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Open Roads Forum  >  Travel Trailers  >  General Q&A

 > sway bar instructions

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Lynnmor

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Posted: 09/29/20 06:56pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ssthrd wrote:

Meaning?


I mean that you know what makes sense despite the nonsense being said about various sway mechanisms.





Terryallan

Foothills NC

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Posted: 09/29/20 08:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

canoe on top wrote:

If this was the first time in 20 years, I would guess that you towed in the rain before. Was there something different in your set up this time? Did you always remove the bars in the rain before?


Only thing I can think of is that I was making a 90 degree turn off the highway steeply down hill. And I can't remember doing that before. I guess everything just lined up to make it happen.


Terry & Shay
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Terryallan

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Posted: 09/29/20 08:20pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Lynnmor wrote:

Terryallan wrote:

Lynnmor wrote:

Then there are all those popular, expensive brands that can't be adjusted for slippery conditions.


You are simply not to use them in slippery conditions. your TT should not sway with out one. They are only for emergency situations.


Then all those folks with the popular, expensive brands need to get off the road at the first sign of inclement weather? Or do they need to remove all the weight distribution and then continue on?


No not WDH. Just the swaybar. The honest truth is. Your travel Trailer should NOT sway in normal driving WITH OUT a sway bar. If it does. You have serious problems. I have towed with out the sway bar. I have no sway.

Terryallan

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Posted: 09/29/20 08:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

From the Reese Sway bar instruction manual.
So there is the instructions. Hoax? BS? you decide. Not according to Reese. Reese says remove it in the rain, or slippery conditions.


4. When towing during slippery conditions such as wet, icy, or snow-covered roads or on loose gravel, turn on/off handle (5)
counterclockwise until all tension is removed from unit. Failure to do so could prevent tow vehicle and trailer from turning properly.

afidel

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Posted: 09/29/20 11:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ssthrd wrote:

TurnThePage wrote:

Lynnmor wrote:

TurnThePage wrote:



Me thinks that the mentioned issue/condition is strictly for the add-on friction sway bars and has nothing to do with all those popular and expensive hitches with anti-sway built in.


The condition is that sway mechanisms keep the truck and trailer in line. When the tire traction is not great enough to overcome the resistance of the sway mechanism, skidding when turning will result. It does not matter what brand, style or price point is involved.
Strictly speaking, I can't argue. I just don't think it's a thing with those "expensive" hitches, while there are various warnings when using the add-on anti-sway bar.


This is confusing-at least in my mind.....

I have an Equal-I-zer with 4 point sway control which uses friction at 4 points to address any sway issues. I do not understand how the effect of the systems are different. In other words, how can one system using friction be safe in slippery conditions, and another not? Since they both work to keep the trailer and the truck in line using the same principle, how can they be different?

An email from Equal-I-zer tells me that it is not an issue, but they gave no explanation about how their system works in any conditions, while others are not safe and should be removed.

Physics was always one of my best subjects, but I can't get my head around this one. Any engineers out there that can shed some light on this for me?


My guess is that while the Equalizer resists slipping, it will eventually slip, likely well before the truck is to lose traction. It's basically the same reason you have to take off a friction sway bar but don't have to remove the Equalizer when backing into a spot, you'll get the classic pop and groan but the bar will slip on the plate.


2017 KZ Sportsmen Classic 181BH
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Terryallan

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Posted: 09/30/20 07:19am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

afidel wrote:

ssthrd wrote:

TurnThePage wrote:

Lynnmor wrote:

TurnThePage wrote:



Me thinks that the mentioned issue/condition is strictly for the add-on friction sway bars and has nothing to do with all those popular and expensive hitches with anti-sway built in.


?


My guess is that while the Equalizer resists slipping, it will eventually slip, likely well before the truck is to lose traction. It's basically the same reason you have to take off a friction sway bar but don't have to remove the Equalizer when backing into a spot, you'll get the classic pop and groan but the bar will slip on the plate.


