RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Class C Motorhomes: House batteries

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  All

 > House batteries

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next
Sponsored By:
pnichols

The Other California

Senior Member

Joined: 04/26/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 09/26/20 11:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ybconway wrote:

Thanks for all the information, I'll have to reread this a couple of time. There is a small solar system on the camper with one panel. I wasn't sure how effective they are but it may be worth adding extra panels to the system.
We did go out for an hour since I posted, turned the lights off and it is at 12.3 now.
We don't have power at the storage site.
Looking under the unit, Forest River 23c on a 450 chassis there is lots of room on the frame rails to add some battery boxes.


I don't think you mentioned what year your Class C is. Our Class C is a 2005 on an E450 chassis. The engine is a V10 with a 130 amp alternator.

We recharge our two RV batteries about every other day very quietly by idling the V10 engine a bit. The idling V10 can hardly be heard or felt and the 130 amp alternator does a great job of bringing the batteries back up quickly. Other nearby campers will not hear it idling.

Of course this method works at night, during days too cloudy for much solar, and in shaded camping spots. Fuel consumption for an idling V10 is about 7/10 of a gallon per hour and most, if not all, E450 based Class C motorhomes have a 55 gallon fuel tank. The built-in generator will use only around 4/10 of a gallon per hour from the main 55 gallon tank when recharging the batteries, but it will be quite a bit louder.

* This post was edited 09/26/20 11:24pm by pnichols *


Phil, 2005 E450 Itasca Spirit 24V

time2roll

Southern California

Senior Member

Joined: 03/21/2005

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member


Posted: 09/26/20 11:50am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ybconway wrote:

When we got here the meter was showing 12.5 Volts. This morning it is at 12.2.
Is this normal?
I didn't really want to run the generator just because of the noise but am I at the the downside limit?
Yes this is reasonably normal.

12.2 is not really the downside limit but not too early to do some recharging either. Your battery charge is maybe 50% depleted and you should do some charging today. Many run the generator near dinner to also use the microwave etc while they prepare food. Need a couple hours minimum so start the generator at least two hours before any quiet hours limit.

I assume your solar panel is less than 80 watts and will provide a maintenance charge in storage. Not going to charge much while in use. Certainly you can start thinking about expanding the solar charging to be 200 to 400+ watts.

Yes the generator makes noise. To get the most out of the run time you need to verify your converter is charging at 14.2+ volts. Many just trickle charge at 13.6 volts. This makes a huge difference to cut generator time from 10+ hours to be 2 to 4 hours. Check voltage after running 20 minutes. Also post the converter model number for best options.


2001 F150 SuperCrew
2006 Keystone Springdale 249FWBHLS
675w Solar pictures back up

pianotuna

Regina, SK, Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 12/18/2004

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/26/20 11:52am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ybconway wrote:

Looking under the unit, Forest River 23c on a 450 chassis there is lots of room on the frame rails to add some battery boxes.


Charge up at home before you store.

Adding batteries is only part of the solution.

This series of plain english articles may help:

https://freecampsites.net/adding-solar/


Regards, Don
My ride is a 28 foot Class C, 256 watts solar, 556 amp hours of AGM in two battery banks 12 volt batteries, 3000 watt Magnum hybrid inverter, Sola Basic Autoformer, Microair Easy Start.

MDKMDK

Canada

Senior Member

Joined: 10/15/2008

View Profile



Posted: 09/26/20 12:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Some more good reading (marine and RV batteries are similar in terms of the electrical info), and a chart of State of Charge by voltage if you have a digital multi-meter, and specific gravity, if you have wet cell batteries and a hydrometer.
https://www.emarineinc.com/Marine-Batteries-Maintenance-101

As you can see, you've hit on a very popular topic, with many and varied opinions. Hope some of it helps.


Mike.
2018 (2017 Sprinter Cab Chassis) Navion24V + 2016 Wrangler JKU (sold @ ????)
2016 Sunstar 26HE, V10, 3V, 6 Speed (sold @ 4600 miles)
2002 Roadtrek C190P (sold @ 315,000kms)

theoldwizard1

SE MI

Senior Member

Joined: 09/07/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/26/20 12:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pianotuna wrote:

Yes, it is normal.

