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Sjm9911

New Jersey

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Posted: 12/19/20 06:38am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have a little TT and previously a pup. So i have the smaller ceramic heater. They work great, but as others said they need to be secured, or at least minded so they are not near any combustibles. I placed mine in the middle of the old style metal milk crate and put that on the table. Secure it with bungees. My daughter is 9 now but i used that method for years in case she got up and knocked it around.


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rhagfo

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Posted: 12/19/20 06:46am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

wa8yxm wrote:

The problem is not the heater. most of them are safe now days (I like to avoid the ones that glow red however) Ceramics tend to be very compact. Oil filled very large. But all of them give exactly the same amount of heat for the same amount of electricity. all heaters are 100% efficient so if the maker says something like "3 times more efficient" they are lying. (The reason is in an electrical system all losses express as heat, with a heater this is the desired output so all losses are recovered).

Page 2: The Danger
Quick box or Unibox outlets use punch down connectors that are great at say 100mA or less (telephone current) but not so good when the amps hit double digits.

A 1500 watt heater is 12.5 amps I had one outlet overheat I've seen them melted down and wires broken and acing. Serious fire hazard AND I AM NOT AN RV SERVICE TECHINICIAN just what I've seen

I used assorted electric heaters. mostly hot (but not red) wire, some ceramic. for 15 years. But I also installed special circuits (3 of them) two were dedicatred circuit breaker via 12ga wire to a 15/20 amp duplex outlet (has a "T" shaped neutral slot) the third was 12-ga from a dedicated breaker to a GFCI (Kitchen 2) with a 2nd standard Duplex "Daisy" off the GFCI (Also GFCI protected)

Never smelled hot wire after that.

This the biggest issue with using portable heaters in an RV! The outlets don’t have screw down terminals, the insulated wire is pressed into a blade of metal that pierces the insulation and makes contact with the wire inside, it has a small contact area. That small contact area and high draw create heat in the outlet it self.
We full time so heating is an everyday process for us in winter, my father was a firefighter and saw many fires started by portable heaters, with some deaths.
Pianotuna has installed heated carpet, which keeps feet warm, the thought is interesting to me.
We chose to heat with the RV comfort systems electric furnace add-on system, this adds an electric heating element to the furnace air path, so not only heating the interior of our 5er we heat the basement. We have a temperature sensor in the basement and at just below freezing outside it reads between 51 and 49 degrees at the outside wall.


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Bumpyroad

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Posted: 12/19/20 06:47am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

coolmom42 wrote:

I've always just used the basic little cube style heaters. They go to 1500 watts and 2 different fan speeds.

Don't use them with an extension cord or plug strip. Check that the tip-over cutoff works. Set them in a place where they wont' get pushed against anything cloth or plastic. They are perfectly safe.


I will add, don't set them on the floor next to the bed as they can scorch a circle on the blanket when/if it comes in contact. [emoticon]

bumpy





Curly2001

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Posted: 12/19/20 07:15am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Thanks everyone for your input. I think I need to look at the wiring in the trailer to make sure the boxes are decent. It even makes me think that electric blankets could cause the same problems with their current draw.
Curly


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Bobbo

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Posted: 12/19/20 07:55am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I found a cube style heater with a switch on the bottom. If it falls over, it turns off. I have 2 of them.


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Dusty R

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Posted: 12/19/20 08:04am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

There's 2 things that I don't like about the portable electric heaters.
1
It's close quarters in an RV to begin with, so there is never a good place for a portable electric to begin with.
2
The thermostat is on/in the heater so it senses the temperature of the unit before the room/rv.
In our last 2 mh I have installed a Toe Kick heater under the kitchen sink/cupboard. They use a thermostat just like a furnace.
I wire it to the same breaker as the air conditioner, leaving the AC hooked to the t-stat with the LP furnace. Now the electric heat/furnace and AC can't both run at the same time. If they try to the breaker will trip.

Gdetrailer

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Posted: 12/19/20 09:00am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

rhagfo wrote:

wa8yxm wrote:

The problem is not the heater. most of them are safe now days (I like to avoid the ones that glow red however) Ceramics tend to be very compact. Oil filled very large. But all of them give exactly the same amount of heat for the same amount of electricity. all heaters are 100% efficient so if the maker says something like "3 times more efficient" they are lying. (The reason is in an electrical system all losses express as heat, with a heater this is the desired output so all losses are recovered).

