RV.Net Open Roads Forum: Around the Campfire: More Reminiscing Part 2

RV Blog

  |  

RV Sales

  |  

Campgrounds

  |  

RV Parks

  |  

RV Club

  |  

RV Buyers Guide

  |  

Roadside Assistance

  |  

Extended Service Plan

  |  

RV Travel Assistance

  |  

RV Credit Card

  |  

RV Loans

Open Roads Forum Already a member? Login here.   If not, Register Today!  |  Help

Newest  |  Active  |  Popular  |  RVing FAQ Forum Rules  |  Forum Posting Help and Support  |  Contact  

Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Around the Campfire

Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire  >  General Topics

 > More Reminiscing Part 2

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev
Sponsored By:
mr. ed

Amarillo, Texas

Senior Member

Joined: 02/06/2002

View Profile



Posted: 01/01/21 12:21pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MEXICOWANDERER wrote:

Tetraethyl Lead is incredibly poisonous. In the refinery entirely white hazmat suits were used with MSA airpacks to contain a leak or spill. To my knowledge the metal was never used in additives. Graphited toluene was dark and combustible.

In the mid 1960's retail gasoline was available in a highly lead dosed version. Chevron Custom Supreme and Sunoco 260 were 5.0+ gram per gallon leaded gasoline.

When I used Chevron Supreme gasoline dosed with 10% by volume ALKYLATE I turned faster ET ¼ mile dragstrip times as compared to Custom Supreme. A full tenth second quicker. That busted my bubble with high octane lead. 115/145 octane av gas had lots of alkylate.

Remember Richfield when it first changed to Arco? They tried a heavily graphited motor oil. I tried it for fuel mileage, gained nothing but badly stained hands and clothes.


Yes, I remember that too, Mexicowanderer. BTW, the lead additive I mentioned probably wasn't lead at all, as you mentioned, but some kind of substitute for lead. Old age is beginning to impair my memory. [emoticon]


Mr. Ed (fulltiming since 1987)
Life is fragile. Handle with prayer.

2007 Hitchhiker II LS Model 29.5 LKTG (sold)
2007 Dodge Ram 3500/6.7 CTD/QC/4X4/SB/SRW/6-speed man/Big Horn edition (sold)


AKsilvereagle

North Pole, Alaska

Senior Member

Joined: 04/17/2010

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/01/21 09:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Speaking of which -

When I first rebuilt the Ford 429 engine in my 1970 Thunderbird - I had to put a lot of thought into it of what I really wanted and what to fully commit on, as far as making it a long term everyday driver or not....

So in 1988, I decided it would be best to eventually own another vehicle when I could afford to do so in the future and designate it as an everyday driver, rather than appointing my 70 T-Bird as an everyday driver in the long run....

- I decided NOT to lower the compression ratio at 9:1 in order to run pump gas (committing to the everyday driver status), and keep a stock mild build design by increasing the advertised 10.5:1 compression ratio to 11:1 with Forged TRW flattop pistons

- The big block engine is a factory head design (D0VE-C) with only 72cc of volume, that is a CLOSED chamber design !!!!
....This was the turning point of my decision after weighing the factors - I wanted this engine to still really hold the power that it was designed for and not make it an open chambered engine with the lower compression ratio (even though it would still be powerful), however it would be more expensive to run for an everyday driver in this regard because I would need to run 100 octane fuel or better as I would go to the fuel bulk plant or the airport to obtain AVGAS, which is 100 octane low lead fuel.

- Since committing to keep the 11:1 compression ratio, this is what was also modified for my engine :

TRW Forged .030 flattop pistons
Dual Valve Springs
270-280 duration RV cam
Hi Volume Water Pump
Hi Volume Oil Pump
True Double Roller Timing Set (still going at 113,000+ miles)
ARP Distributor Oil Pump Shaft

I first started mixing pump gas and AVGAS while still everyday driving the car at the time, and it did great on flat roads and cooler air, however on hot days or climbing hills it would still spark knock or ping - all that had stopped once I ran straight AVGAS full time.

I have yet to see any vehicle succeed to passing my 5400 lb car going uphill on any 5% to 10% grades (differential only has 2.80:1 gearing) as I drive the car fast going uphill anymore.

At the time when AVGAS was $1.596 a gallon at the bulk plant while pump gas here was around the $1.10 a gallon mark, my fuel mileage increased by a little over a mile per gallon running full AVGAS and my cents per mile figures had also beat (lowered) in comparison to running pump gas by the slightest of margin during mid summer season because of the increased fuel mileage on straight AVGAS alone.

With current fuel prices, there is no way to overcome a lower cents per mile running straight AVGAS nowadays with pump gas at $2.559 a gallon and AVGAS at $4.640 a gallon (bulk plant) in my area....buying AVGAS at the airport would fetch $5.200 a gallon.

The only real drawbacks to running AVGAS for me is :

Due to federal law and some state laws, a retailer cannot directly dispense that fuel in any motor vehicle, so for years I carried 32 gallons of gas cans in the trunk (it's a two dead body sized trunk) and the fuel distributors were allowed to fill the cans themselves with AVGAS without an issue.....I would drive off the property and empty my gas cans dispensing into my fuel tank myself, pull back in with an additional prepaid invoice and have them refill my gas cans.

Having to stop at airports in non local areas was another drawback by having to either clear security if there was no direct access to a fuel station, or wait a while upon purchasing fuel depending how they ran an airport's format.

