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 > Yes boys and girls, you REALLY need to carry a spare...

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toedtoes

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Posted: 11/13/19 07:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It does not count as a claim, however it is kept in their system.

Years ago a section of fence came down. I called the insurance company and due to it being just 4 ft of fence, it was not worth claiming. The rep informed me that if I filed a claim later for the fence, they would deny it - because I had informed them that the fence was damaged.

It won't happen every time, but it does happen.


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jjrbus

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Posted: 11/13/19 08:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am surprised the insurance coughed up with a few bucks, until I read this I would have just ate the cost assuming the insurance would not pay.

Because people do things differently does not always mean either one of them is wrong.

greyhook

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Posted: 11/14/19 05:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When taking a long trip in any vehicle, it's a good idea to be prepared. The old saying, "Ya never know", comes to mind.
This past summer, we embarked on a 5000+ mile trip that took us to Texas to Key West. On the way home, our Greyhawk developed a shimmy after a short patch of rough road. Shortly thereafter, I discovered a flat left-side inner drive tire, not a blowout, just flat. From what I could tell, I was a valve-stem. At least the tire would still be salvageable. Fortunately, I had brought everything I needed to change it myself. We do have AAA but I didn't see the point in waiting when I could do it myself. Less than an hour later, we were back on the road.
The next day, over more rough road, I felt the RV shimmy again. Pulled into a rest area and found that the spare, which I had mounted on the outside, had spun a belt. A quick consultation with google told me there was a tire shop 8 miles up the road. I parked in the lot of the tire shop plaza and took the tire with the bad valve stem in to be repaired. The shop had it done in short order and we were once again on our way.
It could have been a lot worse. Our good luck had us in nice dry weather on flat ground. The inconvenience to our trip was negligible. The peace of mind that comes from being prepared, though, is priceless.

ron.dittmer

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Posted: 11/14/19 10:53am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

ron.dittmer wrote:

It has been our experience that any insurance claim regardless how minor, and "yes" even simple inquiries to determine if we should file a claim to our insurance company, auto or home policy, the rates jump up so badly that we have to switch insurance companies.

Once we learned how the insurance system actually works, we get the highest deductible plans, and pay out of pocket without informing our insurance, even when exceeding the deductible by "reasonable" amounts. We save BIG money over-all this way.

And if you wonder, we had so few claims over our 42 year driving and home ownership history. All claims were very minor incidents that we felt did not warrant such high increases in our policies. The few claims we had were smaller than the cost of coverage for that given year.
Ron, Insurance companies can NOT raise your rates for simply making an inquiry regarding a potential claim.
I wish someone would have told that to Allstate.

I had them since I bought my first car in 1978. Back in 2008 I had a 2000 Toyota MR2 Spyder that someone in a store parking lot backed into the rear quarter panel and messed it up a bit. This happened while I was in the store shopping, so I had nobody to blame for the damage. They just drove off without leaving a note. I called Allstate and after talking with them, and then getting an estimate from a local auto body shop, I said I would pay the repair myself because it was so little above my deductible. That call ended up on-record and my rate jumped yet again. I called Allstate after the painful rate hike and they said it was because of the damage to the MR2. I explained the chain of events and reminded them that I took care of it myself. That meant nothing to them. They just "stiffed" me.

A few years later, after talking with family and friends, we switched to AARP Hartford and have been with them since. So far so good......crossing my fingers.

* This post was edited 11/14/19 11:06am by ron.dittmer *


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pnichols

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Posted: 11/14/19 11:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

greyhook wrote:

When taking a long trip in any vehicle, it's a good idea to be prepared. The old saying, "Ya never know", comes to mind.
This past summer, we embarked on a 5000+ mile trip that took us to Texas to Key West. On the way home, our Greyhawk developed a shimmy after a short patch of rough road. Shortly thereafter, I discovered a flat left-side inner drive tire, not a blowout, just flat. From what I could tell, I was a valve-stem. At least the tire would still be salvageable. Fortunately, I had brought everything I needed to change it myself. We do have AAA but I didn't see the point in waiting when I could do it myself. Less than an hour later, we were back on the road.
The next day, over more rough road, I felt the RV shimmy again. Pulled into a rest area and found that the spare, which I had mounted on the outside, had spun a belt. A quick consultation with google told me there was a tire shop 8 miles up the road. I parked in the lot of the tire shop plaza and took the tire with the bad valve stem in to be repaired. The shop had it done in short order and we were once again on our way.
It could have been a lot worse. Our good luck had us in nice dry weather on flat ground. The inconvenience to our trip was negligible. The peace of mind that comes from being prepared, though, is priceless.


