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Open Roads Forum  >  Tech Issues

 > Changing Atwood water heater plug to brass

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dougrainer

Carrolton, Texas

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Posted: 12/31/19 11:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

opnspaces wrote:

At the risk of Murphy or some other mythical rule maker biting me in the butt for admitting this. I'm am still using the original 15 year old nylon plug in my Atwood and I remove it often. The key is don't overtighten it.
Most people overtighten fasteners and in the case of the nylon plug it's easy to do.

Try it my way and I guarantee no leaks and you will stop cursing the nylon plug.

How to remove the plug:
  • Get the socket that fits the plug and a 6 inch extension.
  • Using your fingers slide the socket only up onto the plug.
  • Now hold the socket on the plug with one finger while you use your other hand to snap the extension into the socket.
  • Use a ratchet handle to loosen the plug.
  • Remove the ratchet handle and use your fingers on the 6 inch extension to unscrew the plug.


How to install the plug:
  • Using your fingers start the plug
  • Slide the socket only up onto the plug.
  • Now hold the socket on the plug with one finger while you use your other hand to snap the extension into the socket.
  • Tighten the plug with just your fingers on the extension until it's snug.
  • Put the ratchen handle in the extension.
  • Now tighten only about a 12th of a turn.(like from 12 -1 on a clock face).


That's it, it really doesn't have to be any tighter than that.


The only reason to add the extension is to make it easier to remove the end plug. If you have large hands(fingers) like I do and slight Arthritus, it can be difficult to start the plastic plug. Doug

ksg5000

Oregon

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Posted: 12/31/19 11:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Dusty R wrote:

larry cad wrote:

TurnThePage wrote:

dougrainer wrote:

DFORD pic looked plastic. You can get a Plastic type extension and do the same thing DFORD has done without using metal. Doug
Would that plastic be rated for the heat?


PVC pipe is used frequently in hot water systems.


NOT PVC but CPVC is rated for both hot and cold water.

Dusty


Recall that you should CPVC rated 80 not std 40 for hot water - not a plumbing guy just something I ran across when doing a rental "fix".


Kevin

deltabravo

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Posted: 01/01/20 07:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I've had less than stellar results with the anode rod / petcock drain plug device


The petcock self destructed and became useless


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drsteve

Michigan

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Posted: 01/01/20 08:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

deltabravo wrote:

I've had less than stellar results with the anode rod / petcock drain plug device


The petcock self destructed and became useless


I don't like the reduced flow on these. Seeing one fall apart is just another reason to stick with the nylon plug, IMHO.


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RayJayco

Tampa

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Posted: 01/02/20 08:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have found that Nickel Anti-seize is a great go between on many dissimilar metals, especially steel and aluminum, although others as well. It is what I used on mine about 6 years ago.


Inquiring minds want to know...

wolfe10

Texas

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Posted: 01/02/20 09:09am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have always stayed with Atwood's own nylon drain plug-- about $1 and no worries about galvanic reaction (where the aluminum tank is pretty much always the anode and will "give its life" to protect the more noble metal of anything screwed into it).

When draining and flushing (part of annual water heater service) I use a piece of aluminum foil tucked up under the drain and leading down over the side of the coach to route the minerals and water from flush (with 50/50 white vinegar then clear water) away from the coach.


Brett Wolfe
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Old-Biscuit

Verde Valley

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Posted: 01/02/20 11:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

drsteve wrote:

deltabravo wrote:

I've had less than stellar results with the anode rod / petcock drain plug device


The petcock self destructed and became useless


I don't like the reduced flow on these. Seeing one fall apart is just another reason to stick with the nylon plug, IMHO.


That link is for a Suburban Brand that uses an anode rod.

Petcocks reduce the flow and do not allow for crud/scale to exit from the tank


DFORD has a simple modification that does NOT hinder draining
And IF you want to really move the crud out......remove the drain plug and turn water supply ON.
Cold inlet dip tube points down...full pressure will stir the bottom of tank up and BLAST it out the drain hole (especially on an Attwood with only a 1/2" hole)


Is it time for your medication or mine?


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drsteve

Michigan

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Posted: 01/02/20 07:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Old-Biscuit wrote:



IF you want to really move the crud out......remove the drain plug and turn water supply ON.
Cold inlet dip tube points down...full pressure will stir the bottom of tank up and BLAST it out the drain hole (especially on an Attwood with only a 1/2" hole)


I like it, thanks for that!

wolfe10

Texas

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Posted: 01/02/20 07:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Another good option for removing mineral deposits is to "vacuum then out".

5' of cheap clear vinyl hose. With tank full, but not pressurized remove plug insert hose and start a siphon with it. Move the tank end round the bottom of the tank-- you will see in the clear hose what you are vacuuming out (and when you all you get is clear water.

If it hasn't been done in a couple of years, may have to refill tank and repeat.

tarnold

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Posted: 01/04/20 07:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just went to Lowe’s and got brass fixtures like dford $$$. Had to take a punch and indent the bottom of the frame were the end plug terminates about an 1/8”. Just to tight to unscrew drain cap. Easy pezzy to drain now. If I want to flush, a garden hose will screw on with end cap removed.

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