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 > Remember when tv

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colliehauler

Mc Pherson KS USA

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Posted: 12/25/20 08:42am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

dturm wrote:

My first color TV was 1970.

I had an eccentric uncle who had 4 TVs in his living room stacked 2 x 2. One Zenith even had a remote! One was color and we used to love to go to his house especially on New Year's day where we could watch multiple football games at the same time.
When my Sister and BIL got married they had a 19" portable that had a remote that worked by sound when the phone would ring it would change channels. It was the first remote I remember seeing. I was 6 she was 20.

sljohnson1938

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Posted: 12/25/20 09:16am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

ya - i remember when you had to get up to changes channels or volume.
our neighbor was the first to get a TV and i would go there to watch the Lone Ranger. Black and White of course.


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JRscooby

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Posted: 12/25/20 09:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

colliehauler wrote:

AKSilvereagle- Another thing I miss is the Mom and Pop restaurants with home cooked food instead of chain restaurant's of today. Some small Kansas towns still have home cooking but it's rare.


'50s and '60s the wisdom said "When traveling, look for where the truck drivers eat" And at that time, it was likely a good idea. By mid '70s, when I started OTR, thing where changing. More trucking was longer distance, so drivers did not know all the places they went past, and big parking lot was more important. But all truck stops used their kitchens as a draw for drivers to spend company money on fuel. Remember MT tables and the owner's wife telling people lined up outside "NO! That area is for drivers. They can't wait for you to eat. You can wait or go"
As for now; DW is a quilter, so we often stop at independent fabric shops. If close to meal time I ask, "We like to support local business, where should we eat?" Bet most any shop owner in any a town could point you to a non-chain restaurant.

Quote:

In Kansas we had the three networks as a kid then got PBS later on. Remember all the antennas on long poles at every house to get reception. Also remember going out and turning the pole to get the best reception while Dad would call out through the window. We were a fringe area for reception.


I remember each of use go thru TV Guide, write the time/day and name of programs we each wanted to watch for week. Trades and deals to work out the plan for week.
Also, When the cable companies wanted to hang wires on right-o-way poles one of the promises was "Programs with no commercials"

AKsilvereagle

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Posted: 12/25/20 10:25am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Quote:

AKSilvereagle- Another thing I miss is the Mom and Pop restaurants with home cooked food instead of chain restaurant's of today. Some small Kansas towns still have home cooking but it's rare.

In Kansas we had the three networks as a kid then got PBS later on. Remember all the antennas on long poles at every house to get reception. Also remember going out and turning the pole to get the best reception while Dad would call out through the window. We were a fringe area for reception.



I feel you - Over the past 10 years, what Mom and Pop roadhouses remained on the Alaska Highway in Canada that actually survived thru 2010 are virtually all gone now, a thing in the past....

When Rancheria Lodge closed in 2018, that really hurt.

Shepherds Inn, Sasquatch Crossing, Toad River Lodge, Northern Rockies Lodge, Liard Hot Springs Lodge, Contact Creek Lodge, Yukon Motel in Teslin, Otter Falls, Talbot Arm in Destruction Bay are pretty much all that is left on the Alaska Highway as far as "roadhouse type" remote places off the top of my head that I know for sure that are still open on the Canadian side....

On the Alaska side, there are no remote roadhouses anymore - pretty much Fast Eddys in Tok is the main hub to get a bite to eat on the Alaska Highway in Alaska.


Fast Eddys, Border City (when they had a running restaurant) in Alaska, Otter Falls in the Yukon and Humptys in Fort St. John used to be open 24 hours on the Alaska Highway, not anymore.


I also remember having to move the UHF rabbit ears antenna around the house to get good reception depending which channel you wanted to watch, such as in the kitchen on the toaster, or on the stereo, or hangin out the window outside.


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kellem

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Posted: 12/25/20 10:41am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I believe 1964 was our first color TV and remember Grandma being upset about the purchase. She claimed it was the one eyed devil.

Remember buying my own personal TV for my bedroom in 1972, had them fancy rabbit ears.
It was a 12" black and white.
I was so excited to lay back in bed undisturbed and watch the Baltimore bullets play.

Fast forward,
We have this high tech 70" blue-ray bluetooth HD smart tv....and the wife and I hardly ever watch tv.

Lynnmor

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Posted: 12/25/20 10:58am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

colliehauler wrote:



In Kansas we had the three networks as a kid then got PBS later on. Remember all the antennas on long poles at every house to get reception. Also remember going out and turning the pole to get the best reception while Dad would call out through the window. We were a fringe area for reception.


With more over the air channels than ever before, it is surprising how few know that. Rotating antennas are a real benefit if one wants to take advantage of free TV.





colliehauler

Mc Pherson KS USA

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Posted: 12/25/20 11:17am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

With the rise of Dish prices and lack of local programming I find myself watching more over the air channels then Dish. If my place up North had any over the air channels I would ditch Dish.

* This post was edited 12/25/20 11:48am by an administrator/moderator *

mr. ed

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Posted: 12/25/20 02:31pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Growing up on Long Island, we had a TV in the living room that used one of the very early remotes. The remote worked by sounds of different frequencies for volume, channel and on-off. It was a clever device, totally mechanical, in which metal bars of different lengths were struck by a hammer when the appropriate button was pushed.

The funny thing was that since the tv was was sound actuated, it was prone to being affected by other sounds nearby. It never failed, when my mom ran the carpet sweeper nearby, the TV would change channels unexpectedly. The sweeper evidently emitted sounds at the same frequency as the remote. Thankfully today's remotes utilize electronic means of control. [emoticon]


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bsinmich

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Posted: 12/25/20 03:48pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

We got our first TV in 1949. People said we were going to ruin our eyes when we got the 12.5" screen. 10" was big enough. We got our first color in 1964, an Admiral 25". We were fortunate to live in Detroit. Windsor, Ontario was just South of us and we could watch channel 9 so we got 4 channels before UHF came into use. Yes, to you doubters. To get to Canada from Detroit you go South.


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atreis

IN

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Posted: 12/25/20 06:14pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

First color television: 1984. I was in high school. Before that we had no TV at all, but I would occasionally watch TV at friends' houses or my grandparent's house.

Perhaps oddly, I got my first computer (which had a dedicated monitor that couldn't function as a TV) in 1981.

I read a lot as a kid.


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