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 > Repair costs and frequency frustration

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Jayco-noslide

Galesburg,Il., USA

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Posted: 10/12/19 10:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Appreciate all comments. Forgot to mention; there is a bearing noise so I don't doubt the need. I actually don't have a cost estimate yet but will get one at an alignment shop in a day or so which works on a lot of motor homes. We've decided to proceed with the repair, use it for our snowbird trip, meanwhile looking at downsize alternatives, then decide. Additional factor is that I'm 76 and sometimes would like to simplify, downsize and eliminate a TOAD.


Jayco-noslide

westernrvparkowner

montana

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Posted: 10/12/19 12:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jayco-noslide wrote:

Appreciate all comments. Forgot to mention; there is a bearing noise so I don't doubt the need. I actually don't have a cost estimate yet but will get one at an alignment shop in a day or so which works on a lot of motor homes. We've decided to proceed with the repair, use it for our snowbird trip, meanwhile looking at downsize alternatives, then decide. Additional factor is that I'm 76 and sometimes would like to simplify, downsize and eliminate a TOAD.
Eliminating a toad will do little simplify. Every time you need a cup of sugar you are going to have to break camp. That means more than just disconnecting. Every dish, glass and loose item inside the rig will have to be stowed. You now owe me two cents.

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 10/12/19 01:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

Jayco-noslide wrote:

We like our 15 year old 30 ft. Class C we've had for 7 years. Reliability has always been up and down. We had a pretty good couple of years of repair costs we could live with but now we're discouraged and don't know what to do. Many costs this past year; some routine and expected, some not. Must have totaled 7 to $8000 and today, after $300 dollars of work, I'm told that I need a differential bearing which this shop can't do which will cost thousands; not hundreds. Only has 67000 miles. We're reluctantly considering downsizing to an older used Class B, like a Roadtrek but seems like we would have to repair our present one to sell it. I'm not asking for an answer; just venting. Oh, spending over $30000 for a replacement is out of the question. Thanks for "listening"


I'm guessing that your Class C is probably (not a Super C) based on a Ford E350 or E450 chassis - in which parts and mechanics are available everywhere.

If it is ... wouldn't it be least expensive to merely have a used (from a junkyard, reclamation yard, etc.) whole rear axle and differential - as a complete assembly - installed to replace the original one?

Probably way less labor than messing with disassembling an installed differential merely to replace it's bearings.


And the cost to locate, remove and replace the entire unit?
A qualified competent mechanic can easily replace the bearings and not for thousands, that’s just ridiculous.
What exactly are the symptoms.

Bordercollie

Garden Grove, CA, USA

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Posted: 10/12/19 02:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We spent around $12K recently getting our 15 year old Tioga 26Q ready and reliable for camping and touring after it had sat mostly un-driven during our surgery and recover problems for 8 years. Was it cost-effective?, maybe not
but it had previously had the fridge and other expensive replacements and repairs made and only has some 10K miles on the odometer. We could afford it, so we took a deep breath and had it all done including new tires and house batteries. Recommend you get rear-end noise diagnosed by truck repair mechanics and get estimates. I'd be surprised if your rear end work exceeds $2K. I wonder if there is possible Ford warranty coverage for differentials? Anyway, if you will use and enjoy the rig, recommend you spend the repair money or spend the money and sell it, if your interest in "the lifestyle" has diminished.

Road Treks are quite expensive but are also useful for transportation , local days at the park, and short nearby camping trips or touring as desired. Nice to take to theme parks, airshows, and kids activities. We loved our 1972 Dodge Van camper conversion, very versatile, kept it into the 90's.

* This post was edited 10/12/19 02:17pm by Bordercollie *

bobndot

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Posted: 10/12/19 03:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

westernrvparkowner wrote:

You now owe me two cents.


[emoticon]

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 10/12/19 08:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jayco-noslide wrote:

Appreciate all comments. Forgot to mention; there is a bearing noise so I don't doubt the need. I actually don't have a cost estimate yet but will get one at an alignment shop in a day or so which works on a lot of motor homes. We've decided to proceed with the repair, use it for our snowbird trip, meanwhile looking at downsize alternatives, then decide. Additional factor is that I'm 76 and sometimes would like to simplify, downsize and eliminate a TOAD.


