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 > Veterans News Update New Agent Orange Diseases

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NamMedevac 70

Reno

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Posted: 12/11/20 08:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

[image]The 2020 National Defense Authorization Act bill just passed both houses of Congress and is awaiting POTUS signature who may or may not veto the bill due to issues he disagrees with. The bill is veto proof so it will eventually become law.

This bill authorizes VA Secretary to add 3 new presumptive diseases to long list of AO illnesses already approved for Vietnam veterans service connection disability due to exposure the DOD defoliant Agent Orange that was aerial sprayed throughout Vietnam in the 60s and 70s.

These new added diseases are 1. Bladder Cancer, 2. Parkinsonism and 3. Hypothyroidism



More info is found on my website on link to Veterans Information Journal post number 2 https://www.facebook.com/VetJournal

On another note families of Vietnam veterans may be interested in the book "Dustoff And Medevac" by former pilot Phil Marshall containing 26 true stories of the very dangerous missions flown by the Army's unarmed UH-1H medevac helicopter crews in Nam. These units were assigned to the Army Medical service Corp Command and although their numbers were small their loss rate of crews and aircraft were the highest of all Army aviation units. I have no financial interest in the book but at least 6 of my combat missions are told in the book including a tragic shoot down of our aircraft in June of 70. The book is sold on Amazon along with many other books on the Nam War.

[image][/img]

* This post was last edited 12/15/20 09:25pm by NamMedevac 70 *   View edit history

NJRVer

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Posted: 12/11/20 08:54pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Hypothyroidism?

What is the rate of that in the general population vs AO exposure?

Very common. My mother and 5 of us kids have that, not to mention aunts and uncles.

NamMedevac 70

Reno

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Posted: 12/12/20 12:44am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

According to scientific studies conducted over the years by several institutes there is more than a casual nexus between veterans in Nam diagnosed with Hypothyroidism versus non vietnam veteran groups that are free of this diagnosis. The same is true for the other AO diseases.

Since the aerial spraying was conducted over vast areas of Nam for over many years then all who set foot on Vietnam soil are by law presumed to have been exposed and this includes navy personnel of the inland waterways, harbors and on ships near the Vietnam coast.

A google search of the topic Agent Orange Hypothyroidism will reveal names of these institutes and detailed info on their studies.

https://www.facebook.com/VetJournal

* This post was edited 12/15/20 09:25pm by NamMedevac 70 *

Old-Biscuit

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Posted: 12/12/20 10:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I'm surprised at Hypothyroidism being included

*Common (More than 200,000 cases per year in US)
*Common for ages 60 and older
*More common in females
*Family history may increase likelihood

My Thyroid QUIT working completely (38 yrs old)
Yes I was VN Veteran (Blue Water Navy)
Yes Ship was within the 12 mile limit -----but records are hard to find/prove it
Yes Mother had to have hers removed

Just surprised Hypothyroidism is 'AO Presumed' as it is so common among the general population



THANKS for posting.
Hadn't HEARD about the 2020 National Defense Authorization Act
Will be watching for the 'signing'


Image you attempted to post
[image]

* This post was edited 12/12/20 10:25am by Old-Biscuit *


Is it time for your medication or mine?


2007 DODGE 3500 QC SRW 5.9L CTD In-Bed 'quiet gen'
2007 HitchHiker II 32.5 UKTG 2000W Xantex Inverter
On the Road Debt Free April '07
Off the road still Debt Free Jan. '14

NamMedevac 70

Reno

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Posted: 12/12/20 08:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I forgot to mention that this presumption of veterans exposure to Agent Orange toxin applies to those who served on or near the Korean DMZ during certain years and also to those who served on base perimeter guard duty and other designated locations on Army and Air force bases in Thailand during the Vietnam War. There may be other places where vets were presumed exposed.

Over period of many years Congress seems to have taken the attitude to give the veteran the benefit of the doubt and this is even written into law regarding VA claims procedures. Soon there may be more burn pit and AO registry s.

I will soon be listing links to more info on this topic on my FB page Veterans Information Journal
https://www.facebook.com/VetJournal.

In the early years of the Agent Orange debate in the 90s some vets who claimed they handled the spraying of AO also claim they drank the stuff with no harm done to them. Of course they were stupid liars and quickly dropped out of sight.

* This post was last edited 12/15/20 09:27pm by NamMedevac 70 *   View edit history

Old-Biscuit

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Posted: 12/13/20 10:14am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Exposure to Agent Orange in Vietnam

For the purposes of VA compensation benefits, Veterans who served anywhere in Vietnam between January 9, 1962 and May 7, 1975 are presumed to have been exposed to herbicides, as specified in the Agent Orange Act of 1991.

These Veterans do not need to show that they were exposed to Agent Orange or other herbicides in order to get disability compensation for diseases related to Agent Orange exposure.

