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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Towing in slick conditions

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Twistedlarch

Cottage Grove, OR.

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Posted: 12/22/19 10:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hi all

I'll be most likely towing my TT over the pass in slick conditions next week.

Trailer: 3,800 lb single axle
Truck: Toyota Tundra 4x4

While I consider myself to be an expert in Winter conditions I've never had the opportunity to tow a trailer in slick conditions.

My truck is fully equipped for Winter driving and I do have chains for both tow vehicle and trailer. I will not hesitate to chain up the trailer.

A lot of it is common sense but I am looking for some pointers/do's and don'ts of towing in snowy/icy conditions.

Thanks!
Brian

'tiredTeacher

Richmond, VA

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Posted: 12/22/19 11:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Have you done a "search" of this site yet? I seem to remember a discussion of this last year and a lot of folks from Colorado, Idaho and Utah chimed in with good advice.

Good luck,
Teach


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North jersey

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Posted: 12/22/19 11:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Practice putting on your truck and trailer chains home before you head out


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time2roll

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Posted: 12/22/19 12:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Slow and steady arrives safely.


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rhagfo

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Posted: 12/22/19 12:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If from Cottage Grove is it safe to assume headed over Santiam Pass? I think that is the highest commonly used pass in the state about 4,500’ or so. It can get pretty bad at times, just watch “Trip Check” and plan according.


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Twistedlarch

Cottage Grove, OR.

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Posted: 12/22/19 12:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rhagfo wrote:

If from Cottage Grove is it safe to assume headed over Santiam Pass? I think that is the highest commonly used pass in the state about 4,500’ or so. It can get pretty bad at times, just watch “Trip Check” and plan according.


Headed for Sisters, so it'll be via 126/Santiam. My kids have a 5 day Ski race camp up at Hoodoo ski area [emoticon]

carringb

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Posted: 12/22/19 01:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I used to tow over Santiam Pass twice a weekend (commuting home when I was building one of the Facebook buildings).

Santiam Pass is well maintained. So is the 126. Highway 20 is not. It's the lowest priority, so if there's an incident on 22, they'll defer snow clearing on 20.

If there's an incident on 126, I'd recommend going all the way north to 22 rather than taking the 20 "shortcut", especially if you haven't towed over it in good weather. It's steeper, and has nearly 20 miles of slow speed corners.

They do patrol Santiam pass for chains violations, so if the signs are up, definitely chain up. It's unfortunately a necessity, because of the number of out-of-state truckers who ignore the signs.


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Lwiddis

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Posted: 12/22/19 01:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I try not to tow when chains for the TV and TT are necessary but when I do it’s SLOW and CAREFUL. Not too worried about me but those chainless speeders are nuts.

* This post was edited 12/22/19 03:23pm by Lwiddis *


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Posted: 12/22/19 02:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

You may need to adjust brake controller settings. It can be tough to modulate gently to avoid lockup on slick surface

BobsYourUncle

Calgary Alberta Canada

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Posted: 12/22/19 03:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've done lots of towing in slick winter conditions.
Good advice above, common sense, slow and easy especially on downhill corners.
About 5 years ago I was towing uphill in winter conditions, in a right hand gradual corner. Didn't see the black ice. I suddenly started to jacknife. Got about 20 degrees into going sideways. First thing I did was get off the throttle right now and leave the brake pedal alone. Brake pedal is your enemy if you are sliding on ice. I instinctively reached down and grabbed the trailer brakes, not real hard but enough to slow the wheels from turning. This action pulled my truck and trailer straight, then I steered out of it until I was back in control.
I was halfway into the opposite lane by then, but fortunately there was nobody there.
Scared the stuffin out of me, and I slowed down even more.
The roads looked bare at the time.

This worked for me when I got into trouble towing.


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