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Open Roads Forum  >  Truck Campers

 > Truck Camper Weight...I know, I know

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gbsteph

Grand Prairie, Texas USA

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Posted: 10/15/20 03:39pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I appreciate all the info and especially the formulas for calculation. I have already started looking where I can trim a few things here and there, and I did weigh it with me, the driver and my GF as passenger, which is the norm. Will look into the axle size info.

Thanks again
GB

jimh406

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Posted: 10/15/20 04:37pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ticki2 wrote:

jimh425 wrote:

I don’t think FAWR and/or RAWR means how much you can brake. That being said, it would make logical sense that the truck could probably stop the GCWR or a little more assuming they have a bit more capability built in. I’d also say the F450s in many years have much better brakes than other years and yet the GCWR is only a few more thousand lbs more.


This is your original statement , no mention of trailer brakes .


And?


'10 Ford F-450, 6.4, 4.30, 4x4, 14,500 GVWR, '06 Host Rainer 950 Dbl Slide, Torklift Talon tiedowns, Glow Steps, and Fastguns. Bilstein 4600s, Firestone Air Bags, Toyo M655 225/19.5 Gs, Curt front hitch, Energy Suspension bump stops.


jerryleejr

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Posted: 12/12/20 07:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Ok I’m gonna ask and hope it doesn’t get lost in the 18 wheeler braking tangent. Can one assume the same axle is used in the same model year truck and the difference in RAWR is based off SRW vs DRW configuration? I ask because the truck I’m looking at has a 3K difference between the two...

JJ

jimh406

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Posted: 12/12/20 08:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

No, you can't assume they do.

Kayteg1

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Posted: 12/12/20 08:26am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

jerryleejr wrote:

Ok I’m gonna ask and hope it doesn’t get lost in the 18 wheeler braking tangent. Can one assume the same axle is used in the same model year truck and the difference in RAWR is based off SRW vs DRW configuration? I ask because the truck I’m looking at has a 3K difference between the two...

JJ

There is more to RAWR than axle.
When it is quite common the same axle is used in whole line of different vehicles, it can be coupled to different springs and different brakes.
Not to mention that differential can have several different gearings.
Common wisdom says that US-build axles can take overload quite well and several members do it all the time, while installing 19.5 wheels.
But as pointed- what about braking force?
Beside ClassA motorhomes, I did not own vehicle who I could not lock the wheels on dry pavement, but on some vehicles that can take several hundreds pounds push on brake pedal.
Not something everybody can do.





jerryleejr

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Posted: 12/12/20 08:40am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:

jerryleejr wrote:

Ok I’m gonna ask and hope it doesn’t get lost in the 18 wheeler braking tangent. Can one assume the same axle is used in the same model year truck and the difference in RAWR is based off SRW vs DRW configuration? I ask because the truck I’m looking at has a 3K difference between the two...

JJ

There is more to RAWR than axle.
When it is quite common the same axle is used in whole line of different vehicles, it can be coupled to different springs and different brakes.
Not to mention that differential can have several different gearings.
Common wisdom says that US-build axles can take overload quite well and several members do it all the time, while installing 19.5 wheels.
But as pointed- what about braking force?
Beside ClassA motorhomes, I did not own vehicle who I could not lock the wheels on dry pavement, but on some vehicles that can take several hundreds pounds push on brake pedal.
Not something everybody can do.

I understand there’s a lot of variables but let’s say a Ram 3500 chassis cab comes in both SRW and DRW configurations. The SRW lists 6800 RAWR and 9850 for the DRW. That’s why I’m assuming it’s the tires...

JJ

Kayteg1

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Posted: 12/12/20 09:10am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I doubt SRW and DRW have the same springs?
That beside the fact that the number you posted might be result of taxation and have loose connection with actual axle capacities.
SRW usually are sold with GVW below 10k lb, when DRW below 15k lb.
That is due that in most of the states rating it above those numbers might bring commercial requirements, different smog requirements and definitely higher fees.
My F450 had sticker for 15k lb, where set of tires added to 22k lb and I actually used it above 20k lb.

srschang

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Posted: 12/12/20 12:08pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Kayteg1 wrote:

I doubt SRW and DRW have the same springs?
That beside the fact that the number you posted might be result of taxation and have loose connection with actual axle capacities.
SRW usually are sold with GVW below 10k lb, when DRW below 15k lb.
That is due that in most of the states rating it above those numbers might bring commercial requirements, different smog requirements and definitely higher fees.
My F450 had sticker for 15k lb, where set of tires added to 22k lb and I actually used it above 20k lb.


I only have one data point, but my 2020 Ram 3500 SRW has a GVW of 12,300 lb.


2020 Ram 3500 SRW Crewcab Longbed Cummins, 2019 Northstar 12 STC

Kayteg1

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Posted: 12/12/20 10:33pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

srschang wrote:



I only have one data point, but my 2020 Ram 3500 SRW has a GVW of 12,300 lb.

Don't know about NY, but when in CA, you are obligated to drive via all DOT scales.
Plenty of them in the state.

* This post was edited 12/12/20 10:44pm by Kayteg1 *

srschang

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Posted: 12/13/20 05:49am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

In NY, all pickup trucks have commercial plates. There is no requirement for pickup trucks to pull into weigh stations.

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