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Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire  >  General Topics

 > Protecting your trees

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south

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Posted: 05/22/20 01:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

So far in seven years we have lost five huge trees. I looked out the window from where I;m sitting and there is another about 80-90 ft tall healthy oak but it is leaning. Last week it was straight.
The reason....the people we bought this home from drove heavy equipment over some of the trees roots and then shoved dirt on top of the roots on one side or the other. Piling just four inches of dirt on top of a tree's roots like oaks can kill the roots. We had one tree upend with nothing but a few inches of root at the base in the ball.Our last home few =miles away in 2010 a huge walnut was hit by tornado winds that passed just feet from the house. It upended the tree but the roots one in particular was like a huge black fire hose of five inches or more in diameter and nearly reached our well house a distance of about 60 ft. The tree was not broken anywhere. There is about a thousand dollars in wood in this tree but no way to get it out without tearing up the ground. Oak and walnut and others is expensive these days. The last tree that went down had 3 10' by about 40" through the middle with no limbs sections or red oak. at the mill each log probably brought 2500.00. The walnut that came down is several peoples mantles and tables. I have another downed walnut in the woods but even if i could get to it I am disabled so much as to not be able to deal with it. It is abut 100 ft including the crown an perhaps 40' through the middle at chest height. Would make some beautiful tables and such. I need some benches around the place too.

Guy Roan

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Posted: 05/23/20 07:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Up in the NC Mountains, none of the mills want red or white oak. The big demand is for Poplar, which is used for furniture frames
I heat with wood, and my first choice is Locust The second is white oak and the third is red oak, but all three need at least three years to season after they are split.
One by one all of our big three foot diameter, 100 foot tall Hemlocks have been dying from the "Wooly Adelgid" so I have been using that mixed with Oak or Locust. The hemlock seasons in a year and burns hot, but quick.
Locust used to be the wood of choice for bridges and bridge abutments, but my first bridge that got wiped out in a "thousand year flood" had to replaced with White oak planks since no saw mills cut Locust any more.

Guy

narcodog

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Posted: 05/23/20 08:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Guy Roan wrote:

Up in the NC Mountains, none of the mills want red or white oak. The big demand is for Poplar, which is used for furniture frames
I heat with wood, and my first choice is Locust The second is white oak and the third is red oak, but all three need at least three years to season after they are split.
One by one all of our big three foot diameter, 100 foot tall Hemlocks have been dying from the "Wooly Adelgid" so I have been using that mixed with Oak or Locust. The hemlock seasons in a year and burns hot, but quick.
Locust used to be the wood of choice for bridges and bridge abutments, but my first bridge that got wiped out in a "thousand year flood" had to replaced with White oak planks since no saw mills cut Locust any more

Guy



You do know you can treat the hemlocks?

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 05/23/20 09:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The real answer to your post title is "you can't protect the trees".

It IS natural for trees to die, fail or fall over eventually.

80-90ft Oak has to be pretty old, it will have a large canopy making it very top heavy and prone to winds pushing it around, it is also pretty tall making it a pretty efficient "lever" torquing on the root system.

Your Oak obviously was not as "healthy" as you though, pretty hard to determine "health" of a tree just by looks.. Even so, even healthy trees can lean, especially if you have had a lot of saturating heavy rains which turn the soil into mud.. Makes any tree vulnerable to winds toppling it over.

Huge trees are not always an "asset" they can turn into a liability in a blink of your eye.

Just be thankful that no one got hurt and nothing was damaged when they came down.

You might want to be a bit more proactive with any remaining old large trees that may be within distance of reaching out to your home, other outbuildings or harm yourself or others..

I have taken down quite a few "healthy" looking tall old trees around my property, a few of them have had internal rot..

Sometimes one must let go of the old and replace with new..

Guy Roan

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Posted: 05/24/20 05:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

narcodog wrote:

Guy Roan wrote:

Up in the NC Mountains, none of the mills want red or white oak. The big demand is for Poplar, which is used for furniture frames
I heat with wood, and my first choice is Locust The second is white oak and the third is red oak, but all three need at least three years to season after they are split.
One by one all of our big three foot diameter, 100 foot tall Hemlocks have been dying from the "Wooly Adelgid" so I have been using that mixed with Oak or Locust. The hemlock seasons in a year and burns hot, but quick.
Locust used to be the wood of choice for bridges and bridge abutments, but my first bridge that got wiped out in a "thousand year flood" had to replaced with White oak planks since no saw mills cut Locust any more

Guy



You do know you can treat the hemlocks?


Sure if you have a million bucks!
The National Forest Service basically gave up
Same with the national Park Service
Along the Blue Ridge Parkway they are all gone or are standing dead
I know all about treating them systemically and it is a losing cause
Guy

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

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Posted: 05/24/20 05:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

over the past few years we have watched all the ash die around us; some very large trees. There are now down logs and stands of dead trees; ash was up to 25% of the trees in the forests.

jetboater454

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Posted: 05/24/20 06:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I remember when the ash beetle was trying to be contained. Campgrounds banned any firewood being brought in. It slowed it,but it still killed off a lot of the trees.


2011 Toyota Tundra DC Long Bed
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narcodog

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Posted: 05/24/20 09:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Guy Roan wrote:

narcodog wrote:

Guy Roan wrote:

Up in the NC Mountains, none of the mills want red or white oak. The big demand is for Poplar, which is used for furniture frames
I heat with wood, and my first choice is Locust The second is white oak and the third is red oak, but all three need at least three years to season after they are split.
One by one all of our big three foot diameter, 100 foot tall Hemlocks have been dying from the "Wooly Adelgid" so I have been using that mixed with Oak or Locust. The hemlock seasons in a year and burns hot, but quick.
Locust used to be the wood of choice for bridges and bridge abutments, but my first bridge that got wiped out in a "thousand year flood" had to replaced with White oak planks since no saw mills cut Locust any more

Guy



You do know you can treat the hemlocks?


Sure if you have a million bucks!
The National Forest Service basically gave up
Same with the national Park Service
Along the Blue Ridge Parkway they are all gone or are standing dead
I know all about treating them systemically and it is a losing cause
Guy


Not entirely true. For the small lot owner there are products you can apply yourself. There are also grants from organizations that will help you out.

Gdetrailer

PA

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Posted: 05/24/20 03:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Fixed that for you..

Those "products" or rather say CHEMICALS have the potential down the road of causing other collateral damage to the environment. Great, we "saved" that tree, but so what if we poisoned the land at least we have that tree, oh wait, we can't eat the food grown from the Earth..

Chemicals while they can do vast amounts of good, wrongly used/applied or overused will over time cause issues or in many cases 10-20yrs down the road the ambulance chasing Lawyers will have commercials on TV about Cancer caused by product "X".

Trees ARE one of the most abundant "renewables" we have on this planet, they sprout, grow, filter the air, they eventually run out of life then fall over, decompose all to start the process over and over without HUMAN INTERVENTION.

If you do not believe me, try keeping an empty field from growing "volunteer" trees by simply not mowing it for a summer..

We HUMANS are sometimes the little "cog" in the wheel of life with good intentions causing more damage than good.

* This post was edited 05/24/20 07:39pm by an administrator/moderator *

narcodog

Georgia

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Posted: 05/25/20 04:43pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Tell me when was the last time you saw an American Chestnut?

* This post was edited 05/25/20 05:17pm by an administrator/moderator *

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