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 > New Ford 7.3 V8

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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Joined: 05/06/2013

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Posted: 11/12/19 02:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

colliehauler wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

^Yeah GM is still sucking wind in the gas HD truck engines, even with the new 6.6. Maybe they'll be under rated, hopefully.
As to old engines, what about 351M Ford big blocks, 360 GM truck motors and old 360 Chrysler big blocks.
LS7 is a really big small block too.....
Ford had two 351 engines a Windsor and a Cleveland one a small block the other a big block. Wasn't the original GM big block a 348 porcupine?


I thought both the W and C engines were small blocks and the M was a big block, but I don't know Fords very well. I do know parts aren't interchangeable worth a cr@p between an old 302 and a 351 though.
Ha, didn't know the 348 was the predecessor to the 409. Makes sense as the 348 was the big engine before the 409.
Learn something new every day!


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

danrclem

Ky.

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Posted: 11/12/19 04:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

colliehauler wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

^Yeah GM is still sucking wind in the gas HD truck engines, even with the new 6.6. Maybe they'll be under rated, hopefully.
As to old engines, what about 351M Ford big blocks, 360 GM truck motors and old 360 Chrysler big blocks.
LS7 is a really big small block too.....
Ford had two 351 engines a Windsor and a Cleveland one a small block the other a big block. Wasn't the original GM big block a 348 porcupine?


I thought both the W and C engines were small blocks and the M was a big block, but I don't know Fords very well. I do know parts aren't interchangeable worth a cr@p between an old 302 and a 351 though.
Ha, didn't know the 348 was the predecessor to the 409. Makes sense as the 348 was the big engine before the 409.
Learn something new every day!


The 351 Windsor is basically the same block as a 302 with a taller deck. The 351 heads will fit on the 221, 260, 289 and 302 but the compression will be low unless you make other changes. The intake and rotating assembly won't interchange without modifications. The 351 Cleveland is a 335 series engine and it's physically larger than the 351 Windsor. Don't know if it would be considered a big block or not but I doubt it. The 385 series (429, 460) was considered a big block. The Boss 302 was a hybrid. It had the Windsor style block with Cleveland heads. There were some modifications made to make it work.

The original Ford (FE-Ford Edsel) big block started out with a 332 and I think the 352 may have been made the first year too but not sure. They also made a 360, 390, 406, 410, 427 and 428 FE engines. I think there were also some different displacement engines made just for bigger trucks.

They had another big block engine that was only put into Mercury, Edsels and Lincolns called the MEL. MEL stood for Mercury, Edsel and Lincoln. Not sure about all of the displacements of them but one was a 383.

colliehauler

Mc Pherson KS USA

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Joined: 01/27/2004

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Posted: 11/12/19 05:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

danrclem wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

colliehauler wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

^Yeah GM is still sucking wind in the gas HD truck engines, even with the new 6.6. Maybe they'll be under rated, hopefully.
As to old engines, what about 351M Ford big blocks, 360 GM truck motors and old 360 Chrysler big blocks.
LS7 is a really big small block too.....
Ford had two 351 engines a Windsor and a Cleveland one a small block the other a big block. Wasn't the original GM big block a 348 porcupine?


I thought both the W and C engines were small blocks and the M was a big block, but I don't know Fords very well. I do know parts aren't interchangeable worth a cr@p between an old 302 and a 351 though.
Ha, didn't know the 348 was the predecessor to the 409. Makes sense as the 348 was the big engine before the 409.
Learn something new every day!


The 351 Windsor is basically the same block as a 302 with a taller deck. The 351 heads will fit on the 221, 260, 289 and 302 but the compression will be low unless you make other changes. The intake and rotating assembly won't interchange without modifications. The 351 Cleveland is a 335 series engine and it's physically larger than the 351 Windsor. Don't know if it would be considered a big block or not but I doubt it. The 385 series (429, 460) was considered a big block. The Boss 302 was a hybrid. It had the Windsor style block with Cleveland heads. There were some modifications made to make it work.

