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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  Modifications and Accessories

 > Switching from 12 volt to 6 volt batteries

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ajriding

st clair

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Posted: 07/13/20 06:58pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GravelRider wrote:

ajriding wrote:

No, no, no... This Furrion given in links above is not a Danfoss-style compressor, it is not efficient. It draws 15 amps...

I have one of these ICECO Compressor Fridgehttps://www.wayfair.com/appliances/pdp/iceco-211-cuft-frost-free-chest-freezer-ieco1002.html .


The one you link is a 2 C.F. that is listed at 7.5 amps. The Furrion is 10 C.F. and is listed at 15 amps. I'd assume a larger fridge would use a larger compressor, and thus more amps. I'm not an e...r.


No, maybe that particular seller has wrong info. The Iceco is a danfoss or danfoss style and draws super low amps, 3-5. It is the same as the Engle, ARB or Dometic as far as power goes. 5 or less amps is very low draw and will not drain batts in a day.

I was camping 4 days and parked in the forest under tall trees in NC for 3 days and it rained every afternoon. The batts never went lower than 12.3 over night. In the shade they never got to full charge either, but the fridge ran the whole time (I mean was keeping things cold/frozen) and worked like a champ. I would leave all day and close the roof vents but leave windows cracked because it rains, and it was hot in camper during the day too. Windows are frameless so can be left open.

Anyway, people who do not have these type fridges are chiming in so much, too much. They are great, use low power and I do not know anyone who is not happy with them.
This Iceco is a bit of an off brand for Yanks, but ARB, Engle (spell?) and Dometic are the big 3. I also have an ARB single compartment unit that works great, but I needed a freezer and a fridge, so upgraded.
I chose Iceco for the price and that I can control both compartments separately. I can turn one on, one off, have both as fridges, both as freezers or one of each, and set temps independently...

GravelRider

Pennsylvania

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Joined: 05/13/2020

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Posted: 07/13/20 07:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I installed the battery monitor today, so I'll be able to get a much better picture of how much battery I'm using and how much each item is drawing.

[image]

GravelRider

Pennsylvania

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Posted: 07/13/20 07:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ajriding wrote:

GravelRider wrote:

ajriding wrote:

No, no, no... This Furrion given in links above is not a Danfoss-style compressor, it is not efficient. It draws 15 amps...

I have one of these ICECO Compressor Fridgehttps://www.wayfair.com/appliances/pdp/iceco-211-cuft-frost-free-chest-freezer-ieco1002.html .


The one you link is a 2 C.F. that is listed at 7.5 amps. The Furrion is 10 C.F. and is listed at 15 amps. I'd assume a larger fridge would use a larger compressor, and thus more amps. I'm not an e...r.


No, maybe that particular seller has wrong info. The Iceco is a danfoss or danfoss style and draws super low amps, 3-5. It is the same as the Engle, ARB or Dometic as far as power goes. 5 or less amps is very low draw and will not drain batts in a day.

I was camping 4 days and parked in the forest under tall trees in NC for 3 days and it rained every afternoon. The batts never went lower than 12.3 over night. In the shade they never got to full charge either, but the fridge ran the whole time (I mean was keeping things cold/frozen) and worked like a champ. I would leave all day and close the roof vents but leave windows cracked because it rains, and it was hot in camper during the day too. Windows are frameless so can be left open.

Anyway, people who do not have these type fridges are chiming in so much, too much. They are great, use low power and I do not know anyone who is not happy with them.
This Iceco is a bit of an off brand for Yanks, but ARB, Engle (spell?) and Dometic are the big 3. I also have an ARB single compartment unit that works great, but I needed a freezer and a fridge, so upgraded.
I chose Iceco for the price and that I can control both compartments separately. I can turn one on, one off, have both as fridges, both as freezers or one of each, and set temps independently...


Now that I installed the battery monitor, I checked the actual draw from the fridge, and it drew 10 amps on startup for just a few seconds, and then settled around 7.5 amps. I'm wondering if the numbers listed are just the maximum possible draw.

crosscheck

Coldstream, BC

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Posted: 07/13/20 09:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

bpounds wrote:

I have agree with Vintage465. My propane ain't broke, and it don't need fixing. It is perfect for boondocking.

I get it though. Absorption fridges are kind of a pain at times, for some people, and the urge to go with a residential fridge is strong. All kinds of ways of justifying a residential unit in an RV have been posted. Now that solar and lots of battery are all the rage, some have lost interest in efficient off-grid practices. Just throw juice at whatever inconvenience comes along. Okay as long as the weather stays clear and sunny.

Whether it runs through an inverter, or directly on 12v battery, a residential fridge is what it is.

We are out camping without internet in the southern Canadian Rockies. Made it to town and have a few comments on your post.
1) Residential fridges and what the OP is talking about are quite different.
2) We have the option of having propane or all electric 12 v fridges in our RV's when camping. You choose to ignore the positives of all electric fridges even though many including myself have successfully dry camped for 5 years with one and you have never had any experience except for the fact that you have enjoyed residential fridges at home for the last many, many years.
3)Because 12 v fridges are your biggest draw of electricity from your batteries, you just naturally look for ways to conserve when boondocking.
4) Solar and batteries are the rage because they work.I am on a 2 month staycation dry camping in BC and in the end, no Genny or shore power, all because of solar/ batteries.

