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 > Class C Pros and Cons

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Geeze

Iowa

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Posted: 10/15/20 08:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

surgtech56 wrote:

We have been thinking about getting a Class C vs another TT. Here in Michigan Insurance is around $300-$400 a month for a Class C. One of us thinks a Class C is the one to go and I think a Class C might be more of a headache. We would be buying used, probably in the $40K price point(there abouts). Not sure if we want to tow a vehicle.

Those of you with a Class C can you give me some pros and cons, any information.

I know this is pretty vague, but trying to figure out if this is the way to go. Thank you in advance


My #1 complain is that they are only 30AMP. If you have an opportunity to upgrade to 50 AMP...DO IT!.... We have a rooftop air with built in heat pump, convection microwave, electric water heater and two TV's. My wife can't use a electric skillet or air fryer without shutting off the air/heat pump. Piss poor planning by the manufacturers.

Bea PA

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Posted: 10/17/20 08:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

DH got tired of maintaining a pusher and we sold it. I wanted something to take the grands camping so bought a former rental W/O a slide and with an overhead bunk. Depends on what kind of camping you want to do, we have gone to Nova Scotia with out a toad and had no problems with parking, We have also done shorter trips and our 350 has no problem towing a 4000 lb Vue. We have had popups, trailers, and a number of MH's but I went to a small Class C because of the generator. It's nice to stop at a rest stop and have air while eating lunch. 5 years ago the license for a Class A was 80 dollars a year and now our small Class C is 125 a year so with insurance and maintenance a MH is more expensive than a trailer. Depends on how much you will be using it. We used ours 15 days this year and it cost about 120 dollars a night plus campground fees. This was only counting ins, license, inspection and oil changes. Good Luck


Bea PA
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T18skyguy

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Posted: 10/18/20 11:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

irishtom29 wrote:

Larger Ford based Cs, 30 feet and longer, often have lousy payload, I saw some with under 1000 pounds.

With the advent of slides and automatic leveling, some of the C's are just maxed out weight wise with all that stuff. It makes the handling very ponderous. My next one will be an A.


Retired Anesthetist. LTP. Pilot with mechanic/inspection ratings. Between rigs right now.. Wife and daughter. Four cats which we must obey.

LeslieCovin1974

19 Gilmore Dr Stony Point, NY 10980

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Posted: 10/19/20 05:57am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

irishtom29 wrote:

Larger Ford based Cs, 30 feet and longer, often have lousy payload, I saw some with under 1000 pounds.

it's an eternal dilemma, which is better?

Gjac

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Posted: 10/19/20 07:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

LeslieCovin1974 wrote:

irishtom29 wrote:

Larger Ford based Cs, 30 feet and longer, often have lousy payload, I saw some with under 1000 pounds.

it's an eternal dilemma, which is better?
The dilemma become easier to answer if you know what size you want and how you plan to camp. If you want something short 23-25 ft a C would be fine 26 ft and longer I would look at an A. Also what is important to how you camp. For me outside storage and FW capacity is more important to having a outside TV or sound system. CCC is also very important to me not so much for others. Do you spend a week or more at a CG and want to explore the surrounding area you may need a tow car. If you are more of a traveler and stay a night or two at each CG a 24 ft C without a tow car may work fine. Do you plan to stay at private CG's with FHU's or NP's, NFS, or SP CG's? If private FW and battery power is a non issue. How many people will you travel with? Is performance on hills out west important? Gas C's and A's have the same engines at any length. So short MH's will have better performance than longer ones because of a higher HP/weight ratio. Also age and physical limitations are also something to consider. TT hook ups, backing up, messing with a portable generator become more of a hassle for older folks. Hooking and unhooking a tow car also becomes a hassle to some older people with shoulder or back problems. If you can answer some of these questions the type of MH that best suits your requirements will become much clearer.

falconbrother

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Posted: 10/19/20 12:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We went from a motorhome to a travel trailer. Couldn't be happier. Much simpler to own. Not that a motorhome is a bad thing. It's way more maintenance. Would I get a motorhome again? Only if our lives drastically changed. For what we do the travel trailer is far superior. That is, we hook up, go to our destination, stay a few days. Then maybe move to another destination, stay a few days, then head home. If we were going to be traversing the US a motorhome would be the better choice.