The batteries need to be fully recharged. The sane way to do that is with shore power.

3 hours of driving won't be enough to fully recharge the battery bank.

Well ... maybe ! If you had a good DC-DC charger and your battery bank is not too large (? two 6V golf cart batteries).

12.2V is about 50% SOC. Discharging further could permanently damage your battery bank if discharged further.

pianotuna wrote:

Look into adding a modest solar system to recharge the battery bank in between trips.

EXCELLENT suggestion, especially if you like to boondock !

theoldwizard1

SE MI

Senior Member

Joined: 09/07/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/26/20 01:03pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

pnichols wrote:

We recharge our two RV batteries about every other day very quietly by idling the V10 engine a bit. The idling V10 can hardly be heard or felt and the 130 alternator does a great job of bringing the batteries back up quickly. Other nearby campers will not hear it idling.

Good suggestion, but I would still add a DC-DC charger. It will bring your battery bank up to 100% state of charge quicker.

bobndot

USA

Senior Member

Joined: 08/21/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/26/20 02:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I run 100w solar on the roof thru an MPPT and a BIM , it keeps my 2 grp 27 deep cycles as well as keeps my chassis battery at a full charge 12.7v while parked. In the event that I'm parked on a shaded site, I have an additional 100w on the ground as a portable system in case of heavy tree cover.


Try to limit what you are drawing off your batts. To conserve my 12v power, I installed a toggle switch on my LP detector which draws about a 1/2 amp. I use a portable battery operated carbon monoxide detector.
I also have a toggle on the radio as well unplugging my tv.
* Some models of power roof vents might have a constant 12v draw while off. If you find that you are experiencing a slight draw with everything off, look into that vent. I forget which brand it was on the vent we found the draw on. It might have been a thermostat or rain sensor in stand-by mode, not sure.

I now have no draw on my coach unless im using something requiring 12v power.
Mr Buddy takes care of my heating **unless it drops below 32F, then I let the furnace kick on because all my water lines plastic valves and water pump are heated thru the furnace.
My 2 grp 27's never drop below 12.2-12.3v after running the furnace during the night an 28-30F outside temp, with the rv thermostat set at 64F. My interior lighting are LED's with very little draw.
An rvs insulation R value and dual pane windows or not will probably have an effect on furnace run time.

P.S. when I say 'full charge' I realize its really probably 90%. Close enough .

Lwiddis

Camping near Pearsonville, CA

Senior Member

Joined: 08/12/2016

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 09/26/20 03:26pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

“but it may be worth adding extra panels to the system”

Provided the solar wiring is big enough and your controller will handle the increased amps, add a panel or two. (I see some reading in your future)


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, 300 watts solar-parallel & MPPT, Trojan T-125s. TALL pole for flags. Prefer USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, USF&WS, state & county camps. Bicyclist! 14 year Army vet - 11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560)


coolmom42

Middle Tennessee

Senior Member

Joined: 02/18/2011

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 09/26/20 04:19pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

All of your lighting is a significant battery draw. Replace as much of it as feasible with LED lighting. It will be a huge improvement in quality of lighting, too.


Single empty-nester in Middle TN, sometimes with a friend or grandchild on board

Dusty R

Charlotte Michigan 48813

Senior Member

Joined: 04/05/2003

View Profile


Online
Posted: 09/26/20 05:22pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Matt_Colie wrote:

Yb,

First off, you are in Ontario, and that is as bad solar-wise as Michigan. The little panel on the roof will probably do a good job of making up for the loss when the coach is stored.

Matt


This is very true. Michigan ranks 47th out of the 48 continental states in available sun shine. I think New Hampshire is 48th.

Dusty

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 3  
Prev  |  Next

Open Roads Forum  >  Class C Motorhomes  >  All

 > House batteries
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Class C Motorhomes


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2020 CWI, Inc. © 2020 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.