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opnspaces

San Diego Ca

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Posted: 11/14/19 04:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:


1500W IS 1500W worth of heat, doesn't matter the brand (vornado et all)or type (Oil vs fan vs ceramic).

1500W of heat with a fan pushing it can end up making you feel colder the further you are away from it due to cooler temperature of the forced air making it feel drafty.

Your choice, pick your poison but 1500W is 1500W and that is not changing..


To further what Gdetrailer is saying. A portable space heater is limited to 1500 watts. That means if it is a fanless model you will get 1500w of heat output. But if you add a fan, that power has to come out of the 1500W. If the heater fan uses 100 watts, your heater is only going to put out 1400W of heat. (1500-100=1400)

I like to view space heaters like the food at taco bell. It's all the same ingredients, just pick the shape you want.


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time2roll

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Posted: 11/14/19 04:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Yup all heaters are about 1500 watts or about 5200 BTU. You can have radiant, convection or forced air. Expensive or cheep they all produce the same heat.

If it is that cold we run our 1200 watt convection radiator style on max and supplement with the furnace as needed.

You could run two or more but you might start tripping circuit breakers.


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ScottG

Bothell Wa.

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Posted: 11/14/19 05:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

opnspaces wrote:

Gdetrailer wrote:


1500W IS 1500W worth of heat, doesn't matter the brand (vornado et all)or type (Oil vs fan vs ceramic).

1500W of heat with a fan pushing it can end up making you feel colder the further you are away from it due to cooler temperature of the forced air making it feel drafty.

Your choice, pick your poison but 1500W is 1500W and that is not changing..


To further what Gdetrailer is saying. A portable space heater is limited to 1500 watts. That means if it is a fanless model you will get 1500w of heat output. But if you add a fan, that power has to come out of the 1500W. If the heater fan uses 100 watts, your heater is only going to put out 1400W of heat. (1500-100=1400)

I like to view space heaters like the food at taco bell. It's all the same ingredients, just pick the shape you want.


I used to sell space heaters at an ACE H/W I managed. I also have an engineering backgorund so when the owners wanted the most efficient heater, I had to explain that they were all 99%+ efficient. Look at the specs for a 1500 watt oil filled or fan forced heater. They both put out 5200 BTU. No reason a fan would take 100 Watts in this application anyway. From the specs the fan doesn't make an appreciable difference and most of what ever energy it uses is going to be returned in heat anyway.
An oil filled doen't make anymore heat than a simple milk house heater or one of those fancy $300 units.

* This post was edited 11/14/19 05:14pm by ScottG *


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opnspaces

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Posted: 11/14/19 05:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Agreed, I only used 100w for the easy subtraction and to make the point obvious. [emoticon]

Lwiddis

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Posted: 11/14/19 05:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If your current 1500 watt electric heater won’t keep you warm, how are your water tanks and lines doing?


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Lantley

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Posted: 11/14/19 05:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Gdetrailer wrote:
5,000 BTU of heat out of one heater is a LONG, LONG stretch for heating an entire RV when considering it is a fraction of the heat a RV furnace can put out
While I generally agree with your point. You have to consider the efficiency of the lp furnace when comparing to a space heater.
Space heaters are 100% efficient. The lp furnace is far from efficient. I believe they are about 70% efficient and maybe as bad as 505 efficient.
If you hold your hand in front of the exterior exhaust discharge you will feel a lot of wasted heat being discharged to the outdoors.
That heat translates to $$$.
Efficiency ratings are a big deal when it comes to residential furnaces. RV furnaces are very inefficient compared to residential models.


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Gulfcoast

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Posted: 11/14/19 06:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I prefer oil filled heaters and here's why.....

I agree that an oil-filled heater is still around 1500-watts, but when the oil is hot the thermostat will turn the element off and the heater will keep on heating (with the element off) for a long time. It's kinda like a car coasting down a long hill and using very little gas.

The time between off and on cycles is way longer than my plain ole electric heater, and that's saving me money. Turn the heater off or unplug it and it will keep heating until the oil completely cools down to room temperature.

pianotuna

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Posted: 11/14/19 07:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi,

Run two oil filled heaters on the #2 setting on different circuits.

Be aware that power does go down by the square of the voltage.


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ktmrfs

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Posted: 11/14/19 07:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

mooky stinks wrote:

We use the oil filled radiator type. Although they're also 1500watts, they produce more heat than our ceramic heater ever did. They have 3 heat settings and a thermostat and the best thing is they're completely quiet except for a click when they turn on/off. We have 2 in a 31ft trailer and they'll keep it very comfortable down into the 30's.


it may feel like it makes more heat, and it may be more comfortable but 1500W=5100BTU in an electric resistance element heater. ceramic, oil filled etc. makes no difference.


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Posted: 11/14/19 08:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

opnspaces wrote:


To further what Gdetrailer is saying. A portable space heater is limited to 1500 watts. That means if it is a fanless model you will get 1500w of heat output. But if you add a fan, that power has to come out of the 1500W. If the heater fan uses 100 watts, your heater is only going to put out 1400W of heat...


Sort of but not quite, consider that the energy consumed by the fan is turned into, wait for it, heat. Yes, heat.


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