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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > New Truck - Is My Math Right?

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sliptap

Indiana

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Posted: 03/19/20 08:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Everyone - thank you again for the great feedback! This has given me some great perspective as I continue my research. Understood on the points around water and weight hitch distribution, which is good to know.

I think I have what I need now and have learned more in the past month about towing than I ever imagined. Wish you all safe travels [emoticon]

hussbuss

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Posted: 03/20/20 07:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Get yourself a Sureline tongue scale. about $125.00 on E bay. Take the scale and some blocking along to look at trailers. Set the scale under the hitch and weigh it at the dealer. Then you can add for LP gas battery etc. Keep looking until you find one that will work. I use my scale all year long to check on the weight. We also use it on our race car trailers an for $10.00 and a beer or 2 we weigh other race rigs. Have fun and welcome to the forum.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 03/21/20 10:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

hussbuss wrote:

Get yourself a Sureline tongue scale. about $125.00 on E bay. Take the scale and some blocking along to look at trailers. Set the scale under the hitch and weigh it at the dealer. Then you can add for LP gas battery etc. Keep looking until you find one that will work. I use my scale all year long to check on the weight. We also use it on our race car trailers an for $10.00 and a beer or 2 we weigh other race rigs. Have fun and welcome to the forum.


hussbuss, that is a real scary way of deciding what trailer to buy, it does not give you the complete picture of the trailer..

The problem with this is you will not get the ENTIRE "dry weight" of the trailer, you are only measuring the weight of the tongue as it sits on the dealer lot. Additionally the dealer lot most likely will not be level which will also affect the tongue weight.

You really do not care what the dry weight is, go with the GVWR of the trailer, calculate 10% through 15% of the GVWR as the tongue weight and go from there. This way you are no longer GUESSING as to the weight of the trailer or tongue will end up being.

You seasoned dry weight folks love to make this a more convoluted and confusing way of figuring out what you can tow because you want to "maximize" and "justify" the largest and heaviest trailer you can possibly drag with you..

For a newby to towing, dry weight is a sure way to end up with more trailer than the tow vehicle will be able to handle when fully outfitted with gear and ready for camping.

As far as buying a $125 scale, yeah, you could do that, however you don't need pinpoint accuracy and even these dedicated tongue scales have accuracy problems (they MUST be sitting flat and level and still can vary a lot in readings).

You CAN use your bathroom scales with a 4ft long 4x4 and some blocking.. Pretty much EVERYONE has some bathroom scales which could be used. Although I have not tried digital scales, they might work as long as you can lower the tongue fast enough without dropping the tongue to get the reading.

Read HERE for a real good write up WITH photos to show you how it is done.

Even old fashioned mechanical scales cost only $12 HERE and a 6ft 4x4 might run you $20, it does work and anyone can do it. So for less than $40 you have a multi use scale with enough accuracy for what you need.

GrandpaKip

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Posted: 03/22/20 08:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^This.
Using the gross weight rating of the camper will get you started at the heaviest the trailer should be.
Then figure the % (you pick between 10 and 15). You cannot have any real kind of accuracy using dry weight as a reference.


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Grit dog

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Posted: 03/22/20 10:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lots of deleted posts here recently...mine anyway, lol.
You guys can't even agree how to weigh a trailer now.
For crying out loud. New half ton is a new half ton, basically. If you're generally within the towing weight, you'd have to get pretty egregious with loading the truck and trailer to have an issue.
And trucks have built in "scales". They're called springs. If you're squishing the springs flat, you need to make some changes.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

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Posted: 03/27/20 03:25pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a F-150 also but have the STX HD tow pkg with the 3.5 Eco Boost. I have an equalizing hitch and have added Sumo springs, Sway Bars and HD KYB shocks to the rear. Towing my 31' #7200 TT is easy and drama free. Be sure to get the lightest trailer that fits you and equip things with a good hitch and you should be ok.

Lwiddis

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Posted: 03/27/20 03:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

“Be sure to get the lightest trailer that fits you and equip things with a good hitch and you should be ok.“

A good hitch is necessary, yes, but it isn’t the only item needed for being “ok.” No substitutes for adequate factory payload and weight pulling ability.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, 300 watts solar-parallel & MPPT, Trojan T-125s. TALL pole for flags. Prefer USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, USF&WS, state & county camps. Bicyclist! 14 year Army vet - 11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560)


Huntindog

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Posted: 03/28/20 03:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

“Be sure to get the lightest trailer that fits you and equip things with a good hitch and you should be ok.“


This statement should come with the following caveat: Low weight generally means a less durable unit.
Thought it is possible for a builder to use expensive materials to make a unit hold up, few will pay the price that would be required.

Most affordable quality units are heaver than their competition. Heavy axles, frames and other componenets add weight. There really is no way around it without breaking the bank.

A lightweight unit that doesn't hold up can be far more expensive than a heavy unit towed with a stout truck.

One way or another, you will pay.



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TomG2

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Posted: 03/28/20 04:36am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Huntindog wrote:

Quote:


Most affordable quality units are heaver than their competition. Heavy axles, frames and other componenets add weight. There really is no way around it without breaking the bank.

A lightweight unit that doesn't hold up can be far more expensive than a heavy unit towed with a stout truck.

One way or another, you will pay.[/COLOR]


Equating more weight with more quality is a bogus assumption. Cheap shoddy heavy parts and components are available to the builders. In fact, some great engineering examples of lighter and better are out there. Casitas and Airstreams come to mind. Anyone can build heavy, no trick to that.

Grit dog

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Posted: 03/28/20 12:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

It’s a wonder some of you who are responding actually have a RV and camp!
The way you make it sound, it appears that your opinion of owning and using a TT is more complicated than a bio-physics thesis and the operation of it is like trying to keep a neglected jalopy on the road.
It’s not rocket science and it’s not the maintenance nightmare some make it out to be.

Although the less mechanically inclined and the less prone a person is to general maint and upkeep, the more of a “hassle” it appears to be.

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