If I understand your second situation ... you drove about 8 miles with only one tire supporting all of the weight on the one rear corner of the one dually set with the bad tire in it?

If so, that in itself is a tricky/dangerous situation and at the very least seriously over-stresses the one good tire and could permanently compromise it internally. We did that for 5 miles once due to a flat tire in one of the rear dual sets and it was "scary". Driving that way made the rear of our small Class C feel very unstable and "squishy".


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

greyhook

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Posted: 11/15/19 05:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

greyhook wrote:

When taking a long trip in any vehicle, it's a good idea to be prepared. The old saying, "Ya never know", comes to mind.
This past summer, we embarked on a 5000+ mile trip that took us to Texas to Key West. On the way home, our Greyhawk developed a shimmy after a short patch of rough road. Shortly thereafter, I discovered a flat left-side inner drive tire, not a blowout, just flat. From what I could tell, I was a valve-stem. At least the tire would still be salvageable. Fortunately, I had brought everything I needed to change it myself. We do have AAA but I didn't see the point in waiting when I could do it myself. Less than an hour later, we were back on the road.
The next day, over more rough road, I felt the RV shimmy again. Pulled into a rest area and found that the spare, which I had mounted on the outside, had spun a belt. A quick consultation with google told me there was a tire shop 8 miles up the road. I parked in the lot of the tire shop plaza and took the tire with the bad valve stem in to be repaired. The shop had it done in short order and we were once again on our way.
It could have been a lot worse. Our good luck had us in nice dry weather on flat ground. The inconvenience to our trip was negligible. The peace of mind that comes from being prepared, though, is priceless.


If I understand your second situation ... you drove about 8 miles with only one tire supporting all of the weight on the one rear corner of the one dually set with the bad tire in it?

If so, that in itself is a tricky/dangerous situation and at the very least seriously over-stresses the one good tire and could permanently compromise it internally. We did that for 5 miles once due to a flat tire in one of the rear dual sets and it was "scary". Driving that way made the rear of our small Class C feel very unstable and "squishy".

The tire with the spun belt was still inflated. I felt 8 miles wasn't a big stretch and, although I agree it was a little stressful, thankfully, it turned out fine.

4x4van

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Posted: 11/15/19 02:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Personally, I'll never be dependent on ERS, when I can change a tire myself IF necessary. Spotty cell coverage, long wait times, high replacement tire prices... Sorry, not for me.

As an example of just the "time" issue; a few years ago, had an electrical issue with a Chevy Suburban, about 2pm. Called AAA for a tow. While we had good cell coverage, we were in Blythe, CA, and there was only limited tow companies available; and AAA wouldn't go off the pavement. Had a local "non-AAA" towtruck get us from where we were located (on the beach along the Colorado River about 150' from the pavement) to a parking lot in town (about 5 miles). Then we waited for AAA. And waited. And waited some more (Keep in mind that it was Sunday afternoon, after a day on the river, tired, ready to head home, AND it was still 115 degrees in the shade!!). AAA's only contracted truck in the area was coming back from a run into Encino (near Los Angeles). After more than 6 hours, he finally showed up, and then his winch caught fire while trying to pull the Suburban onto the flatbed. Waited some more for his shop to come out and fix the winch. Finally got it loaded and hit the road at 10pm, to begin a the trip home to SoCal, arriving home at 2:30am.

No, this has nothing to do with a flat tire. But it DOES have everything to do with time. There is nothing in ANY ERS documentation that guarantees a "timely" response. Did AAA respond? Yes. Did they get my vehicle home? Yes. Would I consider it a successful "transaction"? No, and I'll never rely on them again unless there is NO OTHER CHOICE, PERIOD.

Of course, YMMV.


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jjrbus

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Posted: 11/16/19 04:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

4x4van wrote:

Personally, I'll never be dependent on ERS, when I can change a tire myself IF necessary. Spotty cell coverage, long wait times, high replacement tire prices... Sorry, not for me.

As an example of just the "time" issue; a few years ago, had an electrical issue with a Chevy Suburban, about 2pm. Called AAA for a tow. While we had good cell coverage, we were in Blythe, CA, and there was only limited tow companies available; and AAA wouldn't go off the pavement. Had a local "non-AAA" towtruck get us from where we were located (on the beach along the Colorado River about 150' from the pavement) to a parking lot in town (about 5 miles). Then we waited for AAA. And waited. And waited some more (Keep in mind that it was Sunday afternoon, after a day on the river, tired, ready to head home, AND it was still 115 degrees in the shade!!). AAA's only contracted truck in the area was coming back from a run into Encino (near Los Angeles). After more than 6 hours, he finally showed up, and then his winch caught fire while trying to pull the Suburban onto the flatbed. Waited some more for his shop to come out and fix the winch. Finally got it loaded and hit the road at 10pm, to begin a the trip home to SoCal, arriving home at 2:30am.

