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Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > 2WD or 4X4 for a truck camper

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specta

utah

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Posted: 11/01/19 07:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jaycocreek wrote:



The point of this thread was do you need 4X4 with a truck camper on?..

Why,because these big/heavy and wide truck campers are not meant to be off roading..They make the front end lite going up a grade and are to wide to maneuver in the mountains..



Your point, no you don't "need" a 4wd with a camper on it. Need and want are two different things.

In several situations low range has advantages over a truck with no low-range, especially if the truck has an automatic transmission. Nope still don't need it but it makes things nicer.

I've never experienced the problem you listed above.

No, campers are not meant for "off-roading". Who would want to take one "off-roading??

Mountain dirt roads are not "off-roading".

I wouldn't want to haul a camper on that old Chevy of your's either. Not even on the highway.


Kenny
2011 Chevy 2500 HD 6.0L 4wd
Regular cab. The best looking trucks.
1995 Lance 945 Onan QG 2500 LP
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specta

utah

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Posted: 11/01/19 07:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:

my RWD took me up that 14% forest road just fine and it even did not use LSD I have.

[image]


14% is nothing. I've been up steeper driveways than that.

Is your LSD manually or electrically engaged?

Without the wheels spinning how do you know it wasn't engaged?
Pressure from both wheels is what engages the clutches.

jimh425

Western MT

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Posted: 11/01/19 08:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I’m not sure what constitutes need since there is no way to know what might happen on a trip.

Last February, I left the ranch when there wasn’t any snow forecast. We were going to be back in a few days. Just headed over for a grandkids birthday. The forecast changed and snowmageden set into Western WA.

We had to wait at my daughters for the snow to settle down so we could head down I-5. We stayed at the Mother-in-laws, and woke up to another unforecasted snow. We were able to make it out of their neighborhood and were actually the only vehicle that left the in laws house. They only had 2WDs: a truck and a Camry.

They lost power and so we went by the store in the truck/camper to get some things they needed. So, we stayed another night and got propane even though there was 8-10 inches of snow.

Power came back on, so we went to the next relatives house. That night … you guessed it, snow again. Her uncled stayed home in his 2WD truck because he didn’t think it was worth chaining up to get back up his driveway.

We continued on to Salem, OR to visit my brother. The passes were still nasty so we were giving them time to clear. By the time we got to Salem, the roads were clear.

After a couple of days, we headed back from Oregon. Along the way back from Oregon, we hit unforecasted snow/ice in the Gorge and then up by Kennewick. DW drove after I dislocated my collarbone for the days we were gone. She is more than capable, but I wouldn’t have wished chains on her and that would have added about a day to our trip home since you can drive very fast with chains.

When I got back to Montana, I couldn’t even get up my driveway with 4x4 and good tires. The snow was too deep. So, I walked the 1/3 mile up to my upper shed and got the Ranger UTV that already had the plow on it. Good thing, because I dislocated my collarbone while in Washington. After plowing for a couple of hours to get rid of the foot or snow and the drifts that were even higher, I was able to get the truck with camper up the driveway. No, I didn’t try to install my chains.

Maybe a 2WD could make this trip, but I had DW put the truck in 4x4 several times and we drove at least 100 miles in 4x4. We could just stay home in Winter. [emoticon]


'10 Ford F-450, 6.4, 4.30, 4x4, 14,500 GVWR, '06 Host Rainer 950 Dbl Slide, Torklift Talon tiedowns, Glow Steps, and Fastguns. Bilstein 4600s, Firestone Air Bags, Hankook DH-01 225/19.5 Fs, Curt front hitch, Energy Suspension bump stops.


jimh425

Western MT

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Posted: 11/01/19 08:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

specta wrote:

14% is nothing. I've been up steeper driveways than that.


My road up to my trailers is steeper than that. I agree, but there isn’t a video of him going up either. Could have just parked at the top, walked down and took the picture. [emoticon]

That’s what I did in this case at Fort Stevens. No, I didn’t drive the extremely soft sand on the beach.

[image]

burningman

Seattle, WA USA

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Posted: 11/02/19 05:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:


Frankly when somebody writes that 4x4 doesn't cost in thousands over the life of the truck, I think he must be idiot or liar.
Anybody can come with different explanation?


I probably can’t come up with an explanation you would understand...

My experience owning many two and four wheel drive trucks doesn’t bear that out.
I had a 2WD crewcab dually and parked on a steep hill with a camper and heavy trailer.
Tried to back up, but couldn’t.
The 4WD I replaced it with, same otherwise, did it easily because it had low range.
I could rattle off other incidents half the day.
Just recently I was coming up the trail out of my friend’s camping property on wet leaves and lost traction. Not goin’ nowhere, even with the camper weight and limited slip diff.
A simple shift to 4WD and problem gone, truck not stuck.

These examples are with the camper on.
Even if it did cost thousands extra over the life of the truck - which it doesn’t - it would be worth it.
And I’d get it all back in resale value.


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jaycocreek

Idaho

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Posted: 11/02/19 05:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

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In the state that I live in the "big thousands dollars" that will cost you is when you try and sell a 2wd pickup. You wont get squat for it.


I sure do not understand that..Marysville Utah gets about 1/2 the national average of snow a year that others do..We get double that and my old 2WD ford F-250 sold for what I payed for it on the first looker..Ours is a community of Loggers and Ranchers that use there pickups hard.

