:

© 2019 CWI, Inc. © 2019 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved. | Terms of Use | PRIVACY POLICY | YOUR PRIVACY RIGHTS