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campigloo

Baton Rouge, La

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Posted: 10/04/19 11:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well the family is insisting on a trip to the eastern side. I’m sure there will plenty of things to see but I’m wondering about crowds in NS, NB and Edward island. To
those that have been in that area in the summer, how is it? Will reservations be critical? I’m looking at a couple of apps but not seeing much, are there boondocking places available?
Thanks!

MDKMDK

Canada

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Posted: 10/04/19 12:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

June 1 to Labor Day, reservations will get you closer to where you want to be, wherever that might be.
Many of the typical (Walmart, etc.) free overnight stops have been eliminated due to regular abuse over time.
There are few roadside rest areas, or truck stops along our freeways, like on your Eisenhower Interstate system.
We have some National Parks that can be explored online at the Parks Canada website, and there will also be Provincial Parks in some areas, that can be explored online at the various provincial websites under tourism.
You can also use google to find "public private commercial RV Parks and Campgrounds near ?????????" and that usually pulls up a list of more than a few, if you're just looking for accommodations.


Mike.
2018 (2017 Sprinter Cab Chassis) Navion24V + 2016 JKU (sold @ ????)
2016 Sunstar 26HE, V10, 3V, 6 Speed (sold @ 4600 miles)
2002 Roadtrek C190P (sold @ 315,000kms)

IB853347201

Eastern Ontario

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Posted: 10/04/19 12:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you're looking for a great base camp to tour Prince Edward Island from, check out Twin Shores Camping Area. One of the best full serve RV parks on PEI. Fantastic beaches. Reservations a must!
https://www.twinshores.com

winniman

muskoka Ontario

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Posted: 10/04/19 02:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have been to the east coast four times. We have never made advance reservations, but if you are planning on staying in one place for several weeks, you might want to. As far as boondocking, there are some places, but they are few and far between. It depends on how big a rig you have. The iOverlander app shows some boondocking spots. We have a 38 ft rig with tow car, and many of the places listed on the app are for smaller rvs. We did stay at a few places listed in the app, as well as some Walmarts. Places like Peggys Cove have a very narrow road going to them, and little to no parking for rvs. I recommend a tow car for visiting places like Peggys Cove, Lunenburg, Halifax etc. Also the tow car is a must to go around The Cabot Trail in Cape Breton. Very scenic highway, but not recommended to take your rv around it. It has very steep hills. I myself really enjoy the high tides of the Bay of Fundy. That is what keeps me going back over and over. Hopewell Rocks, NB, are a must see, as well as try to catch the tidal bore at South Maitland, NS. You can also see it at Truro NS, but South Maitland is probably the best at the tidal bore interpretation centre. Burntcoat Head is the highest tides in the world. Digby Harbour, Halls Harbour are two in Nova Scotia that you can see the high tides changing. Alma in New Brunswick is a cute harbour, and is close to the Fundy NP. PEI has lots of beaches, as well as the Confederation Bridge. It is free to get on the island, but cost $45.50 for a car, and $8.75 per extra axle to cross the bridge. You can also take the ferry over for free, but it is more expensive than the bridge to return to the mainland.

campigloo

Baton Rouge, La

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Posted: 10/04/19 05:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks y’all. That helps!

Crowe

Merrimack, NH

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Posted: 10/04/19 06:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Fundy National Park is beautiful-hopefully it's in better repair than than it was about 10 years ago. They have a number of campgrounds in the park-big rigs can fit at Headquarters CG. If you go there be sure to visit the bakery in the town of Alma, located at one of the park entrances. Go to Hopewell Rocks for formations but watch the tides. See the tidal bore in St. John or somewhere near there. There are also some amusement type parks in that area. On PEI head to Charlottetown, the capital. It's just a pretty place with shopping and dining. Head to the College of Piping in Summerside for a performance by the students or a guest performer. Nova Scotia has beautiful scenery and the Alexander Graham Bell museum in Baddock. How much time you have and what you like to do will help decide where to go.