McCall Idaho where I spent over 40 years living and working out of,gets 5-6X the snowfall you get there and 1/2 the town drives 2WD's..A good pickup in 2WD or 4WD sells easily if the price is reasonable..

I guess that is one of the big differences in Utah and Idaho..Just one.LOL


1994 F-350 DRW /460/k&n intake /415# torque/lance 9.6/Engel compressor fridge/3 gr 27 batteries/Honda 2k/Honda 3K/WH Camo 2250/Reese solid bar extension/Buddy heater/3 inverters//Happi Jack tie downs /Firestone bags/Yamaha Rhino/Winch and Lockers

jaycocreek

Idaho

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Posted: 11/02/19 06:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

I probably can’t come up with an explanation you would understand...


Sure you could..The problem here is where we live and what we use our truck campers for..I am sure where you live by Seattle 4WD is needed at times..My daughter moved to Everett Washington from McCall Idaho and laughed at how people drove over there when they got those rare snow storms..Actually,it scared her the way they drove with little experience in the snow..

I know your not that way by your post and occupations...People with 4X4's will defend the 'til death,I used to be that way in my younger years..Also,I could name a few times 4X4 with a TC could be better than 2WD..But and a big butttt,years and years of driving in the snow with a truck camper has shown me that I rarely needed 4X4 unless I went looking for trouble taking it where I should not have..Didn't care back then..Break an axle.. fix it/dent up the camper..fix it..Those days are over..

I know where I can take my 2WD with my TC now and why I have to much truck for my currant TC..I do alot of off camber(if you will) traveling on backcountry roads..My TC is 10ft at the ladder rack and 93" wide taking me where larger wider truck campers cannot go and my 2WD DRW get's me places my old F-250 2WD would not get...

The whole point is,it works for me and I did not have to spend way way more for the same used DRW in 4WD..People with 4X4's,and I still am(Just not for a TC),sometimes think there used 4X4 are made of gold.I have a Dodge Dakota 4X4 with awesome tires that goes where know has ever gone..(laffin) and a Nissan 4X4 that is my beater truck and wood getter..I cruise the hills in that not worrying about dents and dingsand go where I want and get stuck where I want.[emoticon][emoticon]

I enjoy 4X4ing alot and I spend alot of time in the mountains and have my entire life and once you put a big heavy truck camper on your 4X4,you are very limited to where you can go and the only advantage is 4 low and an occasional trip on snowy roads that studs could do almost as well and chains even better...

I guess this thread has run it's course because it is only a couple that would never agree with the others that a new person to truck camping does not need to have 4X4 to haul there TC..

I do not have a scanner but I will try and find some of my old pictures of my 4X4's carrying a TC in the mountains and take a picture with my trudty Pixel 2XL with the Pixel 4 camera(laughing)

jimh425

Western MT

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Posted: 11/02/19 06:24am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jaycocreek wrote:

I guess this thread has run it's course because it is only a couple that would never agree with the others that a new person to truck camping does not need to have 4X4 to haul there TC.


A new person doesn’t even need a TC. They could get along fine with a tent and only camp in warm dry weather near facilities.

Yeah, maybe run it’s course because you said this thread was about why each of us needs 4x4. Even after all of our examples, you two insist you could have done what we have done with your 2WDs.

For those who don’t know, McCall is pretty flat and has cold dry snow, and generally really cold when it snows.. Not anywhere close to the type of snow or terrain of downtown Seattle not to mention that Seattle doesn’t have much snow equipment, people can’t even drive in perfect weather, and Seattle has more than one intersection.

There’s also no reason to drive around McCall in Winter because there is nowhere to go, and for the real snowy weather, you’d never drive a conventional vehicle and more likely just use a ATV/UTV/Snowmobile. Having a 2WD that you never use is probably fine. [emoticon]

jaycocreek

Idaho

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Posted: 11/02/19 07:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

For those who don’t know, McCall is pretty flat and has cold dry snow, and generally really cold when it snows.. Not anywhere close to the type of snow or terrain of downtown Seattle not to mention that Seattle doesn’t have much snow equipment, people can’t even drive in perfect weather, and Seattle has more than one intersection.

There’s also no reason to drive around McCall in Winter because there is nowhere to go, and for the real snowy weather, you’d never drive a conventional vehicle and more likely just use a ATV/UTV/Snowmobile. Having a 2WD that you never use is probably fine


Luaghing..You did a drive by huh...

This is Mccall when I moved there, at 5,000 feet right in the middle of Idaho's mountains..Going for groceries is sometimes a chore at -35F and 5 feet of snow..My diesel wouldn't run and the 4X4 was frozen..Took the wifes '67 Ford F-250 straight 6 2WD to town that day..LOL

[image]
..

srschang

Western NY

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Posted: 11/02/19 07:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Frankly when somebody writes that 4x4 doesn't cost in thousands over the life of the truck, I think he must be idiot or liar.
Anybody can come with different explanation?

Just entered my truck, 2015 Ram 3500 4x4 diesel into a couple different used car price websites - KBB, Edmunds, NADA. Looks like it will be worth ~$3000 more when I trade it in vs the exact same truck in 2wd.

The 4x4 option cost me $2465 when I ordered the truck new. Huh.

Scott

* This post was edited 11/02/19 07:58am by srschang *


2020 Ram 3500 SRW Crewcab Longbed Cummins, 2019 Northstar 12 STC

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