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dave17352

Ne

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Posted: 10/10/20 07:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Just ready to head out in our new to use rig. Its a 2016 260ds Leprechaun. I was checking tire pressure and airing up. Door panel says 65 front 80 rears. I am probably about 13k and the rig has a max of about 14.5. I have not weighed her yet but I have 3k ccc. We are loaded lite. I know things add up quickly as I have had many rigs.


Back to the original question. Assuming I am running well under max what do you folks with a 27 foot class c run your pressures at.

Thanks
Dave


NOW 2017 Leprechaun 260ds
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jdc1

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Posted: 10/10/20 08:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Follow the manufacture's label. They know more about their vehicle than we do.

Lwiddis

Camping near Pearsonville, CA

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Posted: 10/10/20 08:24pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The C manufacturer knows best.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, 300 watts solar-parallel & MPPT, Trojan T-125s. TALL pole for flags. Prefer USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, USF&WS, state & county camps. Bicyclist! 14 year Army vet - 11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560)


DrewE

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Posted: 10/10/20 08:52pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If and when you get actual axle weights for your rig as set up for your use, you can use them. Until then, the door sticker pressures are a reasonable start; they assume the axles are at full gross weight, and you're probably not too far off of that, at least not enough to make a vast difference in the proper tire pressures.





Desert Captain

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Posted: 10/10/20 08:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

"Follow the manufacture's label. They know more about their vehicle than we do."

No, they don't,

They have no clue how you will load. The ONLY way to properly inflate your tires is to load the rig as you would for a given trip and take it to the CAT scale. Don't forget to include the weight of your tanks, fresh, gray and black. Keep in mind that your actual weight can vary greatly from trip to trip and while a return to the CAT scale is not essential every time you will have a pretty good handle on what you are actually hauling.{it is probably a lot more than you think}.

Once you know what the rig actually weighs go to the inflation load tables from the manufacturer of your tires and follow those numbers. Blindly following the numbers on the door sticker or worse, inflating to the maximum on the sidewalls is a recipe for disaster.

While most folks leave with empty black and gray tanks not everyone gets to come home that way. Often, on weekends, especially on holiday weekends, the line at the dump station may be hours long. If you choose to drive home with full tanks you have added a lot of extra weight.
some folks run with a full fresh water tank while others assume they can just fill up when they get to the CG, either way that weight {coming/going} needs to be factored into the the load your tires are subject to.

[emoticon]





JIMNLIN

Oklahoma

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Posted: 10/10/20 10:18pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

we have a class C forum. Ask a mod/adm to move your question over there.
I betcha' you'll get more answers from those who have that size MH.

A tire pressure on the vehicles tire placard is good for a certain weight and a certain tire size/load range. If the tires have been changed to a different size/load range then the placard won't work. Get the units axle weights and use the tire mfg pressure/load charts for best tire pressures.


"good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes from bad judgment" ............ Will Rogers

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Grit dog

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Posted: 10/11/20 02:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Aside from “recipe for disaster” Desert Capitan explained the answer to your question perfectly, IMO.
Having a bit more pressure than you need is not major cause for concern. Rougher ride than necessary and a bit less traction in low traction situations, but not inherently unsafe.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

wa8yxm

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Posted: 10/11/20 04:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Till you scale it go with the maker's mark (No not the booze) The manfacturer's recommendation.

Then get it weighed and use the Tire Maker's inflation chart.

I say that because there are a few inflation pressures all but guaranteed to be wrong

1: The number on the sidewall (Actually it's right but you need to read the full sentence: Maximum load of xxxxx pounds at maximum pressure of yy PSI)

2: the pressure on the sticker (They do not know know much STUFF you have)

3: The pressure the tire dealer puts in.

On my rig.. turns out the sidewall is correct as loaded.


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PartyOf Five

Wheaton, IL

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Posted: 10/11/20 06:29am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

31' C and we run heavy so i load the rears to max, 80 each. The fronts usually at 70 as they seem to handle better than at 65. If it's hot we drive off hours since we can't bring the rear pressures down. If the pavement or weather is poor, we slow down, otherwise we're not too concerned with nominal changes to mileage or handling. Tire age is probably more important to think about.


PartyOf5: Us 2 & 3 pre-teens trying to connect, learn, appreciate creation & the Creator. 5 yrs, 50k

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pitch

NY

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Posted: 10/11/20 06:59am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Desert Captain wrote:

"Follow the manufacture's label. They know more about their vehicle than we do."

No, they don't,

They have no clue how you will load. The ONLY way to properly inflate your tires is to load the rig as you would for a given trip and take it to the CAT scale. Don't forget to include the weight of your tanks, fresh, gray and black. Keep in mind that your actual weight can vary greatly from trip to trip and while a return to the CAT scale is not essential every time you will have a pretty good handle on what you are actually hauling.{it is probably a lot more than you think}.

Once you know what the rig actually weighs go to the inflation load tables from the manufacturer of your tires and follow those numbers. Blindly following the numbers on the door sticker or worse, inflating to the maximum on the sidewalls is a recipe for disaster.

While most folks leave with empty black and gray tanks not everyone gets to come home that way. Often, on weekends, especially on holiday weekends, the line at the dump station may be hours long. If you choose to drive home with full tanks you have added a lot of extra weight.
some folks run with a full fresh water tank while others assume they can just fill up when they get to the CG, either way that weight {coming/going} needs to be factored into the the load your tires are subject to.

[emoticon]


"recipe for disaster" yep we need some drama here![emoticon]

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