We started and have remained "downsized" ... touring and camping in only a 24 foot Class C with no slides and no toad. It's fine for the two of us during several trips per year (we're not full-timers).

We just returned from over a 3-week tour in the West - we left home fully stocked and had to shop only twice once during the trip for some grocery restocking - which is easy in parking lots with only a 24 foot Class C. Stopping for fast foot lunches in crowded parking lots is also simple. Our longest trips in it have been 9-week and 10-week multi-thousand mile tours of the U.S.. Alaska is next on our long-trip list using our Class C.

Since our rig is small, it's way easier and less resource consumptive to keep it warm and keep it cool. We take showers in it and wash our small dog in it's shower stall, too.

A small RV can be the only way to go for really hassle-free comfortable RVing.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

dicknellen

Fallon Nevada

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Posted: 10/13/19 12:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We went from a 30' class C with 2 slides to a 20' Pleasure Way Class B. Very bad mistake. Sold our Toad. Sold Pleasure Way, purchased 24V Class C Winnie no slide love it, purchased a new toad. Can either travel with or without toad, usually take toad. Before you make the mistake I did, rent a B for a trip. Dick

Bordercollie

Garden Grove, CA, USA

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Posted: 10/14/19 11:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

No wonder many RV owners try to make their own repairs and upgrades to avoid the cost of labor and markups on parts prices. I wonder whether RV repairs are treated like foreign and luxury car repairs with the assumption that RV owners are "well healed" and can afford high prices. I accept that RV repair places and truck mechanics have to make money and have overhead to consider but wonder why the labor in simply replacing a battery, etc. is so expensive.

Gjac

Milford, CT

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Posted: 10/14/19 03:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

carringb wrote:

Gjac wrote:

I have owned my current class A in my signature for 16 years, I have put $21,000 for mods repairs and maintenance.


But if you bought a new coach, you'd lost more than that the day you drove off the lot! And probably that much again in interest that first year, if you had to finance a new one.

And... while the chassis have improved, I think coach construction quality and mechanical durability has down in the last 15 years.
Your right Bryan,case in point my friend has bought 3 MH's in the last 16 years, his depreciation loss alone would pay for a new MH, not to mention the multiple trips back to the dealer to fix warranty items and the loss of a camping season. I don't think $1000-$1500 a year is bad for total cost of maintenance, improvements and repairs for a Class A or C. I just think it would be much less with a truck and small trailer combo.

toedtoes

California

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Posted: 10/14/19 03:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I remember when I needed the door handle contraption replaced on my Durango. The dealer priced it at about $400 in labor. As soon as they told me, I called an independent shop I usually go to and asked their labor cost for the repair. $75 at max. I immediately turned around and told the dealer to not fix it. They had already removed the contraption - not five minutes. In less than another five minutes they had put the old "broken" one back on and I was on my way.

Their labor rate was approx. $100 an hour. So for a 10 minute job they were going to charge me 4 hours of labor.

My independent shop charges $75 an hour with a minimum 1/2 hour labor charge. They acknowledged it was less than an hour's job and were going to charge me accordingly.

In the end, the door contraption only needed a shake because when they put it back on, it worked fine.

I learned after that, that labor costs get inflated way beyond the time frame. If I go someplace new, I stay there for the repair and watch how long they actually work on the vehicle and compare that against the labor charge. If it is within 30 minutes difference, I'm good. If more than that I don't return ever.

My independent shop will often drop off a bit of labor costs because I am a longtime regular customer. They also will tell me if my picking up the part and bringing it in will save on markup. On my side, I don't give them a bad time if they can't get to my vehicle right away and I don't whinge about the costs. We both win.


1975 American Clipper RV with Dodge 360 (photo in profile)
1998 American Clipper Fold n Roll Folding Trailer
Both born in Morgan Hill, CA to Irv Perch (Daddy of the Aristocrat trailers)

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