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fj12ryder

Platte City, MO

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Posted: 11/13/19 10:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Johno02 wrote:

Nobody seems to notice that many trains and busses have run on electricity for many years, in a lot of major cities and mainline rail service. And without any batteries at all! If you really want to run all electric transportation, just go back and look at how it was, and is being done. It is called overhead power lines, and it WORKS!
And looks absolutely horrible. And pretty inefficient too I think. And pretty expensive to install and maintain all the lines necessary.


Howard and Peggy

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Lwiddis

Los Angeles area :(

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Posted: 11/13/19 11:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"It turns out, with cold weather (It got down to 5 degrees last night, yes, Nov 13), the batteries won't hold a charge! HA! Millions of dollars spent and now the busses won't hold enough charge to even finish a single run."

I'll bet the engineers KNEW of this potential problem.

* This post was edited 11/13/19 11:37am by an administrator/moderator *

time2roll

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Posted: 11/13/19 11:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The good thing is that these buses are in place for both the operator and manufacturer to gain experience and improve the service. This first round should not have been expected to kill all the existing diesel buses immediately. However the electrics will improve and they will keep coming.

With near continuous charging and usage I am not sure how the batteries are actually getting so cold. Maybe there is just a resistance heater for the comfort of the passengers.

* This post was edited 11/13/19 11:22am by time2roll *


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wildtoad

Blythewood, SC

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Posted: 11/13/19 02:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Batteries in all flavors hate cold. People hate cold. Vehicles with only batteries with need to provide both momentum and heat in the winter cooling in the summer. I’m sure at some point the technology will provide a solution. Putting overhead power lines on all interstate hiway, secondary roads seems a bit radical and ugly. Electric only vehicles are good in some situations. A hybrid where a power source (propane, hydrogen, ... ) can provide sufficient power the vehicle and recharge the batteries at the same time may be useful.


Tom Wilds
Blythewood, SC
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pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 11/13/19 03:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

philh wrote:

Third factor, an electric vehicle costs more to produce, a lot more. Govt subsidies have masked it until now. That is changing, and customers are voting with their pocket book.


Hi Phil,

Over a 5 year period a Bev costs 40% less than an Ice, including the purchase price. This estimate is based on 'cradle to grave' data.

The Ice dealers make a lot of money from service--and it not an accident that specialized tools are required.

Bev service requirements are much lower--essentially tires and items such as windshield wipers. Because of regenerative braking, pads and rotors may last a lot lover. Life span of the entire vehicle most likely will be far longer.

When we get to electric trucks it may be that the initial price is lower than an ice.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

fj12ryder

Platte City, MO

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Posted: 11/13/19 04:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I read about this extensive service on ICE vehicles, and honestly I keep my vehicles for 8-10 years and my money spent isn't that much. As far as a 5-year period, pshaw. I've had my cheapo Hyundai for 2 years so far and spent a grand total of $5 for a tail light bulb, air filters, oil filters, and oil. Wait a minute, I did buy two windshield wipers.

I bought it used with 24,000 miles, and paid less than $9500. It now has 36,000 miles, gets around 30 mpg. I can easily see it going another 3 years with about the same cost. Although I may need brakes and tires in a couple years.

So I should have been able to get an EV for around $5000?

gbopp

The Keystone State

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Posted: 11/13/19 05:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DutchmenSport wrote:

I'm a 100% skeptic that true electric vehicles, especially trucks for towing RV trailers and such, will ever work successfully.

That's probably what they said when Henry Ford started selling the Model T.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 11/13/19 06:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I was comparing new to new. My Hyundai Elantra (2013), which I enjoy, had a 5 year warranty. In order to keep that, I had to follow their recommended service. It was between 700 and 1000 per year to do so. I bought at a reduced price as it was a demo.

Expensive? Well, not when they had to replace the short block.

Now that I'm off warranty it will not get much more than oil changes, tires, brakes, and windshield wipers.

philh

Belleville MI

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Posted: 11/13/19 06:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:


Over a 5 year period a Bev costs 40% less than an Ice, including the purchase price. This estimate is based on 'cradle to grave' data.

Please cite your source for this data

philh

Belleville MI

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Posted: 11/13/19 06:17pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

I was comparing new to new. My Hyundai Elantra (2013), which I enjoy, had a 5 year warranty. In order to keep that, I had to follow their recommended service. It was between 700 and 1000 per year to do so.

That sounds like a HORRIBLE "deal".
5 vehicles since 2007... still own the '07. Other than oil and filter changes, not one single repair that wouldn't also be present on BEV vehicle. Tires (granted the Charger and Chally eat more rubber than a BEV), brakes, couple of chassis or electrical repairs, which a BEV could also have.

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