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Open Roads Forum  >  Tow Vehicles

 > enough truck ???

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p.meier

houston, texas/ united states

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Posted: 08/18/20 10:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have the same question for a tow vehicle, the trailer specs.
dry wt 6604#, trailer GVWR - 7600#. Hitch wt. 880# 26ft long, 29'11" overall.
Truck is 2020 Ford F-150. Specs 3.55 rear axle, 3.5L V6 Ecoboost,
Max trailer tow package. 157" wheel base, 6.5 bed.
7000# GVWR package, I think this refferances in the ford brochure a 2270# pay load capacity.
So is this enough truck for this trailer that I can safely pull it with some margin of error. I am confused, I've read this and heard that, I am confused.
Paul

ACZL

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Posted: 08/19/20 12:28am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

What numbers do you have on yellow label on driver's door jam? That will tell you what you have for truck payload capacity. Do you have the truck or looking at it? If possible, fuel it up and go to a truck scale to compare actual numbers (what it weighs and how much left on truck alone). What is truck rated to pull (max trailer weight?). Others w/ more knowledge will chime in and assist you further as well.


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bikendan

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Posted: 08/19/20 03:20am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

p.meier wrote:


7000# GVWR package, I think this refferances in the ford brochure a 2270# pay load capacity.


NOPE! Read the driver's door yellow "Tires and Loading" sticker. It'll say "Occupants and cargo should not exceed xxxxlbs". THAT'S your truck's payload capacity.
Never use brochure or website numbers for actual payload capacity.
And my 2014 F150 with 3.5 Ecoboost and Max Tow package has a GVWR of 7650lbs and my payload is only 1828lbs.
Your lower 7000lbs GVWR will probably mean a lower payload capacity.
And a trailer with a fictional dry tongue weight of 880lbs, will probably over 1000lbs. loaded for camping.


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MFL

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Posted: 08/19/20 05:23am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I agree, with a F150, you need to go by each truck's payload rating on the door sticker. There are so many variations, and options available. The newer model F150s have a little less GVWR, but are lighter wt, so the end result payload number will be similar to a 14 model, with a higher GVWR.

The OP's truck will likely work, fit the payload rating, if he doesn't get crazy, loading the truck full of heavy extras.

Jerry





Mike134

Elgin

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Posted: 08/19/20 06:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

be-careful of the advise.........lots of "group think" on a forum. ( there is a reason they get labeled "the weight police" )Get your weight number accurately from a scale, read up on towing capacities/loading (not from a forum) and then decide for yourself. I've read forum posts saying 1/2 ton shouldn't tow over 6000lbs. Where that nonsense comes from is beyond me. I'm very successful pulling a 7700 GVRW trailer. Good luck.


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BurbMan

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Posted: 08/19/20 06:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

No "group think" here, just the numbers....I have the 3.5 ecoboost in our 2018 Explorer and that motor has the power to tow, no question about it.

The fact is that most all trucks and tow vehicles will exceed their carry capacity with an RV before they reach their towing capacity. In p.meier's case, his brochure tongue weight of 880# is likely to be 1000# in the real world.

Newer 150/1500 trucks have so many configuration options that you need to go by the sticker on the door jamb for what you can carry in your specific truck. Best way to understand what you're towing is to take it to a scale, but hard to do that before you buy it.

That said, most forum posters that tow that class trailer with a 150 have no issues and are happy with how it tows.


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nickthehunter

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Posted: 08/19/20 07:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If the truck as you described it has the Heavy Duty Payload Package, yes, it will handle that trailer. Without the HDPP, then you really need to know what the yellow sticker says; brochure weights have to many "ifs" in them. Read up on what all the numbers mean. Clicky

Groover

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Posted: 08/19/20 07:12am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"Specs 3.55 rear axle, 3.5L V6 Ecoboost,
Max trailer tow package. 157" wheel base, 6.5 bed.
7000# GVWR package, I think this references in the ford brochure a 2270# pay load capacity."

