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Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Overloaded wheel Breakage

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wnjj

Cornelius, Oregon

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Posted: 11/01/19 12:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What I find pathetic is the wheels were supposedly rated for 2500 lbs but failed with not much over 3000. That is a terrible margin for such a critical component. That wheel was either defective or the company that made it is.

joebedford

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Posted: 11/01/19 04:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Muh wheel scot pleny of life lef

[image]

specta

utah

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Posted: 11/01/19 05:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wnjj wrote:

What I find pathetic is the wheels were supposedly rated for 2500 lbs but failed with not much over 3000. That is a terrible margin for such a critical component. That wheel was either defective or the company that made it is.


20% is quite a bit.


Kenny
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Posted: 11/01/19 06:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Alcoa wheels are expensive and have a high rating by comparison. They need sticky weights inside the wheel because the regular weights will cause a white rash to form on the coating with the outer edge hammer on weights. You also need to scrape the mating surfaces anytime you have the wheels off because there is always a bit of scale from the corrosion being that its against a steel hub all the time. This so you can torque them to at least 120 ft lbs. Mine are not hub centric just well torqued with a good torque wrench. been hauling the camper with them for 16 yrs this October. They are the highest rated 16 inch rim you can find.

I don't want 19.5's because I think they are too hard on the running gear with 3.55 gears. Maybe alright with 4.10 running gears

Boondocking2019

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Posted: 11/01/19 09:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In my search for upgrading Tires and Wheels for my F350 SRW several large tire / wheel dealers suggested the Method 305 NV Heavy Duty Wheels. I just installed these wheels and they’re listed as having the highest load rating for 18” Wheels that I can find. On the backside of the wheel it’s stamped (6 Lug 3500 lb rating) and (8 Lug 4500 lb rating). So clearly this manufacturer is labeling the weight rating for Lug Nut Application. How many wheel manufacturers stamp the Lug nut weight capacity by Lug application?
This thread has opinions on after market versus OEM wheels and my Super Duty F350 SRW is not a grocery getter it was purchased to haul a 12000 lb 5th Wheel or my new 89RBS Adventurer Camper. The F350 OEM Wheels at 3650 # rating would cover my 7000# Door Sticker for the rear axle weight, but the Campers loaded Wet weight is a little over and this prompted upgrading to the 4080# 295/70R/18 Cooper Tires and the wider 18x9 Method Wheel at 4500# Rating. Attention to monitoring Tire Pressures often and checking Wheel Torque especially the rear axle has been a Standard Operating Procedure for many years of RVing.

burningman

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Posted: 11/01/19 10:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Siletzspey wrote:

FYI/question - on a 1-ton, the tire, wheel, axle, spring and frame ratings tend to be max'ed out equally, so upgrading just one component doesn't necessarily buy you much. I read what seemed like a fairly competent posting elsewhere that the lug bolts (pattern, count, size) are another weight-rated link-in-the-chain to consider. While the tires always win the weakest-link award, I wonder where lug bolts fall in the line-up?


Axles are in fact very under-rated by the truck makers.
If you check with the axle makers, you’ll find that 3/4 and 1-ton rear axles are rated a whole lot higher than the truck makers claim.

Upgrading wheels and tires gets you real benefits.


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DWeikert

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Posted: 11/02/19 09:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jimh425 wrote:

I think the lug bolts don’t carry much if the wheels are hub centric. However, I have heard of bolts breaking if the wheels get loose.


Hub or lug centric is irrelevant regarding load. The load is carried by the friction between the wheel and mating surface. This friction is created by the clamping force of the lugs which is why proper torque on our lug nuts is important. This is also the reason you don't want any grease or oil on those mating surfaces.

"Centric" refers to how a wheel is centered while mounting. Hub centric wheels are good for manufacturing because the wheel can be mounted on the vehicle then the lug nuts just torqued down. With a lug centered wheel more care must be taken while installing and tightening the lugs.


Dan
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jimh425

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Posted: 11/02/19 09:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DWeikert wrote:

Hub or lug centric is irrelevant regarding load. The load is carried by the friction between the wheel and mating surface.


Read more below.

https://www.quadratec.com/c/blog/differe........tween-hub-centric-and-lug-centric-wheels

Basically, hub centric means the space inside the wheel’s center bore is designed to fit perfectly on the axle. This way, the wheel is centered by the hub connection and the lugs can hold it flush against the mounting plate. In a hub-centric design, this connection will bear the weight of the Jeep.

https://www.machinedesign.com/fasteners........tween-lug-centric-and-hub-centric-wheels

A problem arises when using a lug-centric wheel on a vehicle and suspension that was originally a hub-centric design. Without the hub’s support, road impacts can deform lugs enough to where the wheel is no longer concentric with the hub, leading to vibrations. This can reduce the clamping force of the wheel to the hub. Road loading conditions can then move the wheel around on the hub, as can be seen by the worn holes in the image below of a lug-centric wheel used on a hub-centric vehicle.


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ticki2

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Posted: 11/04/19 05:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hub centric wheels are more for convenience than load bearing , it helps center the wheel before final torqing the lug nuts . If it were for weight bearing it would have to be machined to much tighter tolerance and pressed fit .Almost all oem wheels now are hub centric for this reason , even on small cars . With lug centric wheels more care has to be taken to gradually tighten the cone lug nuts to insure they are all centered in the holes before final torque . Almost no aftermarket wheels are hub centric , including 19.5" , yet some have higher load ratings than oem wheels . 1ton and above dual wheel lug nuts have washers instead of cone shape to exert even more clamping force . It is also way they should be hub centric or have centering rings .


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jimh425

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Posted: 11/04/19 06:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ticki2 wrote:

Hub centric wheels are more for convenience than load bearing


Other than your thoughts which might be right, btw. Do you have any references other than wheel manufacturers? I can find a lot of references that say that they are load bearing which is not to say the bear all of the load all of the time. See the post above yours for two.

Here’s the credentials from the writer of the bottom one

Charles C. Roberts, Jr., Ph.D., P.E., is an engineering consultant in the areas of accident reconstruction, failure analysis, structural analysis, heat transfer, fire origin analysis, computer analysis, mechanics, and biomechanics.

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