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Open Roads Forum  >  Fifth-Wheels

 > tire pressure

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Holland

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Posted: 09/12/20 01:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Rich&Mar wrote:

do you run the max pressure in your tires as written on the sidewall? I have the Endurance, and it states 80# psi. Seems to me you need to take the outside temperature into consideration. I an reluctant to inflate to 80 psi and go on the road when it's 90% out. Then it becomes a guessing game, what psi at 90, at 75, at 45 degrees. 8200lb 5er. The sidewall does read, max pressure, so should you put less due to the temp? Or let the pressure go well over the 80 because of the heat?


Sometimes they write maximum cold pressure, and yes, as already written, pressure rising above yours 80 psi is included in the advice.
A few years ago I read from Capriracer or Tireman9,in a topic, that tires have teststandards, that they have to stand 2 to 3 times the referencepressure( what you think is the max pressure). For 80 psi this would mean ( sit down first) somewhere between 160 and 240 psi.

If you fill with 1.4 times reference ( 1.4 x 80= 112 psi) at freesing point 32 degr F. And incidentially temp in tire rises to boiling point212 degrF, the pressure will rise to a small 2x reference ( 2x 80 psi= 160 psi) , so still within the testing standards.

So dont worry about a the relatively small pressure rising you mention.

But not always maximum 80 psi is needed, for instance tandem-axle trailers can often do with much lower.

Let me calculate a safe pressure for you, with max reserve, but still no bumping.

azdryheat

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Posted: 09/12/20 04:34pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

CapriRacer wrote:

Just so everyone knows: The burst pressure of a tire is many times the max pressure. Unless a tire is on fire, there is no risk of the tire bursting on its own without it being damaged by some object - even in Death Valley!
Disagree. I've seen tires burst while mounted as a spare and never been on the road. One was mounted on the rear of a trailer, under a vinyl cover, and it blew a hole in the cover. Saw another one burst that was mounted under the trailer as a spare. Cheap Chinese tires.

On topic, I never run max pressure in any tire. Tire pressure is a function of the weight being carried. If you're not at max weight there is no reason to be at max psi. My truck tires says 80 max psi. I'd be a fool to run my tires at that pressure. I run 70 front and 65 rear per the door sticker and the scaled weight that I carry. My trailer is at 70 psi.


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TxGearhead

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Posted: 09/12/20 07:45pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Always run trailer tires at max pressure no matter how many axles.
Don't chase the pressure depending on weather.
Trailer and truck tires can easily have 10%+ pressure increase while driving.


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time2roll

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Posted: 09/12/20 08:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Trailer tires get the max. Fill when cold. Best in the morning before you roll and before the sun is on them. Trailer tires are generally maxed out on load and need full pressure. This goes no matter the number of axles.


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fj12ryder

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Posted: 09/12/20 09:09pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TxGearhead wrote:

Always run trailer tires at max pressure no matter how many axles.
...
Maybe if you're running ST tires, but I run my Sailun "G" rated tires at 95 psi rather than the 110 psi that is the max pressure. Makes for a much smoother ride. And with 2000-2500 lbs. per wheel I don't need to run the max pressure.


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Posted: 09/13/20 03:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I’m running G rated Westlakes on my Cedar Creek about 5500 miles now. At 110 psi, in very hot weather, my tire pressure goes up to around 125 psi and 100 degrees temp. At a rest stop the tires heat up to around 125 degrees w very little pressure gain and then cool back down to 100 degrees when I’m back on the road.

For a short recent trip my tires were at 105 psi cold. It was hot outside like 88 degrees but not as bad as the above numbers which the outside temp was over 90 degrees. I got to around 118 psi but the temperatures were around 104 psi rolling. Still good numbers but I’d rather have the psi be greater and the temperature cooler. So I’m gonna air back up to the max pressure before my next trip.

The Westlakes have a bad rep I understand for E rated tires but these g rates tires seem to be holding up very well talking to other Creek owners.

So my advice is to run max pressure on your trailer, there is less sidewall flex and cooler temps which seems to me to be a positive thing to prevent blow outs.

MikeRP

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Posted: 09/13/20 03:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

fj12ryder wrote:

TxGearhead wrote:

Always run trailer tires at max pressure no matter how many axles.
...
Maybe if you're running ST tires, but I run my Sailun "G" rated tires at 95 psi rather than the 110 psi that is the max pressure. Makes for a much smoother ride. And with 2000-2500 lbs. per wheel I don't need to run the max pressure.


I was just wondering if you only have 2500 lbs per tire, why did the manufacturer put g rated tires on your rig? I agree you probably don’t need to run that weight at max pressure. I’m probably at 3000 lbs per tire loaded.

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Posted: 09/13/20 04:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The reason, why maximum pressure of tire is given as advice, is tocover misjudged weights on tires, and inacurate reading of pressure ( wich is often worstcase scerario to high read) .

Also in this topic you estimate the loads on tire, weighing most likely prooves you wrong and to low yudged.
And then when axles weighed, unequall weightdivision R/L wich makes one tire even more weight on it.

But if you weighed best per axle-end, with still a reserve added, a lower pressure probably is yust as safe, and no screws or rivets trembling loose.

CapriRacer

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Posted: 09/13/20 07:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MFL wrote:

CapriRacer wrote:

Just so everyone knows: The burst pressure of a tire is many times the max pressure. Unless a tire is on fire, there is no risk of the tire bursting on its own without it being damaged by some object - even in Death Valley!


Interesting...I know it would vary, all ST tires not being equal, in quality and design, but what would you consider a possible psi bursting point of the OPs GY Endurance E-rated tire, if air is continuously added? I know you can not give an exact psi, but maybe a range of psi guess?

Jerry


Over 200 psi!


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fj12ryder

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Posted: 09/13/20 07:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MikeRP wrote:

fj12ryder wrote:

TxGearhead wrote:

Always run trailer tires at max pressure no matter how many axles.
...
Maybe if you're running ST tires, but I run my Sailun "G" rated tires at 95 psi rather than the 110 psi that is the max pressure. Makes for a much smoother ride. And with 2000-2500 lbs. per wheel I don't need to run the max pressure.


I was just wondering if you only have 2500 lbs per tire, why did the manufacturer put g rated tires on your rig? I agree you probably don’t need to run that weight at max pressure. I’m probably at 3000 lbs per tire loaded.
It's a triple axle toyhauler that came with "E" rated ST tires from the factory. They were the notorious "China bombs" and I had two blow out within 2 years. I wasn't about to go back with another set of ST tires, and LT tires would have been okay, but not great. So I went with the Sailun "G" rated tires. When I bought them, they were labeled "LT" tires, but stated on the sidewall: "For Trailer Use Only", and now they're labeled "ST" tires.

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