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Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > Why Tesla's are bad at towing!

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mich800

Pontiac, MI

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Posted: 12/05/19 09:54am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ShinerBock wrote:

Funny part is, he is an actual Tesla owner and has made many pro-Tesla videos in the past. I guess he and the guys at TFL are right, the Tesla fanboys are fanatical and will go after you if you say anything that they perceive as a negative about Tesla regardless if it is true or not. Almost like a cult.


He is most definitely an electric vehicle proponent.

ford truck guy

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Posted: 12/05/19 09:59am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Charlie D. wrote:

Tesla said they have a goal of installing solar panels on the roof.


BUT . . . . .

Adding a solar panel on the roof of that new Tesla truck will only add about 30-40 miles per day... I have no data on that other than our resident Tesla Cult Member here in the office has stated it several times a day... [emoticon]


Me-Her-the kids
2020 Ford F350 SD 6.7
2020 Redwood 3991RD Garnet


pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 12/05/19 10:05am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

How many folks tow at 75 miles per hour? 55 would make more sense.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

Jack_Diane_Freedom

Burlington Ontario Canada

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Posted: 12/05/19 10:07am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

One could not drive from coast to coast in 1910 because of the lack of fueling stations and automobile infrastructure. Give it another 50 years and the EV infrastructure and battery technology will be in place and the ICE will be done.

Groover

Pulaski, TN

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Posted: 12/05/19 10:53am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"All marketing hype with no data.

1. Range with how much weight?"

Weight really isn't important. It takes very little power to keep weight moving. Just a little extra tire flex. Where vehicles are hurt by weight is when brakes have to be used to take energy out of the system for stopping and speed control.

More weight actually tilts the scale in favor of an electric truck since it can use regen to recapture about 90% of the energy that would normally be lost to braking.

The real issue on long trips is air drag. This concerns me more because the range of the pickup is given without a trailer. The truck itself is very aerodynamic. This means that a typical trailer with little or no thought given to aerodynamics is going to be felt much more than it would be behind a regular truck. It is going to be interesting to see how much impact trailers have on fuel economy. It might even be worthwhile making the bed cover come straight back from the high point to reduce the amount of wind hitting the trailer.

"2. Acceleration with 80k pounds. How much is profit generating payload not the extra weight of batteries?"

This depends a lot on what you are hauling. My understanding is that a large percentage of box trucks on the road are limited by volume, not weight. Walmart is a big early purchaser and I know that their trucks are generally pretty light. Battery powered trucks should qualify for the weight bonus given to trucks with an APU since they also have eliminated main engine idling.

Groover

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Posted: 12/05/19 10:56am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

How many folks tow at 75 miles per hour? 55 would make more sense.


Too many.

mich800

Pontiac, MI

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Posted: 12/05/19 11:10am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Groover wrote:

"All marketing hype with no data.

1. Range with how much weight?"

Weight really isn't important. It takes very little power to keep weight moving. Just a little extra tire flex. Where vehicles are hurt by weight is when brakes have to be used to take energy out of the system for stopping and speed control.

More weight actually tilts the scale in favor of an electric truck since it can use regen to recapture about 90% of the energy that would normally be lost to braking.

The real issue on long trips is air drag. This concerns me more because the range of the pickup is given without a trailer. The truck itself is very aerodynamic. This means that a typical trailer with little or no thought given to aerodynamics is going to be felt much more than it would be behind a regular truck. It is going to be interesting to see how much impact trailers have on fuel economy. It might even be worthwhile making the bed cover come straight back from the high point to reduce the amount of wind hitting the trailer.

"2. Acceleration with 80k pounds. How much is profit generating payload not the extra weight of batteries?"

This depends a lot on what you are hauling. My understanding is that a large percentage of box trucks on the road are limited by volume, not weight. Walmart is a big early purchaser and I know that their trucks are generally pretty light. Battery powered trucks should qualify for the weight bonus given to trucks with an APU since they also have eliminated main engine idling.


1. Sure, maybe going downhill or flat. I will wait for the evidence that pulling a combined 80k takes an immaterial amount more energy than pulling empty.

2. So you agree pure marketing BS.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 12/05/19 11:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Charlie D. wrote:

Tesla said they have a goal of installing solar panels on the roof.


ROFL


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 12/05/19 11:24am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

How many folks tow at 75 miles per hour? 55 would make more sense.


Me. (Depends what I'm towing and where)

time2roll

Southern California

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Posted: 12/05/19 11:39am Link  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Grit dog wrote:

Charlie D. wrote:

Tesla said they have a goal of installing solar panels on the roof.
ROFL
Yea more like the roof of your home or business.


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
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