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 > engine longevity?

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pushtoy 2

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Posted: 01/30/20 05:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have seen v10 go 250k with reasonable care the coach will be junk b4 you wear out the chassis


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pnichols

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Posted: 01/30/20 02:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

billy1davis wrote:

Seems like most c's and b's run gassers. Also seems like they go up for sale around 50 to 60 k on the odometer.
So what is the experience out there. Is that all the engines have in them for longevity...around 50 to 60 k?


We have a gasser Class C based on the Ford E450 V10 chassis. Regarding reliability as the years add up ... I'm not concerned about coach components or the Ford V10 engine, itself, "failing".

We sometimes take our Class C out into somewhat remote areas of the Western U.S. and don't tow along a 2nd vehicle and as such, are more concerned with the reliability of the overall chassis system so that we don't get left sitting way out there somewhere in a rig that won't move.

Here are some things I loose sleep over on RV trips, occurance of which won't necessarily be prevented even by "good factory recommended maintenance" :

- A failed/failing fuel pump,
- A blown fuel pump fuse that I can't locate where it's at or don't have a spare along for,
- A failed serpentine belt,
- A failed/failing alternator,
- A failed/failing water pump,
- A leak that developes in the radiator or it's hoses,
- A leak or rupture in a brake line,
- A failed cooling fan clutch causing the fan to no longer spin,
- A leak that developes in the fuel line,and
- Etc..

As some degree of defense against those type of failures above, we carry along a satellite communication device for no-signal cellular areas, assuming we at the time have enough headroom left on our credit card and that some form of ERS help will even venture off highway to get to our RV.


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

IAMICHABOD

Sunny So Cal 90713

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Posted: 01/30/20 02:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As most have said these are built on a commercial chassis and are designed to last,with proper maintenance they will easily go for more than 200000 miles. Rental companies usually sell after 100000 miles.

There are more than 100 Members here that own them,some have gone over 200000 miles and have not yet heard of any engine failures and only 2 transmission failures,both covered under warranty.


2006 TIOGA 26Q CHEVY 6.0 WORKHORSE VORTEC
Former El Monte RV Rental

Buying A Rental Class C

Chevrolet Based Class C


klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 01/30/20 02:40pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As I have previously posted, the Ford V-10 is about as reliable as you can get. One friend had 350K on his truck and another 495K on his. One was totaled thus ending it's career, the other one got a new engine.

Cylinder spark coils were common occurrences and water pump was the next. A serpentine belt is good to have and get those hoses checked and replaced. Yes, it can be costly however on the road you will pay 3x as much.

Regularly scheduled maintenance using quality parts and lubricants is the best extended warranty you could ever invest in.

After EVERY trip, I get my creeper out and take a slide under my rig with a flashlight. Loose wires and broken zip ties are common.

Become friends with a mobile RV mechanic. They usually charge much less that a brick and mortar repair shop and they come to you.

My dad's cars could make it to 100K and after that they struggled, those engines are long gone. Today's engines are so much better.

T18skyguy

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Posted: 01/30/20 07:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When I was in engine school, about when electricity was introduced, we we're taught that engine wear is most proportional to the amount of fuel that's put through it. The number of miles is a very loose metric. Plus throw in the number of cold starts. All things being equal, a V10 in a motor home will probably have more wear on it at 100,000 than a pickup truck, just by virtue of the fact that the motorhome uses more fuel. Then if it sits too much, all bets are off and anything can happen.


Retired Anesthetist. LTP. Pilot with mechanic/inspection ratings. 2017 Jayco Greyhawk 31FS. Wife and daughter. Three cats which we must obey.

valhalla360

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Posted: 01/31/20 11:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

T18skyguy wrote:

When I was in engine school, about when electricity was introduced, we we're taught that engine wear is most proportional to the amount of fuel that's put through it. The number of miles is a very loose metric. Plus throw in the number of cold starts. All things being equal, a V10 in a motor home will probably have more wear on it at 100,000 than a pickup truck, just by virtue of the fact that the motorhome uses more fuel. Then if it sits too much, all bets are off and anything can happen.


Problem with this theory is even most passenger cars go to the junkyard with functional engines in the modern world.

