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Open Roads Forum  >  Class A Motorhomes  >  Projects & Upgrades

 > Installing an inverter in my Winndbago Journey

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tropical36

Southwest Florida_USA

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Posted: 09/13/20 06:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

warrenjo46 wrote:

EV2 wrote:

One consideration when plugging the shore power cord into the inverter is to turn off the 110 breaker for the converter/charger. If this is not done, the converter will attempt to charge the batteries that supply the inverter. This loop will either use excessive energy at a minimum or trip the inverter. We have labeled our 110 breakers for the converter charger and air conditioning and turn them off whenever plugging into the inverter. Works perfectly. Also may wish to avoid using the microwave.
(Highly recommend a pure sine wave inverter when doing this.)

Yes I did purchase a pure sine wave inverter (2500W).

I will install a normally closed relay in the power to the converter that will be energized to open when the inverter is turned on. That will prevent the converter from trying to charge the batteries with power drawn from the batteries.

My only problem with this plan is "where is the converter?"

After looking at several wiring diagrams and schematics I discovered that the converter is located under the refrigerator behind the grill that looks like the cold air return for the furnace. Since motorhomes are very compact manufacturers need to tuck devices into unexpected places.

With most of the newer coaches and not so new, the converter and inverter are compacted into one unit and usually in an outside bay near the batteries.


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pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

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Posted: 09/13/20 07:51pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

consider that when using the inverter you wish to save as much power as possible. Having it power a relay may use about 12 watts.

If, on the other hand, you have shore power pull the relay closed, you save that 12 watts, when on the inverter. On shore power 12 watts is nothing. On battery power it is a lot.


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, soon to have SiO2 batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

newizu

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Posted: 10/22/20 02:30pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This question is for Tropical36. I am interested in doing what you described you have done to connect inverter as shore power. Would it help if I were to disconnect power bank from main setup and use it as a stand-alone power bank to power the inverter?

tropical36

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Posted: 10/22/20 09:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

newizu wrote:

This question is for Tropical36. I am interested in doing what you described you have done to connect inverter as shore power. Would it help if I were to disconnect power bank from main setup and use it as a stand-alone power bank to power the inverter?

Not really understanding the question here.
What are you referring to as the ....power bank... and are you perhaps talking about your house batteries?
What do you mean by the main setup?
All I was saying is that you might just plug your shore power cord into the inverter's 120vac output when you want to use it. Again, you must first open every non essential circuit breaker, when doing so or risk depleting your house batteries in short order. As for what you can keep, it will depend on the size of the inverter.
If you only want to operate a couple of things and the inverter is only 1000watts or less, it's not all that hard to run a couple of dedicated outlets here and there, like I did in our old gas coach and be done with it, as another option.

time2roll

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Posted: 10/22/20 09:35pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

newizu wrote:

This question is for Tropical36. I am interested in doing what you described you have done to connect inverter as shore power. Would it help if I were to disconnect power bank from main setup and use it as a stand-alone power bank to power the inverter?
Yes and no.

I assume you mean battery bank when you say "power bank"

Yes if you had a separate battery dedicated to the inverter you would not have to worry about the converter creating a power loop that drains the single battery.

No it may not save you much because the inverter powering the converter would still be charging the existing house battery potentially using a lot of power. Then you still need a way to charge the second battery dedicated to the inverter.

In the end I don't think this simplifies things. I don't recommend it.


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pianotuna

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Posted: 10/22/20 10:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

newizu,


Here is one wiring path for inverters for whole house.

battery bank-->inverter-->shore power plug

The converter breaker needs to be turned off.

The fridge should be set to propane.

Having a second bank for just the inverter leads to less total power available.

btw BFL13 just did some real life testing on SiO2 batteries and the results are quite encouraging.

newizu

clint, tx

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Posted: 10/23/20 12:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks for your reply. My converter has several switches.
1-MAIN
2-AC
3-Micro & water heater
4-GFIC
5-RECEPTS
6-Converter
Should I turn off just the converter or any other switches.
My unit is a 2007 Four Winds Hurricane model 30Q
Once again. Thank you.

time2roll

Southern California

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Posted: 10/23/20 01:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MAIN-needs to be on
AC-best to have this off
MICRO & W/H is interesting. Must have a load shed device. OK to be off but if you want to use the M/W it is best to set the W/H to propane only.
GFCI-generally you will want this on.
RECEPTS-yes you want this on too.
CONVERTER-off

The only question is where does the fridge get 120v power. Need to switch fridge to propane only unless by luck it is on the converter branch circuit.

Once you have a road map you may want to print it so if a non technical person wants to use the inverter the sequence is very simple.

newizu

clint, tx

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Posted: 10/27/20 07:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thank you all so much. you are real savers.

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