Here is a picture I taken after getting cleared by security to enter the tarmac at Whitehorse International Airport in the Yukon Territory during my vacation in June 1994 - - - - Filler Up, Please :

[image]

Since October 1985, I have logged and kept track of every fuel purchase I made, amount paid, gallons consumed, price per gallon, fuel grade, miles per gallon and cents per mile with logged odometer readings to every vehicle I own.


1975 Ford F250 2WD Ranger XLT (Owned June 2013)
460 V8- C6 Trans- 3.73:1 (171K Total Mi)
2000 Fleetwood Angler 8ft Cabover
Air Lift 1000 (Front)
Hellwig 3500 lb Helper Springs (rear)
Hellwig Front and Rear Sway Bars
Goodyear G971 LT Series (siped)


egh33

Texas

Senior Member

Joined: 12/19/2003

View Profile



Good Sam RV Club Member

Offline
Posted: 01/02/21 02:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

MY first car that I bought all by my self 1939 Chev coupe. Cost $200.00 I think about year 1950. Paid cash.





mr. ed

Amarillo, Texas

Senior Member

Joined: 02/06/2002

View Profile



Posted: 01/05/21 05:32pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Reminiscing of Childhood:
I'm going into a different subject now:

About 1951 my parents had a new home built in North Babylon, Long Island NY. The area was pretty rural at the time ; I was then 7 years old. We had a large back yard with woods and a lake just beyond the wooded area. We enjoyed a fun and healthy life as we spent most of our time outdoors.

Wild berries (i.e. Blackberries and blueberries) grew within easy reach, and we would serve them on cereal or with evaporated milk.

We dug underground “bunkers” and, in addition, built a tree house in the woods (fortunately, the “bunkers” never caved in on us and the tree house was pretty sturdy and safe).Somehow, we obtained the lumber, probably from a nearby home being constructed. That was probably the only bad thing we did. 

We also enjoyed rafting on the lake with our home-built raft. Fishing on the lake was pretty good. I remember catching many eels ( they were pretty good eating, too, and put up a good fight). I would nail its head to a board and pull the skin off, leaving a solid rope of meat with few bones. Additionally, there were bluegill (aka sunfish), which were also tasty but didn’t have much meat. Occasionally, a trout or catfish could be landed.

Our backyard was large enough that I could grow a vegetable garden. It wasn’t too successful at first, since I was so young and had a lot to learn. When I was grown up, that love of gardening continued and I grew fairly successful gardens at each place we moved. My favorite veggies were zucchinis, tomatoes, cukes and various root vegetables. I tried corn, but didn’t succeed in growing large ears. I didn’t fully understand cross fertilization at the time. Still, the exercise received was beneficial; no machinery was used, only hand power.

We could play in the woods for hours as there were no dangers, except having to be careful of poison ivy and poison sumac Other than ticks, there were only harmless critters living there: garter snakes, squirrels, box turtles, rabbits. One year, I suffered a really bad case of poison sumac. It blew up my face like a balloon. We think it was caused by breathing in smoke from a fire my neighbor had lit to burn plant material that she had trimmed from the woods. The family doctor made a house call in order to treat me. Yes, house calls were still made in those days. His recommended treatment seemed strange. As I recall, it was washcloths soaked in milk, to be laid across my face. Well, he was the doc, and hopefully knew best.[emoticon]

Our neighbors were quite gregarious and we would enjoy block parties at regular times, where everyone pitched in with home cooked meals.

Another lake nearby (Red Mill Lake) provided ice skating, although I never got the hang of it and was too scared of falling down.

Visiting the old home years later, I was appalled at what changes “modernization” had caused. A major highway now runs through what had one time been our back yard, only yards from the house, and a housing development was built on the lakefront of our once pristine lake, There's just no stopping such “progress” from happening! [emoticon]

----------------

* This post was last edited 01/05/21 02:29pm by an administrator/moderator *   View edit history

MEXICOWANDERER

las peñas, michoacan, mexico

Senior Member

Joined: 06/01/2007

View Profile


Offline
Posted: 01/06/21 07:55pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I "went back" once. Forty years later. The neighborhood had "shrunk" somehow. Now it was small. The people ripped out every last walnut orchard tree. What used to be hundreds of orchard trees was decimated. The landscaping was warped to look exactly like every other neighborhood in a 100 mile radius. What was missing was a towering sculpture of Tom Wolfe.

2012Coleman

Florida

Senior Member

Joined: 08/20/2012

View Profile






Posted: 01/07/21 07:56am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

When I want to reminisce, I open the garage door and take this for a spin - usually many times a week.

[image].


Experience without good judgment is worthless; good judgment without experience is still good judgment!

2018 RAM 3500 Big Horn CTD
2018 Grand Design Reflection 303RLS

mr. ed

Amarillo, Texas

Senior Member

Joined: 02/06/2002

View Profile



Posted: 01/07/21 09:05am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

2012Coleman wrote:

When I want to reminisce, I open the garage door and take this for a spin - usually many times a week.

[image].


That's a beauty, sir. If you ever want to give it away, send me a message. Thank you.

Reply to Topic  |  Subscribe  |  Print Topic  |  Post New Topic  | 
Page of 4  
Prev

Open Roads Forum  >  Around the Campfire  >  General Topics

 > More Reminiscing Part 2
Search:   Advanced Search

Search only in Around the Campfire


New posts No new posts
Closed, new posts Closed, no new posts
Moved, new posts Moved, no new posts

Adjust text size:




© 2021 CWI, Inc. © 2021 Good Sam Enterprises, LLC. All Rights Reserved.