Page 2: The Danger
Quick box or Unibox outlets use punch down connectors that are great at say 100mA or less (telephone current) but not so good when the amps hit double digits.

A 1500 watt heater is 12.5 amps I had one outlet overheat I've seen them melted down and wires broken and acing. Serious fire hazard AND I AM NOT AN RV SERVICE TECHINICIAN just what I've seen

I used assorted electric heaters. mostly hot (but not red) wire, some ceramic. for 15 years. But I also installed special circuits (3 of them) two were dedicatred circuit breaker via 12ga wire to a 15/20 amp duplex outlet (has a "T" shaped neutral slot) the third was 12-ga from a dedicated breaker to a GFCI (Kitchen 2) with a 2nd standard Duplex "Daisy" off the GFCI (Also GFCI protected)

Never smelled hot wire after that.

This the biggest issue with using portable heaters in an RV! The outlets don’t have screw down terminals, the insulated wire is pressed into a blade of metal that pierces the insulation and makes contact with the wire inside, it has a small contact area. That small contact area and high draw create heat in the outlet it self.
We full time so heating is an everyday process for us in winter, my father was a firefighter and saw many fires started by portable heaters, with some deaths.
Pianotuna has installed heated carpet, which keeps feet warm, the thought is interesting to me.
We chose to heat with the RV comfort systems electric furnace add-on system, this adds an electric heating element to the furnace air path, so not only heating the interior of our 5er we heat the basement. We have a temperature sensor in the basement and at just below freezing outside it reads between 51 and 49 degrees at the outside wall.


Most RVs use a "self contained" duplex outlet as mentioned above, this type of outlet does not need any electrical workbox.

This outlet subject often brings out a lot of arguments that they ARE NEC type accepted and "safe" to use and those folks have never had an issue with them.

While I have not personally seen one of these go up in flames or overheat, I am a bit hesitant in loading this type of outlet very heavy for a prolonged period of time (as in a space heater) after actually seeing the inside guts.

So, just so folks can see what concerns me, I have taken one a part and posted it multiple times on this forum..

[image]

Contact is 24ga material which is .0239 inch thickness, wire contacts on two sides so the overall wire to outlet contact area is .0478 inchs

Wire in contact photo link
[image]

Photo of wire contact link
[image]


Compared to a regular screw terminal outlet which the contact area is 5/8" LONG (.0625") and two sides of wire contact is 1.25"..

Photo of regular outlet link
[image]


Nicked wire photo from Hubbell device
[image]

The pix do not lie, you are depending on a very small contact area for the wire and outlet device. You are depending on the springiness of the outlet material to not fail under high current draw.

Less contact are = high resistance connection.

High resistance connection = High HEAT.

High heat = soften metal.

Soften metal = less tension.

Less tension = even higher resistance.

And so on and so on.

If you are really set in your mind to use electric heaters for a long term heating solution, use them on a lower heat setting and use a couple of more heaters spread out across different outlets..

OR install a dedicated heavy duty outlet for the heating device.

Alternately is installing a couple of permanent wall type heaters and hard wire them in. You can get forced air 120V permanent wall heaters, they also sell low profile "kick space" heaters for under home kitchen cabinets or even short permanent 120V 500W baseboard heaters that do not have fans (look like a how water baseboard heater).

Camp safely!

jdc1

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Posted: 12/19/20 09:02am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Oil filled.....all....the....way

IAMICHABOD

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Posted: 12/19/20 09:11am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I first started off by using one of the ceramic ones but didn't like the way they got hot in the area that they sat on and the one I had the cord got hot.

I looked at the oil filled ones but their size at the time was just to big to store in my RV.

After a bit of research and the advice of others here on the Forum I settled on the Vornado

I am Very happy with it.


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2oldman

NM

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Posted: 12/19/20 09:13am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Curly2001 wrote:

It even makes me think that electric blankets could cause the same problems with their current draw.
Not even close. From my research, blankets are under 200w.

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