RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Tech Issues: Changing Atwood water heater plug to brass

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Changing Atwood water heater plug to brass

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Next
Sponsored By:
msmith1199

Reno, NV

Senior Member

Joined: 10/07/2001

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 12/29/19 08:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I had to move my motorhome from it’s previous storage to a new place and the new place isn’t heated. So for the first time in 15 years I have to winterize. But since I use it during the winter I want to make winterizing as easy as possible because I’ll have to do it a few times each winter.

I see a brass 1/2” plug with a petcock valve on it on Amazon. Is there any problem with using this instead of the plastic plugs they come with? Seems easier to just open the petcock valve versus messing with the plastic plug.


2004 National Tropi-Cal T-350, Class A, Triple slide, 330 HP Cat DP.
2017 Jeep Wrangler Sport


MDKMDK

Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 10/15/2008

View Profile



Posted: 12/29/19 08:23pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Should work, as long as it doesn't get plugged up with scale and calcium when you go to drain it. If your water source isn't too hard, it should be fine. If it does get plugged, have a wrench handy.


Mike.
2018 (2017 Sprinter Cab Chassis) Navion24V + 2016 JKU (sold @ ????)
2016 Sunstar 26HE, V10, 3V, 6 Speed (sold @ 4600 miles)
2002 Roadtrek C190P (sold @ 315,000kms)

Williebago

Wichita, KS, USA

Full Member

Joined: 03/07/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Online
Posted: 12/29/19 08:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I replaced the plastic plug with brass fittings and a 3/8" ball valve 17 years ago for that vary reason. No problems and still working just fine. Also makes it real easy to blow the crud and sediment out of the bottom of the tank


WILLIEBAGO

2019 Newmar Baystar 3626, F53, 252"WB with 6.8L gas engine
2003 Jeep Liberty Limited Toad
2 cockapoos, Jordy and Nelson, who love RVing

Go K-State Wildcats

BFL13

Victoria, BC

Senior Member

Joined: 02/15/2006

View Profile



Posted: 12/29/19 08:38pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We just had a thread on that, where ISTR the pros said it was a bad idea due to brass and aluminum issues. It sure is a PITA getting that plastic plug in and out though.

https://www.rv.net/forum/index.cfm/fusea........d/29997558/gotomsg/29997635.cfm#29997635

* This post was edited 12/29/19 08:53pm by BFL13 *


1991 Oakland 28DB Class C
on Ford E350-460-7.5 Gas EFI
See Profile for House electronics set-up.

MDKMDK

Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 10/15/2008

View Profile



Posted: 12/29/19 10:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Interesting discussion. Seemed like it was mostly about anode rod/plug combo, or not. The one quote, taken from the "Atwood Manual", by mobewan(?) made no reference to not using a brass plug/valve fitting, just said no need to replace an anode rod, probably because they don't have one, as far as I know. The rest of the nay sayers were the usual gaggle of "experts w/opinions".
Do what works for you. If you put the brass fitting in carefully, you'll never need to remove/replace it, and your "delicate aluminum threads" will be safe forever. [emoticon]

navigator2346

texas

Full Member

Joined: 03/29/2019

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/29/19 10:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you install the brass plug with the petcock, how are you going to flush the tank? You still have to remove the plug. The tank should be flushed on a regular basis to remove the deposits that settle on the bottom of the tank. Atwood installed a plastic plug for a reason, not to be cheap

MrWizard

Traveling

Moderator

Joined: 06/27/2004

View Profile



Posted: 12/29/19 10:49pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I am considering a brass plug, as my plastic plug and delicate Alu threads are leaking, even with Teflon tape on the plastic plug

Going to follow this thread

Maybe some pipe dope on a new plastic plug ?

I do drain once a year , and would prefer for it to be removable


Radiate The Happy
....

Connected using Verizon and AT&T
1997 F53 Bounder 36s


mobeewan

Hampton, Va

Senior Member

Joined: 01/03/2007

View Profile



Posted: 12/30/19 12:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The biggest issue with using the brass plug is it's harder than aluminum and you could damage the tank threads if you're not careful. Some people worry too much that the brass can also cause galvanic corrosion with the tank. Galvanic corrosion is a problem when you have metals that are too dissimilar causing them to react with each other.

Although brass and aluminum are dissimilar metals they are closer together on the galvanic chart and should not react too badly with each other. Steel and aluminum are very far apart on the galvanic chart and will react badly with each other. This can be seen by the white chalky deposits when using stainless steel fasteners with aluminum material. Steel and aluminum are the worst.

As far as galvanic corrosion the Atwood tanks also have a bronze relief valve, a gas/temperature control valve which is made out of pot metal with a copper probe that extends into the tank and whatever the material the fittings that screw into the water inlet and water outlet of the tank are made of, so over all the brass is not going to be that harmful. The tank already has dissimilar metals threaded into it that don't cause a serious problem.

For a long time I had a brass nipple with a brass ball valve screwed into an Atwood Tank with no ill effects. Someone on The Forum had a wire braided hose screwed into the tank drain hole that had a valve on the opposite end of the hose and it seemed to work fine for them. They were able to lay the hose over the door on the water heater so the valve could drain directly to the ground.

You are best off using the plastic plugs if available but as long as you're careful getting the threads lined up brass will be okay, just don't crank down too hard when you install it.

midnightsadie

ohio

Senior Member

Joined: 01/07/2008

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/30/19 04:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

you can use plastic nipple and a plastic valve.

bid_time

Michigan

Senior Member

Joined: 08/18/2006

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 12/30/19 05:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've had a brass plug in my water heater for over 15 years. I remove it after every trip to drain the water heater. Never had an issue. I had more problems with the OEM plug. That's why i now have a brass one.





Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 5  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Changing Atwood water heater plug to brass
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Tech Issues


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.