The original Ford (FE-Ford Edsel) big block started out with a 332 and I think the 352 may have been made the first year too but not sure. They also made a 360, 390, 406, 410, 427 and 428 FE engines. I think there were also some different displacement engines made just for bigger trucks.

They had another big block engine that was only put into Mercury, Edsels and Lincolns called the MEL. MEL stood for Mercury, Edsel and Lincoln. Not sure about all of the displacements of them but one was a 383.
I don't know if the Cleveland was actually considered a big block but it was physically larger then the Windsor so we always referred to it as a big block.

I remember GM had a V-6 made out of a big block motor in the GMC trucks mid sixties vintage, don't remember the displacement.

I also remember mid seventies when Dodge put a non turbo Diesel Mitsubishi in a pickup long before the Cummins.

Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Joined: 04/08/2002

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Posted: 11/12/19 07:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I miss the old days. They were IMO, what hot rodding was all about. The Chevy SB had so many possible configurations that one could swap things aroung and build a motor such as the 383... A motor that chevy never produced.

Those were the days when Hot rodders actually got into the inner workings of motors, porting heads, lapping valves, fitting piston rings. installing cams.... Nowadays most just tap on a keyboard and "tune" a motor... The Tuners never get any grease/oil on their hands. Hard to see that as mechanicing... More like playing a video game.



Huntindog
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ShinerBock

SATX

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Joined: 02/22/2015

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Posted: 11/12/19 07:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Huntindog wrote:



Those were the days when Hot rodders actually got into the inner workings of motors, porting heads, lapping valves, fitting piston rings. installing cams.... Nowadays most just tap on a keyboard and "tune" a motor... The Tuners never get any grease/oil on their hands. Hard to see that as mechanicing... More like playing a video game.



Tuners never get grease on their hands? Really? Guess all that stuff I got on my hands when I replaced my turbo/manifold for performance turbo and manifold, removed my EGR/DPF/SCR, installed turbo back exhaust, installed head studs, and so on was not actually grease?

Tuning doesn't create horsepower. Hard parts still do. Tuning only unleashes it.

blofgren

Surrey, B.C.

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Joined: 11/26/2005

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Posted: 11/12/19 08:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

^Yeah GM is still sucking wind in the gas HD truck engines, even with the new 6.6. Maybe they'll be under rated, hopefully.
As to old engines, what about 351M Ford big blocks, 360 GM truck motors and old 360 Chrysler big blocks.
LS7 is a really big small block too.....


Pretty tough to beat the reliability of the GM LS engines, though......I'm pretty impressed with how smooth the 5.3L is in my old 2001 Yukon. [emoticon]


2013 Ram 3500 Megacab DRW Laramie 4x4, 6.7L Cummins, G56, 3.73, Maximum Steel, black lthr, RAM 20k sliding hitch, Retrax, Linex, and a bunch of options incl. cargo camera
2008 Corsair Excella Platinum 34.5 CKTS fifth wheel with winter package & disc brakes

mich800

Pontiac, MI

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Joined: 05/30/2004

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Posted: 11/12/19 08:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ShinerBock wrote:

Huntindog wrote:



Those were the days when Hot rodders actually got into the inner workings of motors, porting heads, lapping valves, fitting piston rings. installing cams.... Nowadays most just tap on a keyboard and "tune" a motor... The Tuners never get any grease/oil on their hands. Hard to see that as mechanicing... More like playing a video game.



Tuners never get grease on their hands? Really? Guess all that stuff I got on my hands when I replaced my turbo/manifold for performance turbo and manifold, removed my EGR/DPF/SCR, installed turbo back exhaust, installed head studs, and so on was not actually grease?

Tuning doesn't create horsepower. Hard parts still do. Tuning only unleashes it.


That is really good stuff. These dolts building and tuning 800 plus hp daily drivers just don't know how to work on engines. Just try and imagine 800 hp 40 years ago and tell me that wouldn’t be an absolute handful to drive much less taking it to work every day.

Sometimes we let nostalgia get in the way of reality.

danrclem

Ky.

