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Open Roads Forum  >  General RVing Issues

 > Hand-powered chainsaw -- for emergency use

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badsix

north bend or.

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Posted: 03/22/20 10:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Bumpyroad wrote:

drsteve wrote:

pnichols wrote:

I once tried an electric chain saw but found it to be useless because of it's lack of power as compared to gas chain saws.



How long ago was that? I have an electric pruning saw on a pole with an 8 inch bar, the thing cuts fast and effortlessly.


me too
bumpy

my boy just bought a Ryobi battery powered chain saw it cuts better than a small gas saw and runs for hours. and NO PROBLEMS STARTING IT.. i'd like to watch the o/p cut a dry 6-8" log into with the chain. i'd be sure and have my cell with me ready to call 911. why not just a good sharp ax or hatchet.
Jay D.

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Posted: 03/22/20 10:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There are a plethora of very capable cordless chainsaws out now. For sure.
But they have their place, and "cuts better than a small gas saw" is very subjective and sounds like a pride of ownership thing.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

Bumpyroad

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Posted: 03/22/20 04:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

just saw a trimmer at sam's club that said could reach up to 15?? ft. didn't pay any real attention to it however.
bumpy





profdant139

Southern California

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Posted: 03/22/20 09:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Jay D, as the OP I am more likely to have the hatchet bounce off and hit me in some tender place --at least with the manual chainsaw, my biggest potential injury is nicks and abrasions.

Of course, if I end up with (heaven forbid) a heart attack from over-exertion, that ain't good. [emoticon]

Thank goodness, I am in pretty good aerobic condition this week -- all this "self-isolation" means I have a lot of time to exercise and to lift weights in my garage.

But we're all just having fun here, waiting to go camping again.


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pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 03/23/20 08:05pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

drsteve wrote:

pnichols wrote:

I once tried an electric chain saw but found it to be useless because of it's lack of power as compared to gas chain saws.



How long ago was that? I have an electric pruning saw on a pole with an 8 inch bar, the thing cuts fast and effortlessly.


I suspect that an electric pruning saw purpose-buillt to deal mostly with only 2-4 inch limbs takes considerably less torque than what I use my 16 inch gas chain saw for - tree limbs and tree trunks up to around 14 inches in diameter (... or larger if I circle around the trunk with the saw).

The electric chain saw that I gave up on was 120V AC powered via an extension cord ... probably way more capable, torque-wise, than any lithium battery powered chain saw. The electric chain saw I tried could in no way deal with tree limbs and tree trunks up to 14 inches in diameter.


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wnjj

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Posted: 03/23/20 10:28pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

drsteve wrote:

pnichols wrote:

I once tried an electric chain saw but found it to be useless because of it's lack of power as compared to gas chain saws.



How long ago was that? I have an electric pruning saw on a pole with an 8 inch bar, the thing cuts fast and effortlessly.


I suspect that an electric pruning saw purpose-buillt to deal mostly with only 2-4 inch limbs takes considerably less torque than what I use my 16 inch gas chain saw for - tree limbs and tree trunks up to around 14 inches in diameter (... or larger if I circle around the trunk with the saw).

The electric chain saw that I gave up on was 120V AC powered via an extension cord ... probably way more capable, torque-wise, than any lithium battery powered chain saw. The electric chain saw I tried could in no way deal with tree limbs and tree trunks up to 14 inches in diameter.

You must have had a turd of an electric saw. I have a 16” Stihl and 16” electric. Last year for the first time I used the electric to buck up a bunch of fir firewood logs well over 12” in diameter. The electric was darn close to the Stihl and much easier (lighter) to handle.

time2roll

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Posted: 03/23/20 10:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

How well the chain is resharpened can make any saw a dud or a hero.
They all work wonders when new.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 03/23/20 11:36pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^Ya, cutting with a dull or messed up chain is like tryin to eat steak with yer dentures out!

Equally as important is keeping the rakers filed down so the teeth have some bite and most important is throwing the pos safety chain a lot of saws come with in the garbage. Or at least grinding em down so they don't turn the chain into a sawdust factory.

Better yet, skip tooth chains, while they wear quicker than a full comp chain, are easier for the saw to pull and IMO can cut just as fast under most normal situations. Bonus is they're so easy to sharpen with only half as many teeth.

Anyone who owns a saw owes it to themselves to learn how to use a file. Something as simple as keeping a chain tuned up makes cutting so much easier when your chain is always sharp.

drsteve

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Posted: 03/24/20 05:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

drsteve wrote:

pnichols wrote:

I once tried an electric chain saw but found it to be useless because of it's lack of power as compared to gas chain saws.



How long ago was that? I have an electric pruning saw on a pole with an 8 inch bar, the thing cuts fast and effortlessly.


I suspect that an electric pruning saw purpose-buillt to deal mostly with only 2-4 inch limbs takes considerably less torque than what I use my 16 inch gas chain saw for - tree limbs and tree trunks up to around 14 inches in diameter (... or larger if I circle around the trunk with the saw).

The electric chain saw that I gave up on was 120V AC powered via an extension cord ... probably way more capable, torque-wise, than any lithium battery powered chain saw. The electric chain saw I tried could in no way deal with tree limbs and tree trunks up to 14 inches in diameter.


Actually it deals with limbs up to nearly the bar length very well. Those plug-in models are old tech.
My next saw is going to be electric with a 14 or 16 inch bar.


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pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 03/27/20 10:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Well, plug-in models may be "old tech" ... but lithium batteries heat up, run down, and they lose capacity with age ... so they must be periodically $$$$ replaced (if you can afford them at the time or find the right size/type available easily when you want to replace them).

Last year I bought a $$$ state-of-the-art lithium powered Makita weed trimmer. The batteries (it takes 2 batteries) would last about an hour of hard tall-grass use (not too bad, I thought).

HOWEVER ... the trimmer would only run about one-half hour before protection circuitry stopped it ... for me to then wait for the batteries themselves (not the trimmer motor) to COOL DOWN. After 15-20 minutes of battery cool down, I could then proceed to trim for the last one-half hour of battery energy.

IMHO, lithium powered tools are not quite ready for serious usage on acerage. Gas powered (or electric plug-in with a generator) tools are still the name of the game for doing hard work for hours.

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