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ndanecker

NJ

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Posted: 02/08/21 01:57pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Curious if anyone has used their RV for winter ski trips instead of renting a condo or house local to the ski area. I found a few RV parks open during the winter months near a ski resort and the Mrs. was asking if the RV would be an option. Of course it would need to be unwinterized if we wanted to use water (which is preferred). Just curious if others did this and if it was worth the effort. How did you address the freezing pipe issue during ride home until you get to winterize the pipes again, or is it possible to keep the RV above freezing for the next trip (lets say 40 or 45*)? I know it would be easier to rent a place but we like our own stuff (and germs). Its more a comfort thing then to save money, but I think that's a given as we all know RVs are more expensive in the long run over renting a hotel, condo or house.

smarty

new mexico

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Posted: 02/08/21 02:27pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

run your rig up and back without any water in the lines
easy to blow them out with air
guessing you have a heated underbelly?

ndanecker

NJ

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Posted: 02/08/21 03:44pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

The ones we are looking at have a heated underbelly. If you blow the lines out do you also need to pump the pink juice, or can you wait till you get home or the following day? Guess it depends on temp and how long to cool back down.

I'm surprised mfg don't design lines that completely drain. Not hard to do. Keep dump valves for areas that cannot be designed to drain or have low points.

JaxDad

Greater Toronto Area

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Posted: 02/08/21 04:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Since “earth” is a less than informative location and you don’t say where you are or where you think you might want to go it’s tough to give you a good answer, but, I’ll try.

First off, do NOT use water from the RV’s plumbing system. It will not end well. Flush and cook with jugs of water, the black & grey tank dump valves are big enough to be the last things to freeze.

Secondly, do not forget that RV furnaces are HUNGRY. Both in terms of propane AND electricity. A single day with heat on will kill your battery, I said “day” not “night”. A weekend parked with heat on and plugged in will put a serious dent in a tank of propane.

Lwiddis

Death Valley NP

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Posted: 02/08/21 04:07pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

Not ski trips but cold camping. Can be done if you follow the basics. Water freezing is you top enemy with low battery performance at number two.


Winnebago 2101DS TT & 2020 Chevy Silverado 1500 LTZ Z71, 300 watt solar-parallel & MPPT, Trojan T-125s. TALL flag pole. Prefer USFS, COE, BLM, NPS, TVA, state & county camps. Bicyclist! 14 year Army vet-11B40 then 11A - (MOS 1542 & 1560) IOBC & IOAC grad


DrewE

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Posted: 02/08/21 04:10pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I haven't used my motorhome for ski vacations, but I have done a little cold-weather/winter camping in it.

If you have a motorhome that's set up for cold weather use (with enclosed heated tanks and plumbing), it's not at all hard to keep the plumbing above freezing while you're on the road. With a trailer, you could leave the furnace turned on while traveling, assuming the airflow from traveling doesn't cause problems with the burner--and I suspect in most cases it would not do so.

If you properly blow out the pipes with an air compressor, there's no need to put pink stuff anywhere besides the drain traps. The key is to take your time and make sure you get all the water out of all the fixtures and fittings. As a bonus, you then don't have to get antifreeze out of the pipes when you dewinterize; merely fill the water system (and sanitize if needed/desired).

(I also think it would be nice if manufacturers made the plumbing systems so they could be properly gravity drained. Granted, doing such draining would probably require that the RV be pretty carefully leveled...but other than that, it would be fairly well foolproof. Growing up, we had a sort of in-law apartment above our detached garage, the water system of which could be gravity drained relatively easily for periods of winter non-use. Draining the water heater tank was by far the most time-consuming part of the process.)





ferndaleflyer

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Posted: 02/09/21 07:48am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I have now moved South from Baltimore but---we used our RV all the time to go skiing. I remember 7 Springs, PA had RV sites right at the lodge and we spent a lot of time there. Some places I would just park in a lot and run my generator. Ran out of propane once because I forgot to fill and never used on board water. With 3 kids it was about the only way we could go as much as we did. Snow Shoe, Wisp, 7 Springs, Liberty, Round top, etc. Never had a problem.

way2roll

Wilmington NC

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Posted: 02/09/21 08:07am Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