The real reason you are to remove the add on sway bar for backing, is because you can jack the trailer MORE when backing than going forward. That can cause the sway bar to overtravel, and either bottom out on the balls, or pull apart the other way. Really doesn't have anything to do with added force. But when it bottoms out. It can break the mounting balls off.

canoe on top

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Posted: 10/01/20 11:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Terryallen, 90 degrees is a pretty hard turn, Steep down hill would suggest that the front axle dropped. The rear axle would act as a fulcrum applying an unusual amount of leverage to your hitch bars. This would increase the amount of friction which may have affected your steering? Just a thought.

canoe on top

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Posted: 10/01/20 11:21am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not sure what kind of set up you have. Sounds like an external sway bar as opposed to integral WD anti sway like Equal-i-zer. I don't know if that kind of bar would be affected by the TV going up or down a steep incline? Sounds like an external, friction sway bar might have more effect on steering than a hitch with integrated sway control?

Vintage465

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Posted: 10/02/20 04:04pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Since 1981 I've towed with "lower rent" type W.D. lashups with friction type sway control always. And by lower rent I mean Eas-Lift, Valley Tow-Rite, Draw-Tite and Reese versions of the chain type snap ups and not the integrated sway. I've never read the instructions for my friction type sway control. Never thought I needed too. Everything said about the friction sway being tight enough to overcome the traction on the front tires of the tow rig makes sense. I will consider myself more educated today than I was yesterday. Mine is very adjustable(not "on or off")I will back mine off a 1/2 turn when towing in the rain and make further adjustments as needed. In recent years I've heard and read about not backing up with the sway control in place. I've always backed up with the friction type sway control on and never had an issue. Recently I pulled into a spot I had no business being, and literally tied the rig up in knots to get out and had no issues. It was good entertainment for all the onlookers though!


V-465
2013 GMC 2500HD Duramax Denali. 2015 CreekSide 20fq w/450 watts solar and 465 amp/hour of batteries. Retiring in 2021, then look-out road, here we come!

LarryJM

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Posted: 10/03/20 04:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ssthrd wrote:

TurnThePage wrote:

Lynnmor wrote:

TurnThePage wrote:



Me thinks that the mentioned issue/condition is strictly for the add-on friction sway bars and has nothing to do with all those popular and expensive hitches with anti-sway built in.


The condition is that sway mechanisms keep the truck and trailer in line. When the tire traction is not great enough to overcome the resistance of the sway mechanism, skidding when turning will result. It does not matter what brand, style or price point is involved.
Strictly speaking, I can't argue. I just don't think it's a thing with those "expensive" hitches, while there are various warnings when using the add-on anti-sway bar.


This is confusing-at least in my mind.....

I have an Equal-I-zer with 4 point sway control which uses friction at 4 points to address any sway issues. I do not understand how the effect of the systems are different. In other words, how can one system using friction be safe in slippery conditions, and another not? Since they both work to keep the trailer and the truck in line using the same principle, how can they be different?

An email from Equal-I-zer tells me that it is not an issue, but they gave no explanation about how their system works in any conditions, while others are not safe and should be removed.

Physics was always one of my best subjects, but I can't get my head around this one. Any engineers out there that can shed some light on this for me?


IMO the issue and difference between what we are calling the "Friction Bar" system and all the other integrated WDH/Sway systems is that the "Friction" system using common brake pad material clamped on each side against a metal bar. This system has a much higher coefficient of friction inititally plus when wet can basically "stick or grab" at times. While all the metal on metal systems might have a higher initial coefficient of friction it's not near as high as with the brake pad to metal situation in the "Friction" type systems. This issue is also again IMO why one has to be very careful or even remove/loosen the "Friction" system when backing since the extreme inital angles that can occur when starting to back up can be much more stressful on the Friction system than others non brake pad based systems. This is really critical when the trailer and TV are at an large angle where the bar is already pulled out and you suddenly have the TV wheels turned all the way in the other direction which will force the bar back into the stationary part of the system and start backing up too quickly. This "extreme" condition can actually "BEND" the metal slide bar.

All the above is admittedly just my opinion based on over 30 years of using a "Friction" type system and actually wearing as system out (i.e. one side of the brake material was worn down to where the side bar was making metal to metal contact where the brake material used to be)

Larry


2001 standard box 7.3L E-350 PSD Van with 4.10 rear and 2007 Holiday Rambler Aluma-Lite 8306S Been RV'ing since 1974.
RAINKAP INSTALL////ETERNABOND INSTALL


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