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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > Buying a TT

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2012Coleman

Florida

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Posted: 06/24/20 05:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GrandpaKip wrote:

Forget the dry weight. Not particularly accurate and not particularly useful. Ditto with the tow rating. It’s not useful for pulling a big box through the air.
Use the gross weight of the trailer. Take 13% of that for an idea of max tongue weight and add 100 pounds for a WDH.
Find the payload sticker on the driver’s door jamb.
Then do the math.
X2 - looked up the specs for your intended TT: UVW 5956 + CCC 1724 * .013 = a tongue weight of 960 lbs.

Sure, you may not load 1724 lbs of stuff, but if your calculating instead of getting actual weights, that's the way to go. So wack off 960 lbs of payload from the start. Add another 100 for the WDH, add the weight of the occupants of the cab, and then the stuff your most likely going to put in the bed. Does your hitch receiver have a rating sticker? Did you look at the sticker in the drivers side door jamb that says weight of cargo and passengers not to exceed xxxx lbs? What is that number?

Airbags don't increase payload,


Experience without good judgment is worthless; good judgment without experience is still good judgment!

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deltabravo

Spokane, WA

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Posted: 06/24/20 06:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CleverName wrote:

After doing a lot of research I'm looking into a Salem cruise lite 273qb. The dry weight claims to be 5950, and the overall length will be 33' with the tongue and everything.


That's still a lot longer than I'd feel comfortable towing with a short bed 1/2 ton truck


2009 Silverado 3500HD Dually, D/A, CCLB 4x4 (bought new 8/30/09)
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kfp673

PA

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Posted: 06/24/20 06:45am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CleverName wrote:

After doing a lot of research I'm looking into a Salem cruise lite 273qb. The dry weight claims to be 5950, and the overall length will be 33' with the tongue and everything. My tow rating is 9100lbs. I'm going to spend the money on a good brake controller and WDH with sway control. It feels less risky to me especially with the dry weight being under 6k. What do you all think?


We had a similar setup for a few years but with a Yukon. The Yukon had the auto air leveling which made it a lot easier to level. You can certainly do it just take your time and know it's going to get a bit "loose" behind you. Invest in a really good hitch. I'm a BlueOx sway pro fan myself but there are plenty of good ones. I upgraded to a 3/4 ton truck and it is a massive difference. Trying to paint a realistic picture for you rather than scare you or say just go for it. We did many trips this way, always got there safe, but definitly have more grey hair and drank more beer once getting there because of it. Especially on highways when you get pushed around. Back roads were really no problem. Give it a try. Your first year of use will tell you if a new truck is in your future or not ;-)

APT

SE Michigan

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Posted: 06/24/20 11:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

That sounds like a good combo to me! I towed my 28' box, 32'+another 2' when rear rack extended with a 2003 F-150 Supercrew. Stability was great when I properly adjusted my WDH. Now I have a 3/4 ton with more payload, but shorter wheelbase by 8". Same stability.


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patperry2766

Saginaw Texas

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Posted: 06/24/20 12:00pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What are the age of the kids?

Flagstaff Hybrid

Could something like this be an option? With 3 beds, plus a fold down dinette and couch, there should be ample sleeping arrangements. If the kids are small enough now, could they double up in one of the fold out beds and put a DMZ line between them if they squabble?

It would put you closer to an ideal weight, and since the beds fold out, you will have a lot of interior space.

* This post was edited 06/24/20 12:12pm by patperry2766 *


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CleverName

Wilmington

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Posted: 06/24/20 12:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

13, 11, 11, 4

Jebby14

Windsor Ontario

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Posted: 06/25/20 05:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

what are the numbers on your trucks door sticker?

joedekock

West Michigan

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Posted: 06/25/20 09:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Do you have the 6 cylinder motor? I had a 2011 with that gearing and those were the same specs I had for towing. I traded up to a 2019 Silverado last year with the new 3.23 gear ratio and 5.3 V-8 and it has capabilities of 9600 pounds towing, 15,000 GVWR. That's the minimum specs. It only goes up from there. That's why I wonder if you have the V-6

LadyRVer wrote:

I have a 2019 Chev Silverado, same specs as your. Personally, I would not want to pull one of that size with my truck. Not saying it can't be done, but more to consider than just towing. I don't have a manual for mine, but the Chev service dept told me 7,500 max loaded to tow. I am towing about 5,000 with weight distribution/stabilizer. Enough for my truck. With your size family, weight adds up fast. I would like to put airbags on mine.



