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Naio

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Posted: 01/21/20 04:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I did the bucket and bag thing, for my first five years of 1/2 to 3/4 time van living. I'm now doing the portapotty thing, and emptying it in a sewer cleanout. They both have their pluses and minuses.

I don't ever plan to put a black tank in my van. Seems like too much work for not very much benefit. But I might use it if I had boughv a pre-made RV.


3/4 timing in a DIY van conversion. Backroads, mountains, boondocking, sometimes big cities for a change of pace.


valhalla360

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Posted: 01/21/20 10:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Naio wrote:

.

A composting toilet used to be something that did the composting itself. Meaning it would hold several years worth of poop.


When was this?

Composting (toilet or otherwise) shouldn't take anywhere close to years. If it's taking years, it's not composting.

Full timing, you will have the last few deposits uncomposted but if operating normally, no odor and looks like rich soil right after mixing. On ours, you could slip a garbage bag over the top, flip it and never come into contact with the contents.

If you are not using it full time, let it sit for a week or two and no visible remnants. Great for your flowerbeds.


Tammy & Mike
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Naio

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Posted: 01/22/20 10:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Municipal laws that allow composting toilets usually require a two-year period of composting for any sort of animal waste, including composting toilet contents.

A skilled composter, using the right inoculants, huge quantities of poo, and operating in a warm climate, could probably get compost much more quickly than that.

But in a cool climate, and in quantities produced by just a few people, it takes some time before you get a product that is safe to put on your salad greens. And that's when compost is finished -- when it is safe to handle and use in a garden without burying it.

Deb and Ed M

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Posted: 01/23/20 08:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Naio wrote:



I don't ever plan to put a black tank in my van. Seems like too much work for not very much benefit. But I might use it if I had boughv a pre-made RV.


Back when we had our Class C; and then a 5er, returning to Michigan during bitter cold was just simpler to keep the RV fully winterized, and use the good ol' Luggable Loo when needed.

The last time we shopped for an RV, we realized that manufacturers were ignoring the all-important ease-of-winterization. A few models, even the dealers couldn't explain how to winterize :-(

As we pondered our cargo van conversion, one feature we absolutely wanted was "no winterizing". It's nice to not haul around gallons of antifreeze.

valhalla360

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Posted: 01/23/20 10:42pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Naio wrote:

Municipal laws that allow composting toilets usually require a two-year period of composting for any sort of animal waste, including composting toilet contents.

A skilled composter, using the right inoculants, huge quantities of poo, and operating in a warm climate, could probably get compost much more quickly than that.

But in a cool climate, and in quantities produced by just a few people, it takes some time before you get a product that is safe to put on your salad greens. And that's when compost is finished -- when it is safe to handle and use in a garden without burying it.


If you want to use it in a vegetable garden maybe (I said flower garden). Of course that's municipal rules where they really don't want to encourage anything but a flush toilet. Plus finding the room to store several months waste is a lot easier in a residential building, so there was no point in pushing back even if the rule was silly.

Doesn't take much "skill" to compost. An RV in use is plenty warm and every time you sit down, you add "innoculants".

I'm guessing you grew up in the city. Farmers certainly don't wait two years before putting manure on fields.

Naio

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Posted: 01/23/20 11:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I grew up on a farm and I currently teach small-scale farming.

The farmers I know do compost their manure until it is safe. That time frame is, of course, different for ruminants or birds than for human manure.

You sound like your knowledge mostly comes from YouTube. Don't forget to get both your hepatitis vaccines.

1L243

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Posted: 01/24/20 12:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Eliminating a black tank to install a composting toilet has a inconvenient factor of 8 and a yuck factor of 9!

I would go with a composting toilet if it was a last and only option.


2017 Coleman 300tq by Dutchman Toy Hauler. 34.5 feet long and under 10k Gross. 1999 Ford F250 2WD 7.3 4R100 DP Tuner, S&B Cold Air Intake, Gauges, 6.0 Trans Cooler, Air Bags.


CavemanCharlie

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Posted: 01/26/20 05:13pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When I camp in cold weather I just use of of those port-potties and a bag. Maybe that would work for you.

Some of the Live In My Cabin In The Woods videos that I watch when I'm bored say that saw dust in a bucket works better then a composting toilet. Then you just throw away the saw dust. But, I have never tried it.

fj12ryder

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Posted: 01/26/20 06:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Naio wrote:

I grew up on a farm and I currently teach small-scale farming.

The farmers I know do compost their manure until it is safe. That time frame is, of course, different for ruminants or birds than for human manure.

You sound like your knowledge mostly comes from YouTube. Don't forget to get both your hepatitis vaccines.
I grew up on a farm in Iowa, and composting was an unknown word back then. You mucked out the barn in the summer/fall/winter, and used that manure on the fields in the spring. It sure didn't sit for no two years.


Howard and Peggy

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Naio

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Posted: 01/26/20 06:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As I said, that is fine for ruminants. Things like sheep and cows and horses. But if you look into it you'll find that human poop is different.

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