Service in Vietnam means service on land in Vietnam or the inland waterways of Vietnam.
This includes Veterans who:
*Set foot in Vietnam (This includes brief visits ashore, such as when a ship docked to the shore of Vietnam or when a ship operated in Vietnam's close coastal waters for extended periods and crew members went ashore, or smaller vessels from the ship went ashore with supplies or personnel. The Veteran further must provide a statement of personally going ashore.)
*Served on a ship while it operated on the inland waterways of Vietnam

Blue Water Veterans who served on a vessel operating not more than 12 nautical miles seaward from the demarcation line of the waters of Vietnam and Cambodia as defined in Public Law 116-23 are eligible for the Agent Orange Registry. Note: being in the registry does not verify eligibility for benefits.


Korean Demilitarized Zone and Agent Orange Exposure

Veterans who served in a unit in or near the Korean demilitarized zone (DMZ) anytime between September 1, 1967 and August 31, 1971 are presumed to have been exposed to herbicides. These Veterans do not have to show they were exposed to Agent Orange to be eligible for disability compensation for these diseases.

VA and the Department of Defense must determine that the Veteran’s unit operated in the DMZ area and the Veteran was physically there.



C-123 Airplanes and Agent Orange Residue

Some Air Force Reservists who were crew members on C-123 Provider aircraft, formerly used to spray Agent Orange during the Vietnam War, have raised health concerns about exposure to residual amounts of herbicides on plane surfaces.

Responding to these concerns, VA asked the Health and Medicine Division (HMD) (formally known as the Institute of Medicine) of the National Academy of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine to study possible exposure and increase in adverse health effects in C-123 crew members.

C-123 Airplanes and the Agent Orange Registry
Veterans (including some Reservists) who state that they flew on or worked on a C-123 aircraft between 1969 and 1986 are eligible for the Agent Orange Registry.


Thailand Military Bases

VA considers disability benefits claims based on exposure to herbicides on a U.S. military base in Thailand or Royal Thai Air Force base between January 9, 1962, and May 7, 1975, on a case-by-case basis.

Herbicide Tests and Storage Outside Vietnam

Possible exposure due to Department of Defense herbicide tests and storage at military installations in the United States and at locations in other countries.


Point is....IF you served and 'suspect' AO Exposure....see your DOC/Get Medical Reports/File a VA Claim

Veterans' Diseases Associated with Agent Orange
PLUS the three newly recognized diseases/conditions
1. Bladder Cancer, 2. Parkinsonism and 3. Hypothyroidism

MEXICOWANDERER

las peñas, michoacan, mexico

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Posted: 12/13/20 12:47pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

For unlucky souls (jarheads) that prowled deep into deforested areas they could not help but contact defoliant. Not only that they chemically sterilized drinking water that had washed off vegetation and into rivers and streams.

When we went out onto the river and up and down canals we maintained contact with the "Ranch Hands", airborne personnel flying defoliant missions. They avoided our mission by a wide margin. For us river rats we avoided the worst of it and never got hosed by a dump.

NamMedevac 70

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Posted: 12/13/20 07:12pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MEXICOWANDERER wrote:

For unlucky souls (jarheads) that prowled deep into deforested areas they could not help but contact defoliant. Not only that they chemically sterilized drinking water that had washed off vegetation and into rivers and streams.

When we went out onto the river and up and down canals we maintained contact with the "Ranch Hands", airborne personnel flying defoliant missions. They avoided our mission by a wide margin. For us river rats we avoided the worst of it and never got hosed by a dump.


Yes right on. The AO toxin was washed into the rivers and streams all throughout Vietnam and in most Army bases such as mine at LZ Uplift, LZ english, Lane Army Heliport, etc. etc. our drinking water came directly from nearby rivers and streams. Boiling the water does not kill the powerful toxin and the decontamination pills did nothing. They put packets of cool aid in our drinking bladders to cover up the foul taste of local water sort of.

According to reports I read many years ago AO has a very long life of many years and is absorbed directly into all plants and vegetation and skin and sprayed as a fine mist is of course inhaled by those close by during spraying. In addition to C-123 Ranch Hand aircraft AO was sprayed from helicopters and trucks along military base perimeters and I have seen many photos of this taken by aircrews and grunts during their tours in Nam. Lots and lots of photos on the internet also.

Most controversial arguments about AO effects on humans have been solved by now.

NamMedevac 70

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Posted: 12/30/20 03:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

A memorial headstone in Texas honoring the Vietnam veterans who have died from many diseases due to exposure to Vietnam Agent Orange toxin in the Vietnam War.

According to one report as many as 300,000 have died prematurely since the war from the several cancers, heart disease, Diabetes, Parkinson and others, etc. Scientific studies and evidence supports this nexus.

[image]The American chemical Dow/DuPont gift that keeps on giving.

down home

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Posted: 12/30/20 06:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

If you drank milk in Viet Nam it was reconstituted with water from the river in Saigon and it was full of Agent Orange I was told. It was sprayed around the bases to control weeds...and to get rid of foliage that shielded the VC and NVA if they attacked. I saw it sprayed, myself around the hoochs but more so around the perimeter.
I took a 2/12 ton up hwy 1 and missed my turn to a depot, entered a village where not even a fly was stirring. Totally empty!
Every blade of grass, every tree and plant was orange brown! I turned around real quick and got out. There was a reason ti was empty.
There was no destruction. It could have been a set for a movie, it was so well constructed!
Probably the Villagers were told the NVA were on their way and they left real quick. The VC were always among them.

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