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joedekock

West Michigan

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Posted: 06/25/20 09:51am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I tow that now and its fine. Make sure you invest in the Equalizer 4 point (E4) hitch or the Hensley Arrow and you'll be fine. Ive towed on very windy days with no issues.

kfp673 wrote:

CleverName wrote:

After doing a lot of research I'm looking into a Salem cruise lite 273qb. The dry weight claims to be 5950, and the overall length will be 33' with the tongue and everything. My tow rating is 9100lbs. I'm going to spend the money on a good brake controller and WDH with sway control. It feels less risky to me especially with the dry weight being under 6k. What do you all think?


We had a similar setup for a few years but with a Yukon. The Yukon had the auto air leveling which made it a lot easier to level. You can certainly do it just take your time and know it's going to get a bit "loose" behind you. Invest in a really good hitch. I'm a BlueOx sway pro fan myself but there are plenty of good ones. I upgraded to a 3/4 ton truck and it is a massive difference. Trying to paint a realistic picture for you rather than scare you or say just go for it. We did many trips this way, always got there safe, but definitly have more grey hair and drank more beer once getting there because of it. Especially on highways when you get pushed around. Back roads were really no problem. Give it a try. Your first year of use will tell you if a new truck is in your future or not ;-)


joedekock

West Michigan

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Posted: 06/25/20 10:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I always highly recommend you do the math and then check it. First, know your truck. What motor and what rear gear ratio do you have? Once you know that go to the Trailer Life website and lookup your truck in the towing guides to get your max towing capacity. After figuring that out, find the sticker on your truck's door (usually drivers side on the side of the door as you open it or on the column the door closes to). That will tell you the vehicles curb weight and GVWR (gross vehicle weight rating). The GVWR is the total the truck can weigh (with people and gear included) with a trailer. Depending on options on the truck the truck's weight can vary.

I personally like to leave at minimum 10% overhead in my towing weight. My 2019 Silverado with the 5.3L V-8 and 3.23 rear gear ratio will tow 9600 pounds and a tongue weight of 950 pounds. That means I want to stay roughly 1,000 pounds lighter in my trailer. I figure that 10% makes up for the people and things I will have in the back of my truck.

For your trailer... there is a stick on the door, or somewhere on the outside of the trailer that will list the trailers dry (empty) weight. This is almost never accurate. Just like your truck it depends on the options you have in the trailer unless you want the base options. My new trailer I just picked up is a Coachmen 29se. The manufacturers website says its ~5700 pounds dry. The sticker on the door of the trailer says its 6040 pounds dry. Clearly something is off. I figure we have some extra options in our unit that adds to the weight.

The first thing I did when I picked up the trailer with my wife is take our empty truck (just me and the wife) and the trailer hooked to the truck to truck weighing scale. I was shocked that it came to 12,40 pounds. The truck sticker says its 5,300 pounds and the trailers sticker says its 6,040 pounds. So that's about 800 pounds more than I expected. Now I weigh 180 pounds and my wife weighs 140. So it doesn't make sense. however, I am still within my total GVWR for the truck. (15,000 pounds).

I invested this time in the Equalizer E4, 4 point hitch. Wow, what a difference. Its like the trailer isn't even behind my truck, and I get no bouncing anymore on the road. We pulled it home with high winds and it was

I figure we usually have roughly 1,000 pounds of "stuff" when we load up our trailer and the truck bed with bikes for the family camping trips. But, I will be going back to the scale to weigh that in a week when we leave for our 8 day trip with all the gear.

In closing... do the math, know what numbers you're using for the math, get the truck's data, the trailer's data, and get your rig weighed at a scale. Its worth knowing the data. And for the love of all things right... get a good hitch. The biggest problem I see is people cheapening out on their hitch system. Easily more than half the trailers I see on the road being hauled are not distributing weight properly, no sway control, and they are bouncing and swaying all over the road. Also, that causes vehicle wear and tear much quicker.

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