RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Around the Campfire: Wolves as Pets

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Around the Campfire

Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire  >  General Topics

 > Wolves as Pets

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next
Sponsored By:
down home

south

Senior Member

Joined: 06/01/2008

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/14/20 12:34am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

They say emphatically there are no wolves in Tennessee but..in 78 or79 I saw two gray wolves nearly run into my lap!
Folks in the County Historical Society where Mom was raised and I spent a lot of my youth report them also.
I have no doubt if I can get into the area I can capture one but hopefully, if I do it in the spring I can find a Pup.
This is all of course contingent on health.
Anyone here raised a full blood gray wolf for a pet and family protector?

Moderator

Bowling Green, KY

Moderator

Joined: 01/19/2004

View Profile



Posted: 09/14/20 06:32am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

TENNESSEE

"No wolves may be possessed without a permit, which includes very rigid pen specifications. Permits are issued only to zoos, circuses, and commercial propagators. Wolves are considered to be Class I wildlife. Wolf Hybrids of any percentage are not regulated by the Agency and are classified as Class III animals."

Crowe

Merrimack, NH

Senior Member

Joined: 01/29/2002

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 09/14/20 06:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Why would you? Leave wildlife wild.


I may not have gone where I intended to go, but I think I have ended up where I needed to be Douglas Adams

RV-less for now but our spirits are still on the open road.

Guy Roan

Florida

Senior Member

Joined: 09/04/2012

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/14/20 07:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

down home wrote:

They say emphatically there are no wolves in Tennessee but..in 78 or79 I saw two gray wolves nearly run into my lap!
Folks in the County Historical Society where Mom was raised and I spent a lot of my youth report them also.
I have no doubt if I can get into the area I can capture one but hopefully, if I do it in the spring I can find a Pup.
This is all of course contingent on health.
Anyone here raised a full blood gray wolf for a pet and family protector?


For what it is worth:
I live in the high mountains of NC almost on the TN border.
We have Coyotes living on the mountain across from us and each night and occasionally during the day we can hear their yapping and barking.
We have lived on the west coast and have seen the Coyotes there, which are gray, but much smaller than gray wolves.
I was told that the Coyotes here are much larger and often mistaken for Gray wolves and finally several years ago had one cross the road in front of me one night. I was astounded at it's size and would have sworn it was a gray wolf, but the following morning a neighbor informed that what I saw was indeed a Coyote and sees them in his game cam lots of times.

Guy

Crowe

Merrimack, NH

Senior Member

Joined: 01/29/2002

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 09/14/20 08:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

For what it is worth:
I live in the high mountains of NC almost on the TN border.
We have Coyotes living on the mountain across from us and each night and occasionally during the day we can hear their yapping and barking.
We have lived on the west coast and have seen the Coyotes there, which are gray, but much smaller than gray wolves.
I was told that the Coyotes here are much larger and often mistaken for Gray wolves and finally several years ago had one cross the road in front of me one night. I was astounded at it's size and would have sworn it was a gray wolf, but the following morning a neighbor informed that what I saw was indeed a Coyote and sees them in his game cam lots of times.

Guy


Where I lived in MA it was very similar. If you didn't know they were coyotes you'd swear they were wolves due to their size. They may have actually been coy-wolves but without DNA testing we'll never know for sure. Surprisingly enough the coyotes are smaller where we now live in NH.

pitch

NY

Senior Member

Joined: 06/08/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/14/20 08:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Eastern coyotes are not the same animal as Western. Much larger, different social and hunting habits.Nor are they wolves.

https://theconversation.com/why-the-east........-be-a-separate-species-the-coywolf-59214

BCSnob

Middletown, MD

Senior Member

Joined: 02/23/2002

View Profile



Posted: 09/14/20 08:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you want a fearsome family protector you have a better chance of training a Caucasian Ovcharka than a wolf; at least the Caucasian Ovcharka has been domesticated. And they are legal to own.

Horsedoc

Dixie --- N. Georgia

Senior Member

Joined: 09/30/2002

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/14/20 09:08am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

This appeared in a local message board several years ago. Likely not exactly right.

Gray Wolf in Great Smoky Mountains
United States Department of Interior and authorities of The Great Smokey Mountains National Park just announced the re-introduction of the Gray Wolf into the GSMNP. Similar to efforts in the Yellowstone National Parks, this re-introduction is in response to portions of the park being overrun with feral hogs. Wolves in Yellowstone have significantly lowered the elk population there, allowing meadows and grazing height shrubs and lower limbs to regenerate.
The feral hogs in GSMNP are running rampant in their breeding, producing up to three litters per year with up possibilities of a dozen piglets in each litter. Their continuous ‘rooting’ and searching for food has caused tremendous damages inside the park, according to park authorities. The grouse and wild turkeys in the park nest on the ground and the most recent count of wild turkey population showed only about 10 percent of the turkey population found in past years. These hogs feed, not only on nuts from the hardwood trees but roots and stems on succulents in the lower areas around the numerous streams inside the park. This damage to the ground and ground cover will then erode when heavy rains, common in the park, occur. Runoff soil and sediments then damage the fisheries of the brown and rainbow trout throughout the park. The Brown Trout are endangered in the park at present and with this constant bombardment of soil and sediment in their natural habitat makes the survival of any fry questionable.
It is projected the introduction of the Gray Wolf into the park will lower the feral hog population to the point that trapping by contract trappers and natural die-off will allow the park to recover.

Also announced was the addition of eight additional Bull Elk to supplement the elk population. It is believed the feces of these animals will help fertilize areas damaged by the feral hogs.

* This post was edited 09/14/20 10:10am by an administrator/moderator *


horsedoc
2008 Damon Essence
2013 Jeep Sahara Unlimited
Blue Ox tow

rk911

DuPage County

Senior Member

Joined: 05/30/2004

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/14/20 11:35am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Crowe wrote:

Why would you? Leave wildlife wild.


+1...big time.


Rich
Ham Radio, Sport Pilot
_________________________________
2016 Itasca Suncruiser 38Q
'46 Willys CJ2A
'03 Jeep Wrangler TJ
'10 Jeep Liberty KK

& MaggieThe Wonder Beagle

Pawz4me

North Carolina

Senior Member

Joined: 06/05/2007

View Profile



Posted: 09/14/20 11:39am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I live in the piedmont of NC and have seen several large, gray coyotes that could trick one into believing they were wolves.

As far as wanting a wolf for a pet -- Why? Just ... why? There is no logical, sane reason I can think of that anyone would want or need one. If you want protection there are quite a number of breeds of dogs who would serve the purpose better, not to mention MUCH more reliably.

I'm firmly of the opinion that the closest anyone should come to having a wild animal as a pet is the domesticated house cat. [emoticon]


Me, DH and Yogi (Shih Tzu)
2017 Winnebago Travato 59K

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 2  
Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire  >  General Topics

 > Wolves as Pets
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Around the Campfire


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.