No, this has nothing to do with a flat tire. But it DOES have everything to do with time. There is nothing in ANY ERS documentation that guarantees a "timely" response. Did AAA respond? Yes. Did they get my vehicle home? Yes. Would I consider it a successful "transaction"? No, and I'll never rely on them again unless there is NO OTHER CHOICE, PERIOD.

Of course, YMMV.


While your experience was pretty bad, it is far from the worse I have heard. Add, and then the tow company totaled our RV to get up into the top 10 worst stories.

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 11/16/19 02:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

This pic does not show it but the the tire split right down to the rim and scattered tread for about 50 yards:

[image]

[image]

Left last Tuesday for a week on the Colorado River at Ehrenburg. On Monday {as is my habit before every trip} I took the Class C into Discount Tire to have the tires checked and aired up to my specs - 65 on the front and 75 on the rears}. "You are good to go, tires look fine and are aired up as per your request." We were towing our Polaris Rzr in the 10' cargo trailer and running pretty close to our GVWR of 11,500#.

We were 107 miles west of the River when my left rear {outside} Michelin grenades. Now the shoulder of Interstate 10 west of phoenix is no place e you want to spend any time but spend time we did. I got us completely off of the pavement and called Coach Net {for the first time in 10+ years}. They got a guy out to us in about an hour. In the mean time I placed three emergency triangles at 25, 50 and 75 yards behind our rig and my bride and I got as far away from the coach well back from the shoulder and waited.

The guy from the towing company was driving a half ton pick up but had all of the requisite tools. Said he would have us gone in ten minutes... 45 minutes later we were on our way. When the tread separated it ripped the mudflap nearly off and wedged it between the two tires and bent the mudflow steel support frame. I thanked him profusely and tipped him a twenty.

Yesterday I called the nearest Discount Tire store {In Yuma} and made an appointment for 1030 this morning. The tire that exploded had a DOT Code of 50/13 making it about 5.5 years old... yep, my bad, should have replaced it sooner even though it looked great. Found two others that also looked fine {same DOT Codes} and replaced all three and my spare returned to its mount under the rear of the coach {Thank you Nexus for the outstanding custom mount they installed 4.5 years ago.

Bottom line... without a spare ready to deploy we would have been up the proverbial creek and would have spent considerably more time in "The Dead Zone - aptly named, on the shoulder of one of the busiest interstates in the country.

Without a spare they would have had to dispatch a full on tow truck equipped to install a new tire on the old rim and I shudder to think what that tire would have cost {assuming they had one available}.

I carry all of the tools needed to change a tire but I will be 68 next month and really had no desire {and not much ability} to crawl under the rig and make it happen.

For the record 3 new tires, installed and I was out the door {in an hour} for a little over $700. Discount has the highest prices of any major chain but their customer service is excellent and they are almost everywhere. I was in no position to shop the tires so bottom line... problem solved and I drove home once again a happy camper.

Seriously folks... get yourself a spare!
[emoticon]


This is off topic, but slightly related ... how about ERS for our bodies? This is probably higher priority than help if our RVs ever are "in trouble".

We carry a satellite device along with us in the RV and the necessary insurance for it - such that by pushing an SOS button on it - you can get medivac service from your GPS location in case your body or someone elses along with you is ever in dire need. In addition to the device's medivac insurance policy - for additional insurance just in case - I've also added Good Sam's Premier TravelAssist insurance program:
https://www.goodsamtravelassist.com/findaplan/

We hope we never need any of the above - but you know how it goes ... "Plan for the worst, and hope for the best."

Desert Captain

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Posted: 11/16/19 07:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Good points Phil...

We all hope to never need help but all too often an injury, even a minor one can spell disaster. I carry a serious first aid kit and have been trained in its use {the same medical kit I carried when doing extended offshore boating trips modified slightly for the RV environment}. From a suture kit to serious pain meds, I am prepared to deal with burns, fractures and bleeding.

Often we are either beyond cell phone coverage or at its outer limits where help can be hours {or more} away. I also have the GS emergency travel assist but admit to some trepidation as to how effective it will ultimately be. Since we often are riding our motorcycle the possibility of even a minor accident could render us less than able to get ourselves and the rig home.


Yep, plan for the worst and hope for the best, once a Boy Scout always a Boy Scout...
Be Prepared!

[emoticon]





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