It's other things failing and then it's not worth fixing...if you have a 20yr old car that needs $2k in suspension work, you are usually better to put that $2k towards a newer used car...same thing with RVs.

It is very much the oddity to "wear out" an engine, so it really isn't a consideration.


Tammy & Mike
Ford F250 V10
2008 Copper Canyon 5er
Catalac Catamaran 34'
Full Time spliting time between boat and 5er


suprz

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Posted: 02/01/20 06:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The part about low mileage on older model RV's is correct. Bought my 2006 with only 18,000 miles on it in 2015. Now...that being said... it now has 43,000 miles on it


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ron.dittmer

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Posted: 02/01/20 06:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

T18skyguy wrote:

When I was in engine school, about when electricity was introduced, we we're taught that engine wear is most proportional to the amount of fuel that's put through it. The number of miles is a very loose metric. Plus throw in the number of cold starts. All things being equal, a V10 in a motor home will probably have more wear on it at 100,000 than a pickup truck, just by virtue of the fact that the motorhome uses more fuel. Then if it sits too much, all bets are off and anything can happen.
Problem with this theory is even most passenger cars go to the junkyard with functional engines in the modern world.

It's other things failing and then it's not worth fixing...if you have a 20yr old car that needs $2k in suspension work, you are usually better to put that $2k towards a newer used car...same thing with RVs.

It is very much the oddity to "wear out" an engine, so it really isn't a consideration.
I agree. If reasonably taken care of with oil changes at proper intervals along with maintaining the oil level, the basic engine is the last thing to "wear" out. It's everything around it that goes first, and corrosion (rust) accelerates the life of most everything else.

The only exception to my comment would be a neglected cooling system failure. Running an over-heated engine for too long of a time will fail at any age with any mileage.


2007 Phoenix Cruiser model 2350, with 2006 Jeep Liberty in-tow


pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 02/01/20 10:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

valhalla360 wrote:

T18skyguy wrote:

When I was in engine school, about when electricity was introduced, we we're taught that engine wear is most proportional to the amount of fuel that's put through it. The number of miles is a very loose metric. Plus throw in the number of cold starts. All things being equal, a V10 in a motor home will probably have more wear on it at 100,000 than a pickup truck, just by virtue of the fact that the motorhome uses more fuel. Then if it sits too much, all bets are off and anything can happen.


Problem with this theory is even most passenger cars go to the junkyard with functional engines in the modern world.

It's other things failing and then it's not worth fixing...if you have a 20yr old car that needs $2k in suspension work, you are usually better to put that $2k towards a newer used car...same thing with RVs.

It is very much the oddity to "wear out" an engine, so it really isn't a consideration.


Apparently ... some vehicle manufacturers take pride in it not being acceptable for certain parts of their vehicles to ever fail: A few weeks ago the transmission in our 18 year old Lexus sedan - with over 195,000 miles on it - failed completely. The Lexus dealer installed a remanufactured transmission in it for FREE after getting approval from Lexus headquarters. That's "free" as in no charge for the transmission and no charge for the labor -> an over $3600 Christmas gift!

I had a college professor who maintained that "the least expensive way to own a vehicle" is to maintain it, and keep it, and use it - as long as possible. IMHO, a complex and expensive piece of equipment such as a personal transportation or recreational vehicle should not be considered as a "disposable item" (... other than we need to soon come up with vehicles that don't destroy the Earth's atmosphere ... and therefore replace a bunch of vehicles on a world scale).

* This post was edited 02/01/20 11:16am by pnichols *

valhalla360

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Posted: 02/01/20 10:29pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:


I had a college professor who maintained that "the least expensive way to own a vehicle" is to maintain it, and keep it, and use it - as long as possible. IMHO, a complex and expensive piece of equipment such as a personal transportation or recreational vehicle should not be considered as a "disposable item" (... other than we need to soon come up with vehicles that don't destroy the Earth's atmosphere ... and therefore replace a bunch of vehicles on a world scale).


If you are buying new or nearly new...there is a lot of truth to your statement. This is also why buying used is usually far cheaper than buying new.

But as you near the end of a vehicles functional lifespan, there comes a point where you could buy a newer better condition vehicle for less than it costs to maintain the old one.

The only exception would be if you are into classic cars or there is some sentimental value...but now financial logic goes out the window.

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