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 > Changing Spare Tire

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BFL13

Victoria, BC

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Posted: 12/29/20 03:59pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Besides all that heavy duty equipment, you also need your usual ordinary little tool box. The inner tire air valve extensions are attached to the pretty outside fake wheel hub, so you need to deal with those too. [emoticon]


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BarabooBob

Baraboo, WI

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Posted: 12/29/20 04:41pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I will repeat what someone said about having a spare WITH PROPER PRESSURE.
I have carried a 12 volt compressor for many years. I have used it for helping other people many more times than I have used it on my TT or truck. Last summer while in Glacier NP, my camping neighbor was using a bicycle tire pump to fill his spare when he woke up in the morning to a flat TT tire. I thought he was going to hug and kiss me when I pulled out my Viair compressor. Before I left him, I gave him my old cheapie compressor that I picked up at a garage sale for $5.
It is beyond belief that people will pull a trailer of any type without knowing if their tow vehicle jack and lug wrench will work on their trailer.


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Bordercollie

Garden Grove, CA, USA

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Posted: 12/31/20 11:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

On our Tioga 26Q the spare wheel/tire is mounted in the front of cavernous cargo hold behind a lot of stuff that has to be removed for access. I am 82 and hope to never have a blowout/flat, etc. I will call emergency service and remove the stuff to give the guy access to the spare. At least we do have a spare.

PatJ

Eastern WA

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Posted: 01/02/21 06:53pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

hpdrver wrote:

Seems the best advice is to have a spare and the tools required to change a spare and decide whether to do it by yourself based on the situation.


I agree with this 100%. If I get a flat in the real world, I am going to drive slowly to somewhere safe if at all possible (even if I ruin a rim.) I would then call roadside assist and let them place my mounted spare.

But I go too many places with no cell phone service, so I carry a ~$40 HF bottle jack, 4x cheap HF rubber chocks, a 30" HF breaker bar, extension, and socket; and a Autozone 4-way. This past summer I picked up a nail for a slow leak in the driver's side inner dual. At the end of season I swapped with my spare in my driveway before taking the leaker to the tire shop for repair. I also practiced pulling/swapping the front.

I feel more confident having installed the spare in both front and rear position using tools I carry, a worst-case-scenario tire situation. It was not physically difficult in the driveway, but would be very stressful to do on the side of the highway.


Patrick

Harvey51

Alberta

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Posted: 01/10/21 10:02pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I’m age 69 and comfortable changing a front wheel with the tools I carry all the time. In 12 years of RVing I have never needed to change a wheel on the road but we often travel away from civilization like the trip to the big waterfall and spectacular rock formations south of Tumbler Ridge, BC. I have had to change a wheel on smaller vehicles about 3 times in 30 years of driving so it won’t happen often.

I am afraid to try changing a dual wheel. I would like to view such a change with the two wheels stuck together and see how to handle that problem.

Meanwhile, I have upgraded my wife’s Alberta Motor Association membership to cover RV wheel problems.

Are there short term coverages available for a month cruise in the USA?


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Grit dog

Black Diamond, WA

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Posted: 01/11/21 01:01am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

^Just make sure they’re not “stuck” together.
Although I’ve never seen wheels stuck together. Would have to be a very rusty barnacle.


"Yes Sir, Oct 10 1888, Those poor school children froze to death in their tracks. They did not even find them until Spring. Especially hard hit were the ones who had to trek uphill to school both ways, with no shoes." -Bert A.

klutchdust

Orange, California

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Posted: 01/11/21 09:18am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

" I would like to view such a change with the two wheels stuck together and see how to handle that problem."

I have changed out hundreds of big rig and various types of dual wheel set ups in my career. The set up called "budd wheels" on big rigs were notorious

for sticking together especially when I wrenched in Upstate New York due to salt corrosion. The solution was a sledgehammer to the rim or if the tire

was still inflated the tire itself. And these were steel wheels. The aluminum wheels were not a problem. The smaller dual wheel type on a RV were rarely an

issue. Carry a sledgehammer if you are able to swing it a little and usually a few whacks and it will break free.

bobndot

USA

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Posted: 01/11/21 11:06am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I added a 7’ 2x4 to that list because i’m always playing in snow country.

I found it a lot safer and easier to go to the opposite side of the rv and hammer the long 2x4 to free a stuck wheel rather than reach under the flat side where you have a shorter and less powerful stroke. I spray the wheel then sledge-hammer it. If the jack collapses while you are hammering at least you wont be underneath it.

Dusty R

Charlotte Michigan 48813

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Posted: 01/11/21 01:11pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Maybe try loosening the lugs slightly then driving a very short distance.

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