It was nice to have all the amenities of home while rolling down the interstate. I do miss the generator, microwave and bathroom. Of course we have bathroom now but, we have to pull over. The front of the motorhome, where the drivers and passenger seats are is mostly wasted space when camping. In the travel trailer we use all the space, and we have a big slideout, which is solid gold. We had an older class A with the huge windshield. I would freeze up there while driving in the winter. The heat would keep the house warm enough but, it was cold in the very front. Two oil changes, big bucks for tires, insurance, other repairs, etc.. Motorhomes cost way more to own. But, can be worth it. It's nice to get to the campground in terrible weather and not have to get out in it till the morning. We pulled into a campground, in the dark, in East Tennessee in a driving rain. I disconnected the toad, backed in the motorhome and called it a night. The trailer requires more work.

There is no perfect. I'd say that if you plan to do a lot of moving and driving get the motorhome. If you plan to get to your destination and spend time there, get the travel trailer. Towing isn't bad at all as long as you have enough tow vehicle and the hitch is set up correctly. In fact, towing the travel trailer is less stressful for me than driving the motorhome and pulling the toad. I don't really feel the trailer back there 95% of the time, and out trailer is 30 feet long. However, backing a motorhome into a tight space is easy. I never had an issue with that, in the dark, and rain. Backing a 30 foot trailer into a tight spot is more difficult (for me anyway).

Either way you'll be OK. I met some kind folks from Canada that were hauling a travel trailer all over the US. My sister's in-laws pulled a travel trailer from the West coast the the East coast and North and South about every year (with a Dodge 2500). If I were traveling that much I'd rather have a motorhome. They preferred the trailer.

* This post was edited 10/19/20 01:05pm by falconbrother *

pnichols

The Other California

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Posted: 10/19/20 05:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

falconbrother wrote:

We went from a motorhome to a travel trailer. Couldn't be happier. Much simpler to own. Not that a motorhome is a bad thing. It's way more maintenance. Would I get a motorhome again? Only if our lives drastically changed. For what we do the travel trailer is far superior. That is, we hook up, go to our destination, stay a few days. Then maybe move to another destination, stay a few days, then head home. If we were going to be traversing the US a motorhome would be the better choice.

It was nice to have all the amenities of home while rolling down the interstate. I do miss the generator, microwave and bathroom. Of course we have bathroom now but, we have to pull over. The front of the motorhome, where the drivers and passenger seats are is mostly wasted space when camping. In the travel trailer we use all the space, and we have a big slideout, which is solid gold. We had an older class A with the huge windshield. I would freeze up there while driving in the winter. The heat would keep the house warm enough but, it was cold in the very front. Two oil changes, big bucks for tires, insurance, other repairs, etc.. Motorhomes cost way more to own. But, can be worth it. It's nice to get to the campground in terrible weather and not have to get out in it till the morning. We pulled into a campground, in the dark, in East Tennessee in a driving rain. I disconnected the toad, backed in the motorhome and called it a night. The trailer requires more work.

There is no perfect. I'd say that if you plan to do a lot of moving and driving get the motorhome. If you plan to get to your destination and spend time there, get the travel trailer. Towing isn't bad at all as long as you have enough tow vehicle and the hitch is set up correctly. In fact, towing the travel trailer is less stressful for me than driving the motorhome and pulling the toad. I don't really feel the trailer back there 95% of the time, and out trailer is 30 feet long. However, backing a motorhome into a tight space is easy. I never had an issue with that, in the dark, and rain. Backing a 30 foot trailer into a tight spot is more difficult (for me anyway).

Either way you'll be OK. I met some kind folks from Canada that were hauling a travel trailer all over the US. My sister's in-laws pulled a travel trailer from the West coast the the East coast and North and South about every year (with a Dodge 2500). If I were traveling that much I'd rather have a motorhome. They preferred the trailer.


Well, I guess I don't understand why a Class C motorhome cost more to maintain than a TT-plus-tow-vehicle combination. Why doesn't the combination setup have all of the same maintenance considerations in total as a Class C motorhome?

The ONLY advantage I see to the TT-plus-tow-vehicle combination is one has the tow vehicle to use for other things when not on RV trips (but note my last sentence below), and the tow vehicle can be used to run around in when camping at a spot long enough to justify the unhook/hookup efforts.

Just as reference points: We're fortunate to live close enough to a full-service RV repair and maintenace shop that will take care of the whole Class C for us -> all coach issues plus all Ford chassis issues. I also like the fact that the usage mileage of our motorhome's chassis is kept low due to it only being used and worn out when on RV trips.

* This post was edited 10/19/20 05:23pm by pnichols *


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

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