Dave


2016 F350 Diesel 4X4 CC SRW SB,
2016 Creekside 23RKS, 490W solar, 2000W Xantrex Freedom 2012 inverter, 4 6V GC-2 (450AH)
2006 F350 CC 4X4 sold
2011 Outfitter 9.5' sold
Some Of Our Fun:http://daveincoldstream.blogspot.ca/

GrederFagot

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Posted: 03/12/21 08:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

i

GrederFagot

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Posted: 03/12/21 08:03am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

Here is some more detailed information on SiO2 batteries:

***Link Removed***


I just switched over to (2) 6 volt batteries for my trailer from original 12 volt that cam with it. They are correctly wired in a series to supply 12 volts to the trailer. Question is, Do I need to install thicker gauge ground and positive wires to the trailer? When I purchased the batteries, they gave my a thicker jumper than the original ones.

Boon Docker

Mountain Foothills of Southern Alberta

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Posted: 03/12/21 10:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The original trailer wires will be just fine with the new batteries.

Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Posted: 03/13/21 04:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

GravelRider wrote:

I installed the battery monitor today, so I'll be able to get a much better picture of how much battery I'm using and how much each item is drawing.

[image]
I have a 18 CF propane fridge that works great.
Are there any comparable 12V fridges? If so, how much power do they use?



Huntindog
100% boondocking
2021 Grand Design Momentum 398M
2 bathrooms, no waiting
104 gal grey, 104 black,158 fresh
Full Body Paint, 3, 8K axles, Disc Brakes
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540 watts solar,
2020 Silverado High Country CC DA 4X4 Big Dually.



Huntindog

Phoenix AZ

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Posted: 03/13/21 04:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CavemanCharlie wrote:

Vintage465 wrote:

crosscheck wrote:

Vintage465 wrote:

crosscheck wrote:

bpounds wrote:

Couple things to add,

That 12v fridge is bad news for boondocking. They are very inefficient. Normally only find those in popup style rigs. But, I guess you're stuck with it. Get more battery.

I like the Vmax line of 6vdc. And with those AGM, you do not need to put them in a battery box. They are safe in any orientation. That might allow you to get even more than 2 of them, but you do need pairs. Unless you look at the Vmax 12vdc AGM. I don't have the 12v, but I would trust the name.

The cheap club store batteries will need to be in a box, and you'll likely end up replacing them sooner. Depending on how you maintain them. Might or might not be worth the savings to you.


One of the main reasons I chose a Danfos compressor style 12V fridge /freezer was because the they are a favourite of the ultimate boondockers which are yachters. They can't use propane fridges because propane is heavier than air and could sink to the lower decks if there was a leak and could cause an explosion.
Our camping style is 98% dry/boondock camping. For 5 years, we camped with a 7.5cuft NovaKool fridge/freezer which when cycling used 4.4A. They are more efficient than absorption fridges using 1/3 less energy. They cool much quicker, for the same outer dimensions, have 1/3 more volume, keep more consistant temperatures in hot ambient temperatures and are not a fire hazard. We almost never needed our 2000W genny as we had 4 6V AGM batteries and lots of solar.

People who use the term"12V fridges are bad news for boondocking" have never had this kind of fridge. They are becoming much more popular for so many reasons as long as you figure in more electrical capacity(batteries, solar) if you don't want to run your genny.

I have a 6 cuft absorption fridge in my TT which came with the new unit. If it gives up the ghost down the line, a 9 cuft NovaKool will fit exactly in the same opening and as I already have plenty of solar and 4 6V GC-2 batteries and more room for extra solar, this is the route I will go.

Dave


That does sound like an efficient 12v fridge. My concern as a boon docker is I hate.........did I say hate?.... Generators. I'll do most anything not to use a generator. And I like camping year round. That include weather that gets down in the teens. I'd need enough battery to run my furnace to heat the the belly of the coach to keep the tanks warm enough. I can keep up with my furnace pretty easily with my solar, but I think if you tagged another fairly high draw unit on the 4-6v's it'd get critical. Bottom line is you really have to prioritize your usage choice. I want a furnace, a C-pap, no genny and winter. Prolly nixes the 12v fridge...for my boon docking needs.


Howdy, to another Creekside owner. Another neat plus for compressor fridges is that they can be operational without problems out of level for long periods of time.( Again, think of yachts).
No question, the NovaKool was the largest single draw of battery power bar none.So if you had to choose, get rid of the OEM heater fan and put in a Cat heater. I have no experience with these but some say they work well.
My absorption fridge works fine but I would replace it in a heart beat if it quit.

Dave

Problem with the CAT heater will not heat the belly in real cold weather. I personally am big fan of propane fridges. I don't see any reason to use anything different. I've also found, as I get older, that there are an alarming number of people that really don't care what my opinion is! Everyone will use what they need that fits their use needs.


Sorry to jump in on the middle of your conversation. Could a person use a CAT heater and a 12 volt fan to push heat into the underbelly ? I've often wonder d about this.

I too love my propane fridge that I have in my 1993 Travel Trailer and I have no problems with it cooling.

My brother has a 2018 5th wheel and the propane fridge that he has will not keep food cool when he is traveling down the road, or in days when the outside heat is high. I think the newer ones are not built as well and are giving the whole industry a bad reputation.
Probably with some creative modding it could be made to work... BUT it probably would be a waste of time. The reason for a CAT heater is to eliminate the draw from the fan. Installing a fan that would move enough air to make a difference would put you back where you started from.

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 03/13/21 10:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Huntindog wrote:

Probably with some creative modding it could be made to work... BUT it probably would be a waste of time. The reason for a CAT heater is to eliminate the draw from the fan. Installing a fan that would move enough air to make a difference would put you back where you started from.


My twindow fans draw a scant 27 watts and solved water line freeze ups. I used them to replace the return air grill for the furnace. I operate them using a mechanical thermostat kept near the water pump.

I won't use a non vented combustion heater, nor a generator when I plan to be sleeping.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, soon to have SiO2 batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

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