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 > Storage in Barn for winter.

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Lynnmor

Red Lion

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Posted: 11/04/19 01:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a pole barn with a concrete floor. I do have staining from the preservative chemicals leaching out of the tires. It might be a good idea to always put down a barrier for long term storage. With the new concrete, using a board would spread the load.

I leave the battery in the trailer and disconnect the power cord so that it is not exposed to any power issues. The battery is turned off at the disconnect switch and I connect a Battery Tender about 3 to 4 days per month. A cord is wired to the battery to provide a quick and easy connection.





ksbowman

Kansas

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Posted: 11/04/19 07:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We keep ours in a pole barn with a gravel floor. I always park it on wood. Being the first year I would have wood under the tires and landing gear for the tires and the new concrete. I'd consider with the new concrete raising with the jacks and maybe lifting the tires off the concrete with hydraulic jacks.

Road Dog

Waukesha,WI

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Posted: 11/04/19 08:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I leave my motorhome plugged into a timer that goes on 4 hrs every day Been doing this for years with no problems! Same with the battery tender for the engine battery.

pasusan

Northernmost PA

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Posted: 11/05/19 04:30am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A couple of years ago we built a new garage for our RV. To protect the concrete and tires we bought some vinyl runner and cut it into rectangles to go under the tires. It works for us.

We also have a Progressive Dynamics converter and leave it plugged in 24/7.


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magicbus

Nantucket Island, MA

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Posted: 11/05/19 06:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

My cars managed to live on concrete for many years without the tires hurting the concrete or the concrete hurting the tires. My B lives in our barn on concrete and I just don't worry about it.

Dave


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Deb and Ed M

SW MI & Space Coast, FL USA

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Posted: 11/05/19 06:54am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

With fresh concrete, *I* would put down some wood.

You will be amazed at how nice your RV remains when parked indoors! When we sold our 10-yr-old Class C - it looked like new :-)

midnightsadie

ohio

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Posted: 11/05/19 08:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

put pads under it or some ply wood ,that cement is still soft. BUT YOUR missing this .. peppermint oil and alot of it and a product called fresh cab. to keep the critters out. mines in a pole bldg I use the oil in pill bottles about six drops in each and about a dozen of them. the fresh cab I take out of the pack and tie up tea bag size using panty hose .. never a critter my rv is 12years old.

WTP-GC

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Posted: 11/07/19 04:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In temps above freezing, your concrete will reach full design strength in 14-21 days (approximately). But what is that? Did you pour 3000 PSI or 4000 PSI or...? Within 7 days, it will reach 50-75% design strength. So let’s say 1500 PSI (pounds per square inch). Your rig weighs...? Your tires take up how many square inches of space? If you had 1 tire only and it took up 24 square inches, the concrete below it could withstand 36,000 pounds of static pressure (@ 1500 PSI).

No wood. It’s a barn, who cares about staining. We leave ours plugged in 24/7/365 and the fridge stays on the whole time. Done this with 3 campers...NO problem.


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Lynnmor

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Posted: 11/07/19 06:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

WTP-GC wrote:

In temps above freezing, your concrete will reach full design strength in 14-21 days (approximately). But what is that? Did you pour 3000 PSI or 4000 PSI or...? Within 7 days, it will reach 50-75% design strength. So let’s say 1500 PSI (pounds per square inch). Your rig weighs...? Your tires take up how many square inches of space? If you had 1 tire only and it took up 24 square inches, the concrete below it could withstand 36,000 pounds of static pressure (@ 1500 PSI).

No wood. It’s a barn, who cares about staining. We leave ours plugged in 24/7/365 and the fridge stays on the whole time. Done this with 3 campers...NO problem.


That's not how it works when considering the strength that will not crack.

Some do care about appearance and the guy with a new floor just might be able to head off staining that cannot be reversed.

WTP-GC

FL

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Posted: 11/07/19 06:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lynnmor wrote:

WTP-GC wrote:

In temps above freezing, your concrete will reach full design strength in 14-21 days (approximately). But what is that? Did you pour 3000 PSI or 4000 PSI or...? Within 7 days, it will reach 50-75% design strength. So let’s say 1500 PSI (pounds per square inch). Your rig weighs...? Your tires take up how many square inches of space? If you had 1 tire only and it took up 24 square inches, the concrete below it could withstand 36,000 pounds of static pressure (@ 1500 PSI).

No wood. It’s a barn, who cares about staining. We leave ours plugged in 24/7/365 and the fridge stays on the whole time. Done this with 3 campers...NO problem.


That's not how it works when considering the strength that will not crack.

Some do care about appearance and the guy with a new floor just might be able to head off staining that cannot be reversed.

Well, actually it kinda is. We regularly begin erection of large heavy objects on new concrete that are no more than 7 days cured. If weather and conditions are accommodating, we may even begin in 3 days. Nary a problem.

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