I'm a planner so I always make reservations. I don't think the crowds there are any worse or better than most tourist areas. Keep in mind that Canada Day on July 1 is similar to our July 4th-locals come out of the woodwork to celebrate.


I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be Douglas Adams

RV-less for now but our spirits are still on the open road.

Little Kopit

TheMaritimes.ca

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Posted: 10/05/19 07:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yes, it is Prince Edward Island. To cross is free, you pay coming back and the bridge is less that the ferry.

A) NB, NS, & PEI together are called "The Maritimes".

B) Those 3 plus NL - Newfoundland and Labrador - are called Atlantic Canada.

I lived in NL for 25 years. The Maritimes, now up to 16 years. Gros Morne National Park has Cabot Trail bested by many choices. Many ways to go. & going one way up Cabot Trail to northern Cape Breton Island is very good.

Add in the islands between NB and Maine Very much worth it.

Go to google: put in 'name of province & tourism'. Either send for tourist guide or call to tell them your special interests.

Have fun.

[emoticon])


& I, I took the road less travelled by.

My Photo Album, featuring Labrador 2006


jensenst

Black Mountain NC

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Posted: 10/12/19 08:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We just spent the all of Aug in the PEI ND NS and Quebec. You need to be on the Canadian Nat Parks website in January to make reservations. We stayed 4 days in Fundy Nat park. 4 days in Cape Breton national park in Cheticamp camp ground and 7 days in PEI cavendish nat park right on the beach. All of these parks had Full hookup sites. The sites are cheap with the dollar being so strong.

rr2254545

Central Minnesota

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Posted: 10/17/19 09:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

winniman wrote:

I have been to the east coast four times. We have never made advance reservations, but if you are planning on staying in one place for several weeks, you might want to. As far as boondocking, there are some places, but they are few and far between. It depends on how big a rig you have. The iOverlander app shows some boondocking spots. We have a 38 ft rig with tow car, and many of the places listed on the app are for smaller rvs. We did stay at a few places listed in the app, as well as some Walmarts. Places like Peggys Cove have a very narrow road going to them, and little to no parking for rvs. I recommend a tow car for visiting places like Peggys Cove, Lunenburg, Halifax etc. Also the tow car is a must to go around The Cabot Trail in Cape Breton. Very scenic highway, but not recommended to take your rv around it. It has very steep hills. I myself really enjoy the high tides of the Bay of Fundy. That is what keeps me going back over and over. Hopewell Rocks, NB, are a must see, as well as try to catch the tidal bore at South Maitland, NS. You can also see it at Truro NS, but South Maitland is probably the best at the tidal bore interpretation centre. Burntcoat Head is the highest tides in the world. Digby Harbour, Halls Harbour are two in Nova Scotia that you can see the high tides changing. Alma in New Brunswick is a cute harbour, and is close to the Fundy NP. PEI has lots of beaches, as well as the Confederation Bridge. It is free to get on the island, but cost $45.50 for a car, and $8.75 per extra axle to cross the bridge. You can also take the ferry over for free, but it is more expensive than the bridge to return to the mainland.


We are going too thank you for your excellent info Winniman


2012 Winnebago Journey 36M Cummins 360
2014 Jeep Cherokee, Air Force One, Blue Ox Avail tow bar
354 Campgrounds,80K miles driven in our Winnebago motor homes and 1710 nights camping since we retired in July 2009


PartyOf Five

Wheaton, IL

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Posted: 10/27/19 03:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There's history in these areas: maritime museum is worth taking out a few hours for in Halifax. Also note the shift from French to English as you leave Quebec and go into the Atlantic provinces- this is because of 400 years of history. Marconi and Bell are worth a Google search, both are national historic sites. Don't forget to get off the fast roads to enjoy the drive, but we're seeing more construction than wildlife as we drive through.


Da Moose:2001 31' E450. 30k in 3yrs.
PartyOf5: Driver's DW & 3 pre-teens -trying to connect, learn, appreciate creation & the Creator
May you find Peace in all that you endeavor

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