The 2270# payload is only available with the 3.73 axle while max towing capacity is only available with the 3.55 axle. Go figure.

My fully loaded 2016 Screw with 6.5ft bed, Lariat package, 4wd, sunroof, FX4 package, bed liner, tonneau and most every other options weighs about 5,600lbs so theoretically I only have a payload of 1,400lbs.

A lot of the answer to your question depends on how much weight you are going to put in the truck. On the other hand, I have no doubt that my truck would handle the task satisfactorily to my expectations and it is rated for about 2,800lbs less than yours. I do have LT tires, 2,000lb air bags, Rancho 9000 shocks in back and a properly set up weight distributing hitch.

The main requirement for safety is good brakes, make sure that the trailer brakes are in good order and do a couple of stops with just them every time you start a trip to be sure that they are clean. Keep sway under control and the truck reasonably level(as in down about 3" from empty in back) and you should be good to go.

Happy travels!

I was thinking about the fact that you live in Houston and are surrounded by big, wide open areas with occasional 80mph speed limits. That trailer won't be safe behind anything at 80mph on a hot Texas summer day. For starters most trailer tires are only rated at 75mph. An awful lot of how much you truck can tow safely depends on the speed at which you are towing it. I know that 70 is going to seem slow out there but I would not tow that trailer any faster than that even with a dually.

* This post was edited 08/19/20 07:37am by Groover *

Mickeyfan0805

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Posted: 08/19/20 08:27am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As many have said - ignore the book and know your numbers. When shopping for our F150 late last year, I was extremely picky about what we wanted. XLT trim, minimal upgrades, etc. All of this was because every upgrade comes at a cost of payload (those wonderful sunroofs can cost you a couple hundred pounds in and of themselves). Even the more subtle things like the FX4 package can knock 50-100 pounds of the payload. With all of this as background, my XLT shortbed CC has 1,870 pounds of payload. Many other XLTs on the lot were readily 100-300 below that due to options.

The truck is a towing beast - it doesn't even blink at the 8,000 pounds I put behind it (except in the gas gauge!). It's your payload that will matter. With that trailer your hitch is likely to way somewhere around 1,000 pounds (give or take 100). Add another 100 for your WD hitch, and then add the weight of everyone and everything you have/will put in the truck (including aftermarket adds like bedliners, covers, carry bars, etc.). Compare that total to the payload listed on your yellow sticker and that will tell you where things stand.

JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 08/19/20 08:31am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

So is this enough truck for this trailer that I can safely pull it with some margin of error. I am confused, I've read this and heard that, I am confused.
Paul

Pretty typical advice of any rv website when all the trucks weight numbers aren't given. Ford markets over a dozen GVWRs and 5 different RAWRs so its important to know which numbers are on your truck.
Ford also markets what they call a "MAX TOW" package...but it has nothing to do with payload which confuses some owners.

Looking at fleet Ford specs shows a F150 7000 GVWR 2270 lb payload 4050 rawr 156.8" wheelbase 3.5 ecoboost engine 3.55 axle sure won't have any problems pulling that small trailer..

If your truck has the 4050 RAWR then it has plenty of safe load capacity.
You have the truck so drop by a set of CAT scales and weigh the trucks front and rear axle separately. Along with tape measurement this helps in proper WD set up.
Many aluminum F150s empty rear axles are weighing in the 2200-2400 lb range which can leave around 1600-1800 lbs before exceeding a tire/wheel/rear spring pack numbers. Keep in mind all the hitch weight and stuff you carry in the bed sits on the trucks rear axle.

That 2270 lb payload is a GVWR based payload which will have to be spread over the trucks axles. Add 2270 lbs in the bed plus empty trucks 2200-2400 lb axle load = 400-600 lb rear axle overload.
Numbers show how using the silly gvwr payload sticker can lead to a rawr overload condition.

Your F150 won't have issues towing that size trailer if your truck has the 4050 rawr on the drivers side door post cert sticker.


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