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Joined: 12/25/2015

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Posted: 11/12/19 09:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

colliehauler wrote:

danrclem wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

colliehauler wrote:

Grit dog wrote:

^Yeah GM is still sucking wind in the gas HD truck engines, even with the new 6.6. Maybe they'll be under rated, hopefully.
As to old engines, what about 351M Ford big blocks, 360 GM truck motors and old 360 Chrysler big blocks.
LS7 is a really big small block too.....
Ford had two 351 engines a Windsor and a Cleveland one a small block the other a big block. Wasn't the original GM big block a 348 porcupine?


I thought both the W and C engines were small blocks and the M was a big block, but I don't know Fords very well. I do know parts aren't interchangeable worth a cr@p between an old 302 and a 351 though.
Ha, didn't know the 348 was the predecessor to the 409. Makes sense as the 348 was the big engine before the 409.
Learn something new every day!


The 351 Windsor is basically the same block as a 302 with a taller deck. The 351 heads will fit on the 221, 260, 289 and 302 but the compression will be low unless you make other changes. The intake and rotating assembly won't interchange without modifications. The 351 Cleveland is a 335 series engine and it's physically larger than the 351 Windsor. Don't know if it would be considered a big block or not but I doubt it. The 385 series (429, 460) was considered a big block. The Boss 302 was a hybrid. It had the Windsor style block with Cleveland heads. There were some modifications made to make it work.

The original Ford (FE-Ford Edsel) big block started out with a 332 and I think the 352 may have been made the first year too but not sure. They also made a 360, 390, 406, 410, 427 and 428 FE engines. I think there were also some different displacement engines made just for bigger trucks.

They had another big block engine that was only put into Mercury, Edsels and Lincolns called the MEL. MEL stood for Mercury, Edsel and Lincoln. Not sure about all of the displacements of them but one was a 383.
I don't know if the Cleveland was actually considered a big block but it was physically larger then the Windsor so we always referred to it as a big block.

I remember GM had a V-6 made out of a big block motor in the GMC trucks mid sixties vintage, don't remember the displacement.

I also remember mid seventies when Dodge put a non turbo Diesel Mitsubishi in a pickup long before the Cummins.


Yeah I definitely wouldn't consider a Cleveland a small block but the reason that I wouldn't think it would be considered a big block is because the 429 came out at the same time or about the same time and it was bigger than the Cleveland. Might be a tweener. [emoticon]

I'm really anxious to see what the 7.3 can do in real world tests. I think I'd like to have one if they'll do what I think they will but if I ever do it won't be anytime soon.

Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Joined: 04/08/2002

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Posted: 11/13/19 01:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mich800 wrote:

ShinerBock wrote:

Huntindog wrote:



Those were the days when Hot rodders actually got into the inner workings of motors, porting heads, lapping valves, fitting piston rings. installing cams.... Nowadays most just tap on a keyboard and "tune" a motor... The Tuners never get any grease/oil on their hands. Hard to see that as mechanicing... More like playing a video game.



Tuners never get grease on their hands? Really? Guess all that stuff I got on my hands when I replaced my turbo/manifold for performance turbo and manifold, removed my EGR/DPF/SCR, installed turbo back exhaust, installed head studs, and so on was not actually grease?

Tuning doesn't create horsepower. Hard parts still do. Tuning only unleashes it.


That is really good stuff. These dolts building and tuning 800 plus hp daily drivers just don't know how to work on engines. Just try and imagine 800 hp 40 years ago and tell me that wouldn’t be an absolute handful to drive much less taking it to work every day.

Sometimes we let nostalgia get in the way of reality.

As usual, some respond without reading,/comprehending my entire post.

HINT: I said MOST!!
I stand by that statement.
If it doesn't apply to you..... Don't get your panties in a bunch.

BTW..... 797 HP is available stock. No need to even tune it.


colliehauler

Mc Pherson KS USA

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Joined: 01/27/2004

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Posted: 11/13/19 04:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I think Ford picked the 7.3 liter displacement to capitalize on the reputation of the old 7.3 Diesel. It sounds like it's built very stout and should preform well. Will be interesting to see what it does in the real world for mpg and performance. My 19 year old V-10 manual transmission is still going strong after 200k miles. I just took it on a 800 mile trip last weekend (solo) and averaged 13.75 mpg.

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