As others have said it depends on a variety of factors. The type of RV is probably the most critical. Some are designed to use in cold temps and some aren't. Insulation, heated tanks and bays vary drastically from RV to RV. A poorly insulated RV will burn through a lot more LP than a well insulated one. Almost all RV's claim to have heated tanks. However most of the time that claim is supported by a heat duct that is near plumbing lines. If you don't plan to use the plumbing then you can mitigate that risk. If you do, it's wise to get an RV designed for cold weather and blow the lines before and after your trip if not run 2 gals of antifreeze through. Will you be plugged into shore power? If not, do you have a generator? Batteries can die quickly and will need recharged. Temps are also a consideration. If the weather is going to be 40's in the day and 30's at night, no big deal. If it's in the teens and wind is blowing, a whole different ball game. One thing is certain, you don't always know when a pipe, fixture or pump will freeze. When it thaws it can be pretty expensive and damaging.


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ndanecker

NJ

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Posted: 02/09/21 04:06pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

All good comments. Thanks for posting.

We are looking at the GD 353g or 395m. Must have's are single bath, toy hauler, dinette table, king bed and a slew of wants.

blt2ski

Kirkland, Wa

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Posted: 02/10/21 10:01pm Link  |  Quote  |  Print  |  Notify Moderator

I remember one new years eve with 50-100 rv's in local overnight parking lot at ski area. Another presidents weekend with 300 rv's for the buddy warner race going on......15+ weekends a season for 12 or 13 years IIRC. Great way to ski! Did I mention TT license plate was skiht46......ski hut for six! not too mention the 2 alaska malamutes that came for the ride too!

Yes, take off with full tank of water, as you will probably NOT have access. Some area's have electric hookups. If none, have as much battery power as you can afford and carry. Along with a generator. If you use a generator, try to stay away from the electric hook up folks. They can look at you with despise!
Manual drain valves were my headache. As water freezes upward into the drain tee, and you lost water from that point to usually where you wanted it, like toilet in my case! Otherwise no issues with plumbing down to between 0-5F. Heating tanks were not normal in the 90's, so gray and black would freeze up. Usually back in lowlands they would thaw in a day or two so I could dump. Usually got 4-6 days, or 2 weekends out of a tank. So even if it stayed at or below freezing that week, it was not a big deal if I did not empty.
I would use 7-10 gals of LP per friday afternoon to sunday eve, depending upon temps. Two size 31 bats lasted 24-48 hrs depending upon temps, and if my 4 kiddos turned on the AC/DC tv saturday after skiing......
I do not remember the name of the vent covers, but they allowed me to keep them open so there was not as much moisture on the inside, especially windows. Single pains will freeze/frost on colder nights.
We did not have a micro, so we did the cooking with LP stove and oven.
Shower was the storage for ski boots to dry out in.
do NOT put out the awning unless it is sunny out! Also depending upon the snow conditions when snowing, using a slide out can be bad. Especially if you can get 3-5' of heavy wet snow while up at ski area. It may not come back in, or worst yet, literally break! I have not seen later myself, but have heard of one or two. If they have awnings on them, make sure they go in at the same time as slide. or, yes I have seen awnings fall apart with a foot or more of snow on them. Along with you may come downhill as I did one time, getting stuck on the hill with local pass close for 48 hrs, 5+ feet fell down. Usual total was around 15K lbs, hit a scale half way home at 22K lbs due to snow on roof of trailer, and snow in the bed of the truck to roof top level, except where the generator was in the back end......
Have I scared you yet? NO! Better yet.
Have fun, be prepared for some issues that you do not have in the summer per say. If chains are usable in your state(s) you are traveling in, get some for both rear of tow rig, and both tires on trailer. I preferred rear axle if you have a tandem. Front only works too. Here in Washington, chains can be required for towing and rigs over 10K lbs. most of the west coast states in rockies and cascades are this way. Dry fit ahead of time, then use when its bad. I found down hill was the time I was most glad i had them. Especially on the 10+% grade coming down from timberline in 40-60 mph winds, and a road that was a smooth compacted snowy mess. I could stop, no one else could with out chains....4wd is not always your friend for stopping. GOing yes, stopping, nadda!

Marty


92 Navistar dump truck, 7.3L 7 sp, 4.33 gears with a Detroit no spin
00 Chev C2500, V5700, 4L80E, 4.10, base truck, no options!
92 Red-e-haul 12K equipment trailer

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