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Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Tire cables or chains

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Darryl&Rita

Grande Prairie, Alberta

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Posted: 09/25/19 08:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you need to put chains on an RV, you've made some bad life choices. They're hard on tires, bodywork and the body of the guy putting them on. That said, the laws of the land do require them to travel, so get the cheapest, lightest ones you can find, to meet the minimum standards of the law.


***UPDATE 2006 3500 SRW MegaCab pulling a 2007 fleetwood 5'er

mikim

Rancho Cucamonga, CA USA

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Posted: 09/25/19 09:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We go skiing in Mammoth & Tahoe every year. Had to put chains on the Motorhome's 5 times over the past 30 years. Used link chains as they were the cheapest and never had to use them for more than 10 miles. Kept speed down to below 35 mph.

YOU WILL GET WET!! I lay down on a blue tarp and wear ski pants. Not hard, but practice beforehand. It will be a rough ride.





memtb

Wyoming

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Posted: 09/25/19 08:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

bbeezzz wrote:

How many folks carry tire chains or cables for their motor home? Our Winnebago Sunstar is 18000 pounds and we are planning to travel mid October from Calgary to Spokane then further west to the coast and south to California.


We carry cables for our class c and for our 5th wheel. Lightweight, don’t take up much room, and inexpensive. Don’t really want to use them.....but I like to have an insurance policy! Cables work great on ice and shallow snow, don’t beat you to death when using them. Chains generally are best for mud or deeper snow....not saying that they shouldn’t or can’t be used at any time. For highway use, I just prefer cables.

As we do a bit of fall/winter boondocking, we have light duty , v-bar chains for our 5er and heavy duty, large link, mud chains (off road chains) for the truck!

I keep a small piece of “Astro-Turf” to lay down on. It doesn’t slide around like a vinyl tarp, yet keeps you clean and dry! memtb


Todd & Marianne
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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 09/25/19 09:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Darryl&Rita wrote:

If you need to put chains on an RV, you've made some bad life choices. They're hard on tires, bodywork and the body of the guy putting them on. That said, the laws of the land do require them to travel, so get the cheapest, lightest ones you can find, to meet the minimum standards of the law.


That first sentence is classic!

Btw, agree, cables for show, chains for go.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

blt2ski

Kirkland, Wa

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Posted: 09/29/19 11:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've found the diamond chains to be easiest to put on. Traction like a link, install like a cable. Don;t generally speaking have to lay out chains, drive on them, hook up. Can do all the above in one place. ALL versions one should drive a few hundred yards, check tension, then do so every so often to make sure they are tight. Otherwise as noted, if too loose, they fall off, tear up the rig etc.

From Nov 1 to April 1, ALL rigs over a total of 10K lbs, be it a single rig, or towing, are required to carry the appropriate quantity of chains for the rig in Washington state.

I would suggest a chain you know will work, as you can not always trust mother nature, or your days of travel! You may get caught in a freak snow storm, and your ability to wait it out is not legal, or no place to truly wait it out. I was at Timberline in the parking lot, a place I have stayed and been many times in the winter, 60 mph winds, blowing snow into every nook and cranny of window vents etc. Put chains on truck and trainer, down that 10% grade I went to Government camp, spent the rest of the weekend in a parking lot down there. If traveling in the winter, be safe over sorry. Putting on chains is not that big a deal.
This is from a person that used my RV trailer as a ski hut, not a summmer vacation traveling home! Hence the license plate I had too "SKIHT46" or truck plate, see handle!

Marty


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CFerguson

on the road

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Posted: 09/30/19 11:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Heartily disagree on the snarky 'bad life choices' comment. Some of us LOVE the snow and winter sports. Of course, you have to be careful and know the limitations of your rig AND yourself.
Don't apply your standards to everyone elses' abilities.

ol Bombero-JC

USA

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Posted: 10/08/19 01:37am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

bbeezzz wrote:

How many folks carry tire chains or cables for their motor home? Our Winnebago Sunstar is 18000 pounds and we are planning to travel mid October from Calgary to Spokane then further west to the coast and south to California.


Seems you (or your brother) posted the same question on the SKPs forums.
Received good answers - if not you, go there and search "chains".

Check with the DOT(s) for the states you will be traveling through - for the requirements as well as which type/s of chains are acceptable.

Req's may also include date you are req'd to "have" chains with you.

The state DOTs are lots more reliable than folks on an internet site..[emoticon]

~

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 10/08/19 02:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CFerguson wrote:

Heartily disagree on the snarky 'bad life choices' comment. Some of us LOVE the snow and winter sports. Of course, you have to be careful and know the limitations of your rig AND yourself.
Don't apply your standards to everyone elses' abilities.


I thought it was pretty funny! I'd say more tongue in cheek than snarky, lol.
I love the snow too, forgot to get offended at the comment though. When my buddy stops his Moho to put on chains to get up to the snopark, I try to be just far enough behind him on I 90 so I can try